Farm Fresh Eggs

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DampCharcoal

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Apr 10, 2004
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Johnstown, Ohio
Whenever possible, I buy eggs from a neighbor down the road. They're great but I've noticed that the yolk is a darker "orange" color and the white seems thicker. I've never had any problems, just wondered what causes the difference?
 

PA Baker

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USA, Pennsylvania
Damp, I don't know why, but I've had the same thing--for about 6 months of the year, I belong to an organic farm co-op. We get weekly shares of produce and a dozen eggs. The eggs always have darker--almost orange-- yolks compared to grocery store eggs. They taste much richer, too.

I remember seeing a Martha Stewart segment on how her chickens lay eggs with differently shaded shells (cream, white, hint of green or gray, etc) depending on what she feeds them. Maybe the type and quality of feed have something to do with it?
 

DampCharcoal

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That makes sense. The eggs I get have a brown/muave colored shell similar to what you see in the store but just tastes better. Thanks for the info! Unfortunately, I live about six miles from the Buckeye Egg Farms, a MASSIVE complex that's scattered over two counties and when the wind blows just right, PHEW! Hold your nose!
 

choclatechef

Washing Up
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Farm eggs, where the chickens are not always confined are a deeper yellow yolk due to the varied diet the chickens have.

The chickens have a chance to scavenge for bugs, grass, grain, etc. This rich natural diet changes the yolk color.
 

Catseye

Senior Cook
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Oct 30, 2004
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USA,Virginia
Chickens that get yellow or orange flower petals in their diet produce those deep yellow yolks. These flowers contain a substance called xanophyll or something like that, I'm not recalling the exact word, and that's what contributes the rich color.

Long ago in an animal husbandry course, the instructor told us that the dark yellow or orangey-yellow yolks are not superior to pale yellow ones nutritionally, nor do they cause an improvement in flavor. But I've always had my doubts about the latter.

As for the thick whites, that's all good. It means the eggs are very fresh.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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While living in Spokane, I had Cornish Cross chickens. i was told that they produced large, more meaty chickens, but that the egg production would not be as good as with other breeds. We always had more eggs than we knew what to do with. The chickens were very large. We fed them grain feed, starch water from when we made fresh flour from Whole Wheat, and they caught insects, mice, or whatever little critter happened to invade the coupe. I once saw these hens go after a live rat that came by from the forest. It was dead and eaten in a matter of seconds, literally.

My hens were not fed corn, nor any blossoms with yellow petals. And yet, the yolks were a deerp orange/yellow color, and the eggs were large and firm, with an all-white shell.

I have to think, based on experience with these chickens, that the varied diet, increased exercise, and subnsequent improved health contributed to the quality and flavor of both the eggs, and the chickens.

But I am not a proficient farmer, and haven't had chickens in a very long time. So this is based on memory, and not very scientific observations. Take with a grain of salt.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
 

marmalady

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Ooooh, rat-killing chickens! Maybe we should alert inner-city officials of this - could solve two problems at once - provide a food source for low income families, and get rid of the rat problems! :)
 

SierraCook

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Sierra Valley, Northern California, USA
We used to feed our chickens cracked corn and oyster shells. The shells helped to strengthen the egg shells. The yolks were also the typical yellow. Hens are very protective of their eggs and roosters are very protective of the hens. I have scars from doing battles with hens that did not want me to collect their eggs and the roosters that thought I was hurting their hens. But there is nothing like farm fresh eggs and meat. We used to raise pigs, also. Yummy!!
 

kyles

Head Chef
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Dec 13, 2003
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UK
Healthy happy hens produce deep yellow yolks. The corn doesn't hurt, however non corn fed chooks (Australian term there) produce very yellow yolks, fresh grass, wheat and other good things help that.

I used to help my mum in law look after her chooks, I love keeping poultry and can't wait to have room to keep my own birds.
 

Audeo

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I have a Welsh pal who raises "Araconna" (likely misspelled, sorry) chickens way down south of the city. The shells are always a bright green and the yolks are an almost brownish orange. These eggs are SO delicious!!! And they will absolutely RUIN a person for buying commercial eggs! They taste so much better, they thicken so much better, and they bake in any recipe so much better!

I wish we were closer and I could get them more often! Alas, it's a 2-hour drive for either of us...but seven or eight times a year, you can hear me whooping for joy!
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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Audeo said:
I have a Welsh pal who raises "Araconna" (likely misspelled, sorry) chickens way down south of the city. The shells are always a bright green and the yolks are an almost brownish orange. These eggs are SO delicious!!! And they will absolutely RUIN a person for buying commercial eggs! They taste so much better, they thicken so much better, and they bake in any recipe so much better!

I wish we were closer and I could get them more often! Alas, it's a 2-hour drive for either of us...but seven or eight times a year, you can hear me whooping for joy!

I am jealous, or maybe envious is a better term. ;)

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
 

Audeo

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Goodweed of the North said:
I am jealous, or maybe envious is a better term. ;)

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

LOL! Actually, I'm quite envious of them for having the opportunity to have those eggs daily!
 

Claire

Master Chef
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Sep 4, 2004
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Location
Galena, IL
When I get eggs from a freind rather than the store, the yolks are more yellow. I've heard of feeding chickens marigold petals to darken the yolk, but can't remember where I heard or read of it.
 

leigh

Senior Cook
Joined
Jun 16, 2002
Messages
148
Location
Eastern Kansas
Hear, hear! I was raised on homegrown almost-everything and the difference is astounding. I have this fantasy of having a little piece of ground where I can have chickens and a garden and a goat and a pig and a few ducks and a watch goose or two and tons of flowers and some fruit and betties and nuts . . .
 

aussie girl

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Feb 1, 2005
Messages
148
Location
Australia
re: Farm fresh eggs

Hi All,
I'm new here and was just reading through this thread (have 2 pet chooks too). The discussion about diet/yolk color reminded me of another experience when I was a child. If you feed the cows beetroot, you will get pink milk. I seen it with my own eyes, when my dear grandmother threw some beetroot that had gone to seed, over the fence. Unbeknown to her, the house cow thought it was delicious, and the result the following day was pink milk. :D
 

buckytom

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Aug 19, 2004
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My mountain
that is so cool aussiegirl. please :D please :D please tell me it works with chocolate too!!!!!!!!!!!
 

aussie girl

Senior Cook
Joined
Feb 1, 2005
Messages
148
Location
Australia
Farm fresh eggs

Sorry, buckytom, I think it would only apply to the colouring of the milk, not the flavour.... damn ;)
 

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