Can I use any other rice as a substitute to Risotto

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kenny1999

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I am a beginner and learning to make simple mushroom Risotto. I am not in Europe or American and Risotto is not common here. I don't neeed a perfect dish . Can I use Japan sushi rice instead?
 

medtran49

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I use Valencia rice when I don't have time or don't feel like making a special trip to get Arborio and don't find much of a difference. Valencia rice is what is used in traditional paella. I don't think sushi rice will work as its too sticky. Maybe if you rinse it and soak it overnight to get the majority of the starch out but I personally wouldn't try it.
 

GotGarlic

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Arborio and sushi rice are both short-grained and starchy. The starchiness, or stickiness, is what makes risotto creamy when you cook it with the chicken broth and wine. I think the sushi rice would work fine.
 

GLC

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Yeah. This is probably more than we need to know, but...

Ordinary Japanese rice, which is appropriate for sushi, as well as being sticky enough for chopsticks, will work, with some cautions. While Arborio has been nicely selected for risotto, the other short and medium grains share the desirable characteristics to some degree but are not exactly the same. In Japan, sushi rice is likely uruchimi. In the US, domestic sushi rice will likely be Calrose medium grain, the founding rice of the California rice industry.

But you have to be alert and stand by prepared to adjust the amount of liquid. For instance, you can readily substitute Spanish Bomba, the rice used in paella, but Bomba will absorb 50% more liquid. Common long grain rice typically preps 2 cups water to one cup dry rice. Bomba typically preps three cups water. Sushi rice may prep one cup to one cup. But rice:water ratios are as much about the character of the finished product than a firm requirement of the variety of rice.

People in the US often sub Arborio for Bomba in paella, because it's easier to find, but it's advisable to rinse it thoroughly to remove some starch and cut water from 1:3 to 1:2, because it won't absorb as much as the Bomba would have.

My gut feeling is that the sushi rice will not absorb as much as Arborio, so, if I were doing it, I'd be conservative with liquid but prepared to adjust on the fly, which is okay, since you're adding liquid in small doses while stirring, anyway. With risotto, we want a wet result, and that wetness will, I suspect, take care of any inherent stickiness. I suspect the typically sticky sushi rice will be not unlike the wet Arborio in risotto, if we are careful not to make it too wet.
 

kenny1999

Senior Cook
Joined
Jan 18, 2012
Messages
376
Location
Far East
Yeah. This is probably more than we need to know, but...

Ordinary Japanese rice, which is appropriate for sushi, as well as being sticky enough for chopsticks, will work, with some cautions. While Arborio has been nicely selected for risotto, the other short and medium grains share the desirable characteristics to some degree but are not exactly the same. In Japan, sushi rice is likely uruchimi. In the US, domestic sushi rice will likely be Calrose medium grain, the founding rice of the California rice industry.

But you have to be alert and stand by prepared to adjust the amount of liquid. For instance, you can readily substitute Spanish Bomba, the rice used in paella, but Bomba will absorb 50% more liquid. Common long grain rice typically preps 2 cups water to one cup dry rice. Bomba typically preps three cups water. Sushi rice may prep one cup to one cup. But rice:water ratios are as much about the character of the finished product than a firm requirement of the variety of rice.

People in the US often sub Arborio for Bomba in paella, because it's easier to find, but it's advisable to rinse it thoroughly to remove some starch and cut water from 1:3 to 1:2, because it won't absorb as much as the Bomba would have.

My gut feeling is that the sushi rice will not absorb as much as Arborio, so, if I were doing it, I'd be conservative with liquid but prepared to adjust on the fly, which is okay, since you're adding liquid in small doses while stirring, anyway. With risotto, we want a wet result, and that wetness will, I suspect, take care of any inherent stickiness. I suspect the typically sticky sushi rice will be not unlike the wet Arborio in risotto, if we are careful not to make it too wet.


Hi, I m afraid if I misunderstand your meaning.

Did you mean if I use Japneese sushi rice, the rice:water ratio should be 1:1?

I 've ever been to Italy and I don't know if the risotto I eat out locally is typical, the risotto in restaurant here (Hong Kong) is not watery. In fact, it's even a little bit sticky. So, is typical Risotto sticky or watery or normal?
I don't actually like watery rice, any tips on that? Reducing amount of water?
 

msmofet

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Messages
12,967
Hi, I m afraid if I misunderstand your meaning.

Did you mean if I use Japneese sushi rice, the rice:water ratio should be 1:1?

I 've ever been to Italy and I don't know if the risotto I eat out locally is typical, the risotto in restaurant here (Hong Kong) is not watery. In fact, it's even a little bit sticky. So, is typical Risotto sticky or watery or normal?
I don't actually like watery rice, any tips on that? Reducing amount of water?
Does it look like this?

img_1371562_0_a26ea2c31785a89de0032b159cf2ff90.jpg
 

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