Egg Opener

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Konditor

Senior Cook
Joined
Sep 28, 2004
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153
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Northeastern Seaboard
I would like to purchase one of those made-in-France devices used to remove the top caps from fresh eggs: It's a stainless-steel, spring-loaded tool with a plunger that is drawn up & released onto the small-end of an egg -- thus removing the cap cleanly without damaging the rest of the shell. Ideal for creating a natural cup in which to serve, e.g., vodka sabayon!

Do you know of an online vendor currently offering this item?
 

PA Baker

Master Chef
Joined
Sep 1, 2004
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5,998
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USA, Pennsylvania
I know Gourmet had a small article on these devices a couple of issues ago. Maybe you can find something on their site, www.epicurious.com or see if your library has back articles. When I get home tonight, I'll check and see if I still have it.
 

Konditor

Senior Cook
Joined
Sep 28, 2004
Messages
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Location
Northeastern Seaboard
Michael: Thank you for your assistance!

Incidentally, have you ever cooked Jena eggs? It's a rather uncommon method in egg cookery: It can be prepared successfully only in a special container called an Eierkocher, made by the Jenaer Glaswerk Schott & Gen., at Mainz in Germany. A couple of months ago, I e-mailed an inquiry to the US rep for the company, but to no avail. A basic recipe instructs the cook to place 1 fl. oz. cream in the bottom of the tiny, single-egg-size container, add some freshly ground pepper & a little salt. (For variety, one can add a little salmon, creamed shrimp, or bacon & mushrooms.) Next, the top of each container is closed & fixed w/ a spring clip. Then the containers are placed in a pan of simmering water which comes just to the base of the clips. The pan is covered and the eggs are cooked for no more than 5 minutes for medium doneness. The eggs are served in the glass Jena containers, w/ a sprinkling of fresh herbs.

Where does one buy these Eierkochers?

Best Regards,
Lawrence
 

mudbug

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Sep 9, 2004
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Konditor, I don't know if the Eierkochen-cooked eggs turn out differently because of being covered, but I make these for Christmas morning quite often, in little 4 oz ramekins:

Preheat oven to 400. Melt a teaspoon of butter in a ramekin. Add a tablespoon of half and half. Crack one large egg into ramekin and cover with a heaping tablespoon of grated Havarti. Sprinkle with dill. Bake for 10-12 minutes until set.
 

Michael in FtW

Master Chef
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Fort Worth, TX
I've heard of Jena eggs - and I've heard of the Eierkochers (think the ones I heard about were made of glass) - but these are a German thing that are going to be hard to find in the US.

Since they are just covered egg poachers ... I would modify what my good friend mudbug said slightly. Just use a ramikin - but cover it with foil - and cook it in the oven in a water-bath (what the French would call a bain marie).

What do you think mudbug?
 

mudbug

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Sep 9, 2004
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NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Why thank you, Michael, for your kind words. BTW, you always sound so genial that it would be hard for anyone not to want to be YOUR friend.
 

Konditor

Senior Cook
Joined
Sep 28, 2004
Messages
153
Location
Northeastern Seaboard
Micheal & Mudbug, et.al. -- The preparation to which I've referred, ought to be cooked only in those glass Eierkochers. (Of course, it may be something of a vanity, like coveting one of those copper tart tatin pans!) I interpret the description of your egg dishes as being akin to shirred eggs, oeufs sur la plat. However, the distinctions may be so fine that they're unprofitable to debate further.

Regards,
Lawrence
 

Michael in FtW

Master Chef
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Sep 5, 2004
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Fort Worth, TX
Lawrence,

The Eierkocher (egg cooker) you have described is a German glass egg poacher which has a lid. From what I can understand, my German isn't so good, they are made by Schott Glassworks. "TRUE" Jena eggs can only be made using this device. Of course, on the other side of the coin, you can't make real Texas chili unless you use Carroll Shelby chili mix and a cast iron dutch oven.
 

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