Do some Europeans really eat kitchen detergent?

The friendliest place on the web for anyone that enjoys cooking.
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

kenny1999

Senior Cook
Joined
Jan 18, 2012
Messages
394
Location
Far East
I have been hearing that some Europeans wash their dishes with detergent but they don't rinse them afterwards and let the detergent sit for hours, later when they cook again, they just use the dishes to serve without rinsing, practically eating up the detergent.

Is it real or fake information?
 
Last edited:

thymeless

Senior Cook
Joined
Aug 12, 2006
Messages
381
Sounds fake to me from my experiences there.

But given human diversity you could probably find someone who does that.
 

blissful

Master Chef
Joined
Mar 25, 2008
Messages
5,066
It sounds like someone slacking on rinsing the dishes! Maybe they have a water shortage? Rinsing is important and I wouldn't advise slacking on it.
 

taxlady

Chef Extraordinaire
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Sep 13, 2010
Messages
29,264
Location
near Montreal, Quebec
When I lived in Denmark, I saw dishes placed directly on the dish rack after being washed and not rinsed. I was a little shocked. I didn't say anything at to our host, but I mentioned it to my mother later. She said that some people do their dishes that way. I had not noticed any untoward flavours when I had eaten supper on those dishes. I once heard that dishwashing detergent slides right off the plates and doesn't actually leave a residue of detergent behind. I don't know if that's true. I rinse my dishes after washing them.

I got curious. From a Wikipedia article about Dishwashing liquid,
Hand dishwashing detergents utilize surfactants to play the primary role in cleaning.[4] The reduced surface tension of dishwashing water, and increasing solubility of modern surfactant mixtures, allows the water to run off the dishes in a dish rack very quickly. However, most people also rinse the dishes with pure water to make sure to get rid of any soap residue that could affect the taste of the food.
 

kenny1999

Senior Cook
Joined
Jan 18, 2012
Messages
394
Location
Far East
When I lived in Denmark, I saw dishes placed directly on the dish rack after being washed and not rinsed. I was a little shocked. I didn't say anything at to our host, but I mentioned it to my mother later. She said that some people do their dishes that way. I had not noticed any untoward flavours when I had eaten supper on those dishes. I once heard that dishwashing detergent slides right off the plates and doesn't actually leave a residue of detergent behind. I don't know if that's true. I rinse my dishes after washing them.

I got curious. From a Wikipedia article about Dishwashing liquid,
I've read the article, but I will still rinse my dishes with water after all, I can't believe that all the detergent will go away on its own without any rinsing.
 

pepperhead212

Executive Chef
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
3,758
Location
Woodbury, NJ
I can't believe it slides off on its own, either. Think about this - dishwashing liquid is often used in gardening, partly to help emulsify oils when spraying them, but also to help the substance sprayed to stick to the leaves. So it definitely does not all run off!
 

Badjak

Senior Cook
Joined
Dec 24, 2010
Messages
189
We just washed and dried with tea towel.
Student time for sure, washing and letting it dry in the rack. Maybe tea towel if things were a little wet before putting them away.
Still the same now and I'm still alive :)
Even worse, I very often use no dish washer, just hot water
 

IC 2.0

Cook
Joined
Aug 17, 2022
Messages
84
Location
Honolulu, HI
A while back, I asked this of a coworker who was born and raised in England (Wokingham I believe if my memory is correct) and he confirmed this is a common habit--letting dishes dry without rinsing off the soap.

He then said to me, "Why do you think the food in England has such a bad reputation for tasting horrible?" :ROFLMAO:
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom