Dips for flat breads.

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Mr Mannn

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There are a ton of good ideas here for flat bread..so I am not worried about that...I looking for something to dip the bread in.



~~I remember Charlton Heston as Moses eating flatbread with dips in the tent of a sultan. It was a primitive, simple meal. I have always wanted to replicate that. It would go great camping along with veggies and meat shish kabob.



Now I won't eat Humus. Nothing that smells of dirty socks will go near my mouth. But I have loved dipping bread in my stew. Bread bowls do the same thing.



The goal is to replicate a primitive meal. There is always a cheese and hamburger dip...
we could do a simple gravy dip (biscuits and gravy are a thing).
Could we thicken Vegetable beef soup into a stew-like dip?


I'm just looking for ideas...what would you dip your flatbread in?



For the primitive meal thing, I plan on having salt as crystals that kids will need to crush in a mortar/pestle and sprinkle with their fingers. Any kinda hands on kid experience to make this fun.
 

blissful

Master Chef
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Mar 25, 2008
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5,037
Primative food was basic food.
Olive spread/dip.
Nut butters.
Guacamole.
Bean dip (pick a bean you like)
Mashed or macerated fruit (berries or bananas)
 

GotGarlic

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People have been eating flavored yogurt for millennia. Add garlic, salt and whatever fresh herbs you like. Dill and parsley are popular, or a combination.

Another option is good-quality olive oil seasoned with dried Italian herbs, hot pepper flakes, salt and pepper.
 

pepperhead212

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There are countless Indian chutneys that their flatbreads, and other things are dunked in. While most think of chutneys mostly as pickles, there are many that are like thick sauces or dips, my favorites being from southern India, many based on coconut, tomatoes, or peppers.

 

karadekoolaid

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Possible dips:
Greek yoghurt with mint, dill, cilantro and a touch of chile powder
Tsatsikis - greek yoghurt with loads of minced garlic
Mango chutney
Babaghanush (roasted eggplant with olive oil, salt, pepper , garlic and lemon)
M´Hammara (roasted red peppers, hot paprika, olive oil, ground hazelnuts, salt and a bit of sugar)
Chilpotle mayonnaise
Sour cream with roasted peppers and bacon
Sour cream with blue cheese & caramelised onion
Tapenade
Pesto

Shall I go on?:yum::yum:
 

taxlady

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There's not much that I thought to suggest that isn't already mentioned. I like a bit of tahini in my babaganoush.

Taramosalata (cured fish roe mixed with olive oil, cooked potato or moistened bread, lemon juice, and maybe some seasonings)

And for scooping, you could use some bean and corn salad. Hmm, I suppose you could use baked beans too.
 

cookieee

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Hi, I've been working on my Yogurt binder the last few days and have discovered this dip.

Garam Masala Dipping Sauce

1 cup plain low-fat yogurt
1/2 cup chopped seeded plum tomato
1/3 cup finely chopped onion
1 tsp. Garam Masala
1/4 tsp. salt
2 (6") pitas, each cut into 10 wedges

Combine first 5 ingredients in a bowl. Cover and chill 1 hour. Serve with Pita wedges

This dip is also great with chicken skewers or vegetables.

Source: Cooking Light mag. March 2002
 

taxlady

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I think of tzatziki as having more flavor from minced cucumber, dill and mint than from garlic (although it does contain garlic).

I think that's the more authentic version. Around here, it's usually light on the cucumber (if they put any in at all) and heavy on the garlic. I only recently figured out why I didn't really care for the various tzatziki recipes I have tried making. It's because they are much heavier on the cucumber than what I like and am used to. Kenji mentioned in a video that for the dish he was making (I think it was souvlaki, but I don't remember for sure) he preferred garlic sauce rather than tzatziki that he has had in Greece.
 

GotGarlic

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I think that's the more authentic version. Around here, it's usually light on the cucumber (if they put any in at all) and heavy on the garlic. I only recently figured out why I didn't really care for the various tzatziki recipes I have tried making. It's because they are much heavier on the cucumber than what I like and am used to. Kenji mentioned in a video that for the dish he was making (I think it was souvlaki, but I don't remember for sure) he preferred garlic sauce rather than tzatziki that he has had in Greece.
I love cucumbers, so I love the traditional tzatziki :yum:
 

taxlady

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I love cucumbers, so I love the traditional tzatziki :yum:

I really like cucumber. I just find it overwhelms the tzatziki. Or maybe, it's because I'm not used to it in the "tzatziki" I have been eating for forty years. Also, DH really doesn't care for cucumber. Maybe I would like it better in Greece.
 

