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Foodie

Assistant Cook
Joined
May 3, 2007
Messages
8
Location
USA; Down South
Hello you lovely posters. I stumbled onto this site 2 days ago while looking for a cudighi recipe; everyone seemed so nice I had to join. I look forward to learning a thing or 2 here.
 

PytnPlace

Sous Chef
Joined
Nov 5, 2006
Messages
801
Location
Ohio
Welcome Foodie! I'm glad you found us! Now, I curious, what is a cudighi? You stumped me on that one.
 

Foodie

Assistant Cook
Joined
May 3, 2007
Messages
8
Location
USA; Down South
Katie E is indeed correct; it's an un-cured pork sausage that's heavily spiced. Found mostly in the eastern Upper Peninsula of Michigan and as rare as hen's teeth anywhere else. Ya, sure. You betcha: it's good, eh.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

Certified/Certifiable
Joined
Aug 26, 2004
Messages
12,454
Location
USA,Michigan
Cudighi, though I haven't had the pleasure, is a spicy - sweet Itallian sausage that originated in Northern Italy. It generally doesn't use fennel and is a sweeter sausage than you pungeant and salty sausages found in Southern Italy.

Cudighi is found in the towns of Ispeming, and Iron Mountain, and a few other places where there is a concentration of Itallian/American Imigrants. The sausage itself can be found in bulk form and in pre-made links.

Dudighi is also the name of a sandwich that uses cuhdigi sausage on a hogie bun. It is usually covered with tomato sauce, mozarella cheese, and depending on where you get it, may have cooked onion and green bell pepper, or raw onion.

I have included three seperate ingredient lists for making your own cudighi sausage.

Sweet Cudighi
6 lb. pork butt
2 T. salt
1 tsp. pepper
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1/2 tsp. allspice
1/2 -1 C. dry red wine
6 garlic cloves
1 cinnamon stick
1 clove



Cudighi Made with Fennel Seed
6 lb coarsley ground pork(pork butt recommended)
1 clove garlic chooped fine
1 T. Crused red pepper
6 T. Salt
1-2 T. fennel seed


6 lb. pork butt
2 T. salt
1 tsp. pepper
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1/2 tsp. allspice
1/2 to 1 C. dry red wine
6 garlic cloves
1 cinnamon stick
1 clove

In all of these recipes, the pork is fresh and the sausage is cooked, not cured. Once the meat is ground twice through a coarse grinding disk, the spices and wine are added. Thoroughly mix eveything together, seal in a large plastic freezer bag, and refrigerate for three days, or fill suasage casings with the sausage mixture and let sit in the fridge for three days. At the end of that period, go ahead and cook your sausage out on the girll, or in the oven, or even in a frying pan.


I'm going to try one or all of these recipes. They sound good to me, expecially on top of a whole wheat hogie bun with some spicy tomato sauce and fresh mozzarella, or maybe provolone..

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
 

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