Frypan confusion

The friendliest place on the web for anyone that enjoys cooking.
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

Shane68

Assistant Cook
Joined
Sep 1, 2022
Messages
15
Location
Eindhoven
Hello,

I recently bought a Tefal Excellence frypan for general cooking which I think is made of Aluminum. The first thing I noticed is that it is slow to heat up on gas compared to other pans I have used it. It is advertised as having a Titanium Anti-scratch 6x non-stick layer and I wonder if that is the cause of the slow heating experience. For me, having fast and even heat conduction is more useful that having a non-stick surface. I understood Aluminum is second only to Copper for heat conduction, however Copper pans cost about 3 times more. Do I any other option for faster heating?
 
Last edited:

Katie H

Site Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 11, 2006
Messages
16,543
Location
I live in the Heartland of the United States
For great heat retention and quick heating, cast iron can't be beat. Plus, if seasoned properly and used often it can become as non-stick as the most expensive Teflon cookware.

I've gotten many of my pieces at thrift shops, yard sales, etc. for pennies. Sometimes they look pretty rough but, since I have a self-cleaning oven, I just put my cruddy piece into the oven and turn the cycle to "clean." In no time I have a blank canvas to season.

Love my cast iron.
 

Andy M.

Certified Pretend Chef
Joined
Sep 1, 2004
Messages
49,602
Location
Massachusetts
Your statement goes against all I know about pans. An aluminum pan should heat up faster than pans made of other materials regardless of coating.

However, since it is induction compatible, there is more on the bottom of you pan than just aluminum. I suspect that whatever they added to the bottom of the pan to make it induction compatible is causing the slower heating.
 

dcSaute

Sous Chef
Joined
Apr 24, 2011
Messages
918
Hello,

I recently bought a Tefal Excellence frypan for general cooking which I think is made of Aluminum. The first thing I noticed is that it is slow to heat up on gas compared to other pans I have used it. It is advertised as having a Titanium Anti-scratch 6x non-stick layer and I wonder if that is the cause of the slow heating experience. For me, having fast and even heat conduction is more useful that having a non-stick surface. I understood Aluminum is second only to Copper for heat conduction, however Copper pans cost about 3 times more. Do I any other option for faster heating?


faster heating relates to the specific heat factor - which is entirely different from the "conduction" factor. specific heat is a function of _mass_ where as conductivity is a function of thickness.



aluminum takes much more heat to get hot - per _POUND_ - than copper.
cast iron does not heat up quickly - period.
but the 'quickness' depends on the mass - and you will not find a lot of aluminum based pans that are as heavy as copper or cast iron.


as mentioned by others - likely some exotic construction in the pan bottom so it works with induction is the cause of the slow heating.
 
Last edited:

Shane68

Assistant Cook
Joined
Sep 1, 2022
Messages
15
Location
Eindhoven
Your statement goes against all I know about pans. An aluminum pan should heat up faster than pans made of other materials regardless of coating.

However, since it is induction compatible, there is more on the bottom of you pan than just aluminum. I suspect that whatever they added to the bottom of the pan to make it induction compatible is causing the slower heating.

I suspect you are correct. Induction seems to be the popular trend and I may well switch during my next kitchen upgrade but for now I have gas.
 

Shane68

Assistant Cook
Joined
Sep 1, 2022
Messages
15
Location
Eindhoven
For great heat retention and quick heating, cast iron can't be beat. Plus, if seasoned properly and used often it can become as non-stick as the most expensive Teflon cookware.

I've gotten many of my pieces at thrift shops, yard sales, etc. for pennies. Sometimes they look pretty rough but, since I have a self-cleaning oven, I just put my cruddy piece into the oven and turn the cycle to "clean." In no time I have a blank canvas to season.

Love my cast iron.

Thanks, I will give cast iron a try.
 

Badjak

Senior Cook
Joined
Dec 24, 2010
Messages
139
Much as I love cast iron, it does not heat up quick!
Maybe try another non stick pan? Or a plain aluminium frying pan.
Or carbon steel. Note: carbon steel can become almost non stick with the right initial treatment
 

summer57

Senior Cook
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Messages
283
Location
Vancouver
The only exotic metal on the bottom of your pan that makes it induction-friendly would be steel, and steel doesn't heat up as quickly as copper or aluminum.

These days, I don't bother with non-stick pans, and use carbon steel - du Buyer & Darto. A properly-seasoned carbon steel pan can take high heat and doesn't stick.

That's why they use carbon steel in pro kitchens. I have an induction range, so can't use my copper anymore. Induction, though, heats so quickly that I don't miss the copper.
 

CharlieD

Master Chef
Joined
Oct 17, 2004
Messages
9,950
Location
USA,Minnesota

That's why they use carbon steel in pro kitchens. I have an induction range, so can't use my copper anymore. Induction, though, heats so quickly that I don't miss the copper.



let me ask you a question, how long the stove stays hot after it’s turned off?
You know, like electric stove stays hot.
 

summer57

Senior Cook
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Messages
283
Location
Vancouver
let me ask you a question, how long the stove stays hot after it’s turned off?
You know, like electric stove stays hot.

The burner doesn't get hot, it's the pan that gets hot. The hot pan can transfer warmth to the cooktop, but not hot enough to burn. It's a totally different kind of heating.

I love induction because it responds instantly - for example, it boils water within a minute, but drops to a simmer immediately when I turn it down. And, it stays at that simmer, so it's perfect for poaching. I can set it to a temperature; for example, it has a setting for 'melt chocolate', and it stays there.
 
Top Bottom