GotGarlic

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I really like cucumber. I just find it overwhelms the tzatziki. Or maybe, it's because I'm not used to it in the "tzatziki" I have been eating for forty years. Also, DH really doesn't care for cucumber. Maybe I would like it better in Greece.
Interesting. I've never thought of cucumber as an overwhelming flavor in anything. I love it, but it's pretty delicate. If the tzatziki is made right, the flavors should be well balanced. And sure - anything would taste better in an exotic place like Greece ;)
 

karadekoolaid

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I think of tzatziki as having more flavor from minced cucumber, dill and mint than from garlic (although it does contain garlic).
Yes, I missed out the cucumber, which obviously should be there.
However, the addition of dill and mint is, apparently, not common in Greece, but OUTSIDE Greece. Maybe in India with Raita? ( I put dill in Raita).
Just what I read, although I clearly remember the tzatziki in Mykonos was heavy on the garlic!
 

GotGarlic

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Yes, I missed out the cucumber, which obviously should be there.

However, the addition of dill and mint is, apparently, not common in Greece, but OUTSIDE Greece. Maybe in India with Raita? ( I put dill in Raita).

Just what I read, although I clearly remember the tzatziki in Mykonos was heavy on the garlic!
Apparently? What do you base that on?

This recipe is from a registered dietician in Greece. It doesn't include mint but it does have dill.

https://www.olivetomato.com/tzatziki-the-original-recipe-and-how-to-make-it-lighter/
 

karadekoolaid

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Apparently? What do you base that on?

This recipe is from a registered dietician in Greece. It doesn't include mint but it does have dill.

https://www.olivetomato.com/tzatziki-the-original-recipe-and-how-to-make-it-lighter/
Apparently because (a) I don´t live in Greece (b) I don´t speak Greek and (c) haven´t got any Greek chef friends.
When ever I check on a dish which is supposed to be "authentic", I look at at least 10 ethnic websites (in this case, Greek) and avoid any sites,blogs, u-tubes, etc., which are written by non-Greek authors.
Of the 10 sites I visited, more than half did NOT use dill; three of them actually said "Most recipes outside Greece also call for mint or dill. This is not authentic or something similar.
When I write "apparently", it´s on the basis of background research, especially where such a popular dish is concerned.
If your dietician wants to put dill in it, then great. I´m not saying it tastes bad (I love the herb), only that "apparently" it´s not totally authentic.
 

pepperhead212

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This thread made me go find a CB I have - the only Greek CB I ever got that I really liked, and it is definitely authentic. It is The Olive And The Caper - Adventures In Greek Cooking, by Susanna Hoffman. I remembered recipes in there using both dill and mint, and both are mentioned on a page titled The Herbs of Greece, listing 24 herbs - the Greeks love their herbs! And another page is titled Oregano, Dill, and Mint, in which she describes how much these herbs are used, as well as grown, by the Greeks. In many regions they grow as weeds, as any of us that have grown them can relate to! :LOL:

 

cookwewill

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Here in my part of the world, spreads are more popular than dips... and we eat them with any kind of bread, including the flat types.

The base is usually butter and cheese and then it's all about fantasy, you can add pretty much anything to the base... boiled eggs, onions, chives... finely chopped and mixed. Or a can of tuna+ketchup+mustard+onions. Or cream cheese+feta+paprika+sour cream.

This is an extremely popular type of food to eat for breakfast.
 

GotGarlic

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This thread made me go find a CB I have - the only Greek CB I ever got that I really liked, and it is definitely authentic. It is The Olive And The Caper - Adventures In Greek Cooking, by Susanna Hoffman. I remembered recipes in there using both dill and mint, and both are mentioned on a page titled The Herbs of Greece, listing 24 herbs - the Greeks love their herbs! And another page is titled Oregano, Dill, and Mint, in which she describes how much these herbs are used, as well as grown, by the Greeks. In many regions they grow as weeds, as any of us that have grown them can relate to! [emoji38]



Thanks, pepper. That's what I've learned about Greek and other Mediterranean cooking, especially those that were occupied by the Ottoman Empire for several hundred years. Using lots of fresh herbs is common in Turkey and they took the recipes from the Sultan's kitchens with them to parts of Europe.
 
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