Help needed identifying Kitchen tools from mid 1900's

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Andy M.

Certified Pretend Chef
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Gee, thanks for a link to a search. If I had wanted to look at a bunch of stuff, I would have done that myself. I thought you were linking to a specific article that would explain how you cut metal without leaving a sharp edge. I did check a bunch of articles, but I didn't find an explanation for how you cut thin metal without leaving a sharp edge.

And yes, the top cutting can openers do leave a sharp edge on the inside,, near the top edge of the can. I learned to be careful of that and keep my fingers out of the can a long time ago. The other top seems like an invitation to accidentally brush your hand on the sharp edge.
There is a youtube video that explains and shows how it works. I thought that might be helpful.
 

Andy M.

Certified Pretend Chef
Joined
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Messages
49,793
Location
Massachusetts
The one about the Oxo side cutting can opener? I watched that. It didn't explain how that top edge of the can isn't sharp. It just claimed that it was safe.

This one.

I found it convincing but if it doesn't do it for you, I don't know what to say. Stick with the Swingaway.
 

taxlady

Chef Extraordinaire
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near Montreal, Quebec
This one.

I found it convincing but if it doesn't do it for you, I don't know what to say. Stick with the Swingaway.
Yeah, I know how it is supposed to work. And yeah, it doesn't make the jagged parts. Still no explanation of how a thin piece of metal can be cut without being sharp. There aren't any jagged bits on my chef's knife. The blade is smooth, but I have still cut myself on it on more than one occasion.
 
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