Cast Iron Griddle...how do I season?

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snowkitten52

Assistant Cook
Joined
Dec 29, 2002
Messages
1
I recently bought a cast iron griddle and seasoned it according to the instructions. My first meal on it stuck (bbq sauce), and wouldn't come off with a regular washing. I soaked it in the sink, and now it's rusty. Is there anyway to fix it? Hope I didn't ruin a good griddle. Thanks
 

pgladden

Assistant Cook
Joined
Nov 26, 2002
Messages
13
Don't worry you can always "fix" cast iron. What you need to do is scrub it down real good so that all of the rust is gone. Then start breaking it in all over again.

Keep the griddle oiled and then anytime you use the oven throw the griddle in there after you finish cooking with a good coat of oil in it. I'd let it sit in the oven while it cools off. When I mess up my frying pans I try to cook things that won't stick -- like sauteing onions or cooking fries (back in the days when they were really fried :D )

Just take it slow, it really takes months and months to break in cast iron well. I try not to wash with soap and water unless I have to. Whenever possible I just wipe it down with a paper towel.

It would also help to keep a thin coat of oil on your cast iron after washing it.

I love my cast iron and find that after a while (like a year or more) that it can be almost as stick free as some of the coated pans. Good luck


Pada
 

glennm

Assistant Cook
Joined
Aug 21, 2002
Messages
11
Season initially with Crisco....Then after that always give a coat with veg. oil. As previously mentioned, just put in oven with other bakings, wipe reoil and you'll have seasoned C.I. in no time. If you use veg. oil to initially season your C.I. will become sticky.
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2002
Messages
69
Location
USA
To get the rust off, steel wool worked good for me. Cast Iron is pretty much invincible - you won't hurt it!! :)
 

Essie

Senior Cook
Joined
Mar 20, 2003
Messages
141
Location
USA,Illinois
I was given some old cast iron skillets that were really rusty. I soaked them in 1/2 white vinegar and 1/2 hot water for a few hours, then I scrubbed them with a steel pad. They cleaned up quite easily, as the vinegar is an acid and helped to start the cleaning. You have to be careful not to soak for too long, though.
 

kitchenelf

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Feb 21, 2002
Messages
19,722
Location
North Carolina
essie - vinegar is a great thing to get rid of rust. I have some silverware that was given to me and the knives want to rust on the edges - I just wipe them down with white vinegar, rinse and dry thoroughly. Actually I saw the trick using vinegar in some movie where someone was locked in a room and was trying to remove the hinges but they were rusty - she was given something to eat with some vinegar and she just happened to remember something her mother said about vinegar removing rust - so I tried it and it actually worked!!! LOL - she also escaped because the vinegar got the rust off the hinges!!! :roll:
 

62Gidget

Assistant Cook
Joined
Apr 14, 2004
Messages
10
Location
Portland, Oregon
Cast Iron

I have acquired many cast iron skillets from 2nd hand/Goodwill type stores. I take them home & scrub very well with soap, water & steel wool. For oil I use coconut oil, peanut oil, rice bran oil or Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Rub well inside & out. Put in cold oven. Turn on to 300*, leave for at least 1 hour. I usually leave for 3 hours. Some pans need more than others. When finished turn oven off & leave pan in to cool. Be certain to turn on your kitchen fan to take the odor away. It can be strong. Don't cook on too high of heat because the pans hold heat and seem hotter than other pans. I have a gas range & that of course is somewhat different than electric.
 

LMJ

Senior Cook
Joined
Apr 4, 2004
Messages
216
Location
Kent, Ohio
Hey, on a similar note... I just got a little iron skillet as a gift. I mean, _really_ little thing, only cost two bucks. The Chinese factory foundry put some sort of wax all over the thing to keep it from rusting during shipping, and I can't seem to get this stuff off. Not even with sandblasting. Any idea on maybe a chemical solvent I could try? Vinegar didn't so much as penetrate the surface.
 

RockAndFire

Assistant Cook
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
25
LMJ said:
Hey, on a similar note... I just got a little iron skillet as a gift. I mean, _really_ little thing, only cost two bucks. The Chinese factory foundry put some sort of wax all over the thing to keep it from rusting during shipping, and I can't seem to get this stuff off. Not even with sandblasting. Any idea on maybe a chemical solvent I could try? Vinegar didn't so much as penetrate the surface.

I wouldn't want to eat off of anything that I chemically treated beforehand :?
 

scott123

Senior Cook
Joined
Feb 22, 2004
Messages
403
Location
USA,NewJersey
LMJ said:
Hey, on a similar note... I just got a little iron skillet as a gift. I mean, _really_ little thing, only cost two bucks. The Chinese factory foundry put some sort of wax all over the thing to keep it from rusting during shipping, and I can't seem to get this stuff off. Not even with sandblasting. Any idea on maybe a chemical solvent I could try? Vinegar didn't so much as penetrate the surface.
You might be able to burn it off in a self cleaning oven. I don't know what kind of smoke that will create though. First I would try vegetable oil. The substance might be oil soluble. I've found grain alcohol, not vodka or gin but the 190+ proof stuff, works as a solvent on a variety of things.
 

LMJ

Senior Cook
Joined
Apr 4, 2004
Messages
216
Location
Kent, Ohio
It's just big enough for one egg or a boneless pork chop (I know, shame on me... It was the slaughterhouse that deboned the loin, I'd have kept it if it were me).

If I was gonna try burning it off, I'd use a blowtorch... Which might not be a half bad idea...

I'll give the alchohol a try first.
 

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