Do you have a favorite herb, or spice, so some combination

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Andy M.

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When I wrote PURE chili powder I meant PURE not a blend. I will make powders from ancho, guajillo, New Mexican, cascabell, mulato, pasilla and arbol. Japones aren't as available here as arbol. I like experimenting with different combos. Cumin for sure, paprika not so much. I also don't put beans in chili, but I do put chilis in my beans.

I always use the rule that if it's spelled 'chile' powder it's meant to be just dried ground chiles. If it's spelled 'chili' powder, it's a seasoning blend including chile powder, cumin, oregano, etc.
 

CraigC

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I don't spell it with an "E" at the end. I've also never heard of that being the case. nor that rule.
 

Andy M.

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Didn't you just make a distinction between chile powder and chili powder? Or do you mean it's just the name of a country when "chile" is capitalized?

Just that the word chile can have more than one meaning. Capitalized it's the name of a country. Lower case it's a category of peppers.
 

pepperhead212

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Besides the name of a country, chile is the Spanish name for peppers - i.e. chile ancho. Chili is probably the bastardized English version, and eventually became the name of the dish. Sometimes I see both used in the same article or book, and not for different things!

Another of those you say tomato, I say tomato things, except somebody changed the spelling way back! lol
 
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skilletlicker

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Just that the word chile can have more than one meaning. Capitalized it's the name of a country. Lower case it's a category of peppers.
In some quarters and in a certain tone, it means a kid has a whoopin' in his future if he doesn't straighten up.
 

GotGarlic

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Besides the name of a country, chile is the Spanish name for peppers - i.e. chile ancho. Chili is probably the bastardized English version, and eventually became the name of the dish. Sometimes I see both used in the same article or book, and not for different things!

Another of those you say tomato, I say tomato things, except somebody changed the spelling way back! lol
No, chili is the name of the dish made with chili powder, which includes chiles [emoji2] Interestingly, the Spanish word chile is based on the Nahuatl (an indigenous Mexican language) word chilli [emoji892]

This is why writers need copy editors, but, since publishing is so easy these days, people often skip the editing process.
 
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taxlady

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Just that the word chile can have more than one meaning. Capitalized it's the name of a country. Lower case it's a category of peppers.

Which was why I wrote, " I thought "Chile" was just the name of a country." including the word "just". But, I see from further posts, that it is also used for the pepper, which I vaguely remember from years ago.
 

caseydog

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I use all sorts of spice and herbs and my faves are usually fresh herbs but that said, there is one seasoning mix that I use often for roasted meats - especially chicken and almost anything that needs a little boost.. Embarrassingly simple and comes in a cool can - I especially like the white pepper blend.

https://www.amazon.com/Walker-Slap-Ya-Mama-Seasoning/dp/B00KYH9VYU

View attachment 35407

I can buy Slap Ya Mama locally at most grocery stores. I have some of the yellow can, and it is good in small amounts. It is quite salty.

CD
 

profnot

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I love cardamom, freshly ground fine. The Scandinavians use it in pastry, similar to the way we use cinnamon.

I like cardamom mixed with freshly shaved nutmeg, ground cloves, and vanilla in pumpkin pie and spice cake. On a cold morning, these spices in warm almond milk is lovely.
 

larry_stewart

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I love cardamom, freshly ground fine. The Scandinavians use it in pastry, similar to the way we use cinnamon.

I like cardamom mixed with freshly shaved nutmeg, ground cloves, and vanilla in pumpkin pie and spice cake. On a cold morning, these spices in warm almond milk is lovely.

Ive had cardamom cookies , which were fabulous
I also love some Indian desserts, which also have a strong presence to cardamom.
There was this carrot pudding type dish, which I tried cause it was the only desert on the buffet line. I was hesitant at first, but it was absolutely delicious.

Also, the gulab balls ( Gulab Jamun) which are a fried soft cheese ball in a sweet , sugary rose petal/ cardamom flavored syrup.
 

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