Ceviche, Cebiche, Seviche

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Rocklobster

Master Chef
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Nov 10, 2010
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Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
OK. I figured as much. I am landlocked and live 100 miles from the city. Not much fresh fish around here. I have a few supermarkets which offer a decent variety of seafood products, but they are all frozen. I would be interested in trying it, even though it is not an ideal situation.
Thanks, doods.
 

taxlady

Chef Extraordinaire
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Sep 13, 2010
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near Montreal, Quebec
I have found out that the benefits of eating a fresh fish/seafood over frozen fish/seafood is that when you get a frozen fish from a supermarket they are less healthier and do not have any nutrients in them. Fresh fish contain nutrients that are very beneficial to our health..example- Omega-3 fatty acids. Also, obviously fresh fish will taste better because you know it is not processed, atleast nearly as bad as a frozen fish...depending on where you buy the fish.. because it could have come from a fish farm..which then, it could be pumped full of hormones. But, if you buy off the docks; if your so lucky to live on a shore, or if you have access to a fish monger..thats the way to go!

Safety issue... i dont really think so, i mean you'd have to do some research, some fish you cant eat raw and you want to stear clear of eating raw at all. Some fish it is okay to eat raw...it really depends. I dont have a distinguished list in front of me, but i could probably find one.. Using a frozen fish would not hurt you though.

This is to my knowledge off the top of my head and what i found really quick... maybe someone else might know more on here?

Fish doesn't lose any Omega 3 fatty acids by being frozen. If the fish is frozen on the fishing boat, it's going to be fresher than what can be bought "fresh" for those of us further from the ocean.

BTW, I've seen previously frozen fish at fish mongers, as well as farmed fish. You gotta pay attention. Of course, if you can buy it fresh off the dock, that is really the way to go.

Farmed fish can be perfectly nice. I lived on a trout farm for a while. The fish there ate wild food for the last year before harvest. Some places want big fish in a hurry, so they feed them Trout Chow right up to harvest. Guess what those farmed trout taste like. :ermm:
 

taxlady

Chef Extraordinaire
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near Montreal, Quebec
OK. I figured as much. I am landlocked and live 100 miles from the city. Not much fresh fish around here. I have a few supermarkets which offer a decent variety of seafood products, but they are all frozen. I would be interested in trying it, even though it is not an ideal situation.
Thanks, doods.

The quality of frozen fish varies a lot. Fatty fish freeze well. Until I got worried about farmed fish from Asia, we used to buy High Liner. Their stuff tastes fresh. I'm very picky about fish. I lived in Copenhagen - lots of fresh caught fish in Copenhagen. Lots of fish in the Scandinavian diet.

High Liner does have frozen wild salmon and frozen wild cod. Haven't tried those, 'cause we have been too broke. I just wish they would write on the package where the fish were from. By law, product of Canada, only means that it has to be packaged in Canada :ermm:
 

Rocklobster

Master Chef
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Nov 10, 2010
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Location
Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
The quality of frozen fish varies a lot. Fatty fish freeze well. Until I got worried about farmed fish from Asia, we used to buy High Liner. Their stuff tastes fresh. I'm very picky about fish. I lived in Copenhagen - lots of fresh caught fish in Copenhagen. Lots of fish in the Scandinavian diet.

High Liner does have frozen wild salmon and frozen wild cod. Haven't tried those, 'cause we have been too broke. I just wish they would write on the package where the fish were from. By law, product of Canada, only means that it has to be packaged in Canada :ermm:
I have bought the frozen salmon from High Liner. It is good. I only buy it when it goes on sale for 4 bucks, down from 6.
 

justplainbill

Executive Chef
Joined
Jan 17, 2007
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4,206
Location
Eastern Long Island, New York
In the USA, "fresh" only means the fish has not been frozen. I prefer to eat fish that I have caught; second choice is "fresh" fish from a reputable monger; third is smoked fish (eg finnann haddie and lachs); and fourth canned fish. Having passed some fish cannery towns in New Brunswick, that aroma has been enough to somewhat stifle my enthusiasm for canned fish. The freshness of seafood, as well as its habitat, can have a profound effect on its flavor and texture.
 
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taxlady

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near Montreal, Quebec
How do you make your gravlax? I love the one that my friend from Greenland makes at Christmas time...

I used to use Julia Child's recipe, one I wrote down from one of her shows. It's not the one in her book, The Way to Cook. I lost the one I used to use.

I have some marinating in the fridge right now. I'm using this recipe: Gravlaks, sort of.

I'm making a much smaller amount, so I cut down all the amounts. I cut the sugar to a ratio of 3 parts salt to 2 parts sugar. I left out the carraway seeds, and I used vodka instead of akvavit or brandy. You could use lemon juice instead of the booze.

I'll post about it if it turns out good. :LOL: The recipe looks a lot like the one I used to use.
 

taxlady

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Trade you maple syrup for some gravlaks <g>. I can meet you in C'wall.

I'll probably try gravad trout next. I don't think it's as expensive as salmon. Since smoked trout is yummers, it should be good gravad.

BTW, I hate cooked salmon and cooked trout.
 

Erik.f.Dowell

Assistant Cook
Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
47
Location
maryland
Yup, I'm concerned too. That's why I freeze any fish that I'm going to use raw. A week in a home deep freezer should do it. It takes much less time in really cold commercial freezers. I googled this a while back, since I love gravad laks.

For freezing fish, being frozen does not actually kill any bacteria that may be present in the fish, but instead stops its growth, so freezing inferior grades of fish will not make it 'safe' to consume raw, the bacteria will still be there.

In regards to the farm raised fish, I wasn't talking about nice fish farms that actually take the time to give the fish natural food that it would typically eat in the wild, but rather the fish farms who are about mass-production. Most frozen shrimp you buy at a store, that come in a box are shipped over from Thailand which is the breeding ground for 80 to 90 percent of commercial seafood species..the improper production methods have devastated the natural areas surrounding Thailand and ways of production..which means who knows what we have been eating..:(
 

Erik.f.Dowell

Assistant Cook
Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
47
Location
maryland
i also love smoked fish! smoked salmon is amazing... My buddy had smoked a bluefish, which has a high oil content, and i had never really thought about a bluefish as something i would want to eat, and maaaannnnn.... delish!
 

taxlady

Chef Extraordinaire
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Sep 13, 2010
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near Montreal, Quebec
For freezing fish, being frozen does not actually kill any bacteria that may be present in the fish, but instead stops its growth, so freezing inferior grades of fish will not make it 'safe' to consume raw, the bacteria will still be there.

In regards to the farm raised fish, I wasn't talking about nice fish farms that actually take the time to give the fish natural food that it would typically eat in the wild, but rather the fish farms who are about mass-production. Most frozen shrimp you buy at a store, that come in a box are shipped over from Thailand which is the breeding ground for 80 to 90 percent of commercial seafood species..the improper production methods have devastated the natural areas surrounding Thailand and ways of production..which means who knows what we have been eating..:(

The point of freezing fish for uncooked dishes is to kill parasites. Of course it doesn't kill bacteria. Freezing just stops bacteria from growing while they are frozen.

And I seldom eat fish because I don't live close enough to the ocean to get fresh fish that I consider fresh. I used to eat frozen fish 'til I found out that most of it is from Asia. They won't allow most of the farmed fish from Asia to be sold in the EU.

It's a shame that eating fish requires so much research. I miss it.
 

Erik.f.Dowell

Assistant Cook
Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
47
Location
maryland
Agreed! It def makes things tougher.. But better knowing than to go at it blindly...

Now how about raw chicken?? When I cook with it I am a sanitation freak, and cooking it to a well done point that doesnt over cook it and dry it out... But I also heard of people getting really high grade chicken and being able to eat it sashimi style and raw... My instructor said he did it in Europe, not sure where... also heard of it in NYC... I am not the kind of person about to try something like this.. My stepdad had a run in with some raw chicken and it got the better of him
 

taxlady

Chef Extraordinaire
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Sep 13, 2010
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28,834
Location
near Montreal, Quebec
Agreed! It def makes things tougher.. But better knowing than to go at it blindly...

Now how about raw chicken?? When I cook with it I am a sanitation freak, and cooking it to a well done point that doesnt over cook it and dry it out... But I also heard of people getting really high grade chicken and being able to eat it sashimi style and raw... My instructor said he did it in Europe, not sure where... also heard of it in NYC... I am not the kind of person about to try something like this.. My stepdad had a run in with some raw chicken and it got the better of him

Don't get me started about chicken. Most of the problem has to do with how the carcasses are handled at the abattoirs. In most modern, North American abbatoirs they kill and gut the birds and then dip them in cold water to cool the birds. But, lots of birds get dipped in the same cold water. If one bird's guts were pierced or broken, that gets into the water and contaminates all the other birds. I believe it's the same problem with beef and pork.

Someone did a study and the average home has more E. coli on their kitchen counters than on their toilet seats. E. coli is associated with feces.

That's the main reason why we have to treat our meat as though it were medical waste.
 

Bolas De Fraile

Executive Chef
Joined
Oct 28, 2010
Messages
3,191
Good morning Tax, first off how do you make your mustard and dill sauce for the Grav?
2nd I was on a cruise ship in Miami and the bowls of peanuts on the bars were tested, 75 different strains of urine, 13 different strains of faeces:ohmy:
 

CWS4322

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Jan 2, 2011
Messages
13,420
Location
Rural Ottawa, Ontario
This is how we make our mustard and dill sauce:

1 T oil
1 T vinegar
1/3 tsp salt
pepper
2-3 T mustard (dry)
2-3 T sugar
LOTS of fresh, minced dill

A friend of mine mixes 2/3 c mayo to 1/3 c Dijon and tons of fresh, minced dill
 

Erik.f.Dowell

Assistant Cook
Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
47
Location
maryland
I watched a documentary about lemons in restaurants and how this organization tested 20 restaurants and over 3/4 lemons had feces and other raw meat detected on them.. Mostly due to not cleaning cutting boards or knifes used to cut other items and then used to cut lemons... Like trimming and cleaning a chicken and then with same tools cutting lemons for water....what!!?! I've also heard of people cutting lemons on the back of servers trays... So dirty with all the hands that hold that side.... The video was pretty gross
 

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