Gruyere Cheese - What can i do with this?

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Mylegsbig

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I bought some Gruyere cheese, may be mispelled i apologize. I was going to use it like a deli cheese, to slice up with crackers and meats and what not. Being that it's not that type of cheese as i now see, i'd like to do something with it. Maybe some stuffed chicken breasts or something? Anyone have any idea what i can do with this cheese? Thanks in advance!
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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In flavor, and texture, I find Gruyere to be almost a cross between a good Swiss and Parmesan. It would work great with both Itallian and French dishes. For instance, I believe it would be an outstanding cheese grated and spread into a lasagna, or grated over a ragu. But then again, it would make an amazing substitue for Swiss Cheese in a Rueben Sandwich. I would combine it with Mozarella on a pizza, or just eat thin slices of it with strawberries.

It would also be good served in thin slices to go with summer sausage or salami on buttery crackers such as Ritz.

Use your imagination and taste test this amazing cheese with other ingredients in your mind. You are sure to come up with winning combinations.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

P.S. If you haven't yet tried Havarti, or Muenster, you don't know what you are missing.
 

jennyema

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Yum! Gruyere is a favorite of mine.

It is a type of swiss cheese and quite versatile. In France, a similar cheese is called Compte. It can't be called gruyere if it isn't from Switzerland.

Great melting cheese. Great with emmenthaler ior jarlsberg in fondue.

If you like french onion soup, good gruyere is an excellent topper. Another good way to use it is croque monsieur, a type of grilled ham and cheese sandwich. http://frenchfood.about.com/library/weekly/aa010403a.htm

It is great in fritattas, quiche, tarts, etc.

If you like cauliflower, this recipe rocks: http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_23566,00.html
 

Mylegsbig

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Goodweed of the North said:
In flavor, and texture, I find Gruyere to be almost a cross between a good Swiss and Parmesan. It would work great with both Itallian and French dishes. For instance, I believe it would be an outstanding cheese grated and spread into a lasagna, or grated over a ragu. But then again, it would make an amazing substitue for Swiss Cheese in a Rueben Sandwich. I would combine it with Mozarella on a pizza, or just eat thin slices of it with strawberries.

It would also be good served in thin slices to go with summer sausage or salami on buttery crackers such as Ritz.

Use your imagination and taste test this amazing cheese with other ingredients in your mind. You are sure to come up with winning combinations.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

P.S. If you haven't yet tried Havarti, or Muenster, you don't know what you are missing.

I'm a big fan of Muenster! Great stuff. I remember trying Havarti when i was younger, and liking it, havent tried it again since i started cooking, and experimenting with food. I'm going to get some very soon, along with Gouda. I heard Gouda was awesome with deli meats on crackers. I'm going to make a home made spaghetti meat sauce, and you're saying it would be good shredded on top of this with say capellini or thin spaghetti? Any more suggestions? Feel free to keep them coming i'm trying to learn ^^
 

jennyema

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IMO, gruyere may not be the best kind of cheese to grate on top of pasta with sauce...


Plus, it has a wonderful, sort of assertive nutty taste that you wouldn't want to hide with sauce. I'd maybe make cheese bread to serve alongside the pasta with it.
 

Mylegsbig

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jennyema said:
IMO, gruyere may not be the best kind of cheese to grate on top of pasta with sauce...


Plus, it has a wonderful, sort of assertive nutty taste that you wouldn't want to hide with sauce. I'd maybe make cheese bread to serve alongside the pasta with it.

I saw some recipe in a book for stuffed chicken breasts, that had gruyere stuffed in there, with spinach and hazelnuts. But im not too fond of those ingredients, maybe i can find another stuffed chicken breast recipe for it? Hopefully someone will chime in.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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jenyemma; I guess it just depends on personal taste. For me, the Gruyere works with a tomato-based pasta, especially when grated over top. But I do relinquish the fact that the nutty, almost sweet character could clash with some of the herbs used in many pasta dishes. I think this would work with a simple sauce made from canned, diced-tomatoes, a bit of salt and pepper, onion slices, and garlic.

As with any flavors, a ballance must be maintained.

But your suggestions and opinions are every bit as valid as my own. We simply have differing tastes, as well as different experiences :) . And that's a good thing. It allows us both to offer something.

Mylegsbig; My advice to you is the same as always. Try the cheese first by itself. Become aware of its unique flavor, its texture. Then play with it in your mind. Try to imagine it with other flavors. Then give it a go. make up your own mind. You are the person who must like the end result.

Jennyemma is a wonderful contributer on this site, and has both experience and imagination, which comes through in her postings. Don't dismiss lightly the advice she gives. But then again, we all have differing likes and dislikes. I love cinimon (sp), nutmeg, and Splenda in my French toast batter. My wife cringes at the resultant flavor. She likes only the egg, salt, and milk to make up her batter.

With that said, I say goodnight.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
 

Mylegsbig

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jennyema

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Abosolutley!

You need to develop your own tastes. There aren't that many rules in cooking, and most of them have to do with chemistry or technique, not flavor combinations.

Goodweed, you can make french toast for ME anytime!!
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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Jennyemma; Living close enough to you to make that French Toast would be great. It is probably a good thing we are seperated by great distance, as my own daughters are co creative and wonderful cooks that I am almost overwhelmed by the richness of foods available in my home, or at my eldest daughter's home. If we lived near each other, I would be spending so much time playing in the kitchen, I'd never get anything else done. Cooking is fun and is an extraordinary way to amuse oneself, especially if you have someone else nearby who is passionate about food.

I already spend too much time on the subject. I sometimes imagine myself in a huge field, with all of my DC freinds around, each of us with good barbecues and cooking equipment, putting on a feed at some grand festival for the lucky community around us. That would be so much fun. Too bad I'm not Bill Gates, with virtually unlimited resources. It woud then be more than just a dream. :chef:

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
 

norgeskog

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Gruyere is great as one of the cheeses in a 3-4 cheese mac and cheese (homemade) or in a savory bread pudding. Great in a sandwich with ham.
 

spryte

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Mylegsbig said:
I saw some recipe in a book for stuffed chicken breasts, that had gruyere stuffed in there, with spinach and hazelnuts. But im not too fond of those ingredients, maybe i can find another stuffed chicken breast recipe for it? Hopefully someone will chime in.

MMMMMM... I stuff chicken breasts with gruyere, baby spinach and prociutto and serve with a mushroom sauce.
 

Claire

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Have I missed someone already saying this? Gruyere and Emmenthal are traditional topping for French onion soup. I cheat when I make mine -- slice some good hearthy baguettes, cover with the cheese and broil. Husband makes the soup, and we just plop the slices of cheese covered baguette into the bowl. But pretty much what you'd use swiss for. I, too, use it in stuffed chicken (or turkey, veal or pork loin cutlets) with some sort of good thin sliced ham and a sage leaf if I have it in the garden.
 

RPCookin

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Gruyère is also excellent for omelettes. Mix fresh minced herbs (parsley, chives, tarragon, chervil) into the eggs, then add a handful of shredded Gruyere just before you roll it up and onto the warm plate. :)
 

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