hi

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kitchenelf

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Feb 21, 2002
Messages
19,722
Location
North Carolina
Hi nav,

I really don't know how to answer your question as I'm not sure what exactly you are asking. I can assure you it's only because of my lack of knowledge on the topic!! I thought I could help but even doing a search on the topic I don't think I'm finding what you are asking for.

Can you give some more examples? Maybe that will help.
 

kitchenelf

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Feb 21, 2002
Messages
19,722
Location
North Carolina
Whew - LOL nav, I'm glad you explained that in more detail - Mmmmmm as far as cooking with gloves people do that now but more for sanitary reasons and I use mine for holding a hot, baked, whole chicken, or putting my gloved hands in boiling water to make mozzarella.

As far as a "new" gadget in the kitchen someone has marketed a "machine" that attaches to your pot and constantly stirs it - that's pretty neat. I guess I'll have to think of this as I'm cooking tonight - I'll report back!!
 

leigh

Senior Cook
Joined
Jun 16, 2002
Messages
148
Location
Eastern Kansas
kitchenelf said:
. . . putting my gloved hands in boiling water to make mozzarella.

Oh, MY, elf!! Could you PUH-LEASE post that mozzarella recipe? I had given up on finding any cheese recipes other than cottage! :eek:

thankyouthankyouthankyouthankyou :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
 

kitchenelf

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Feb 21, 2002
Messages
19,722
Location
North Carolina
All you do to make mozzarella is buy cheese curds - place in a very large bowl that can handle the boiling water. When your water comes to a rolling boil pour over the cheese, take your GLOVED hands and start squishing the cheese together - when it has come together and is thoroughly mixed you then dip it in ice water to cool it off.

At this point you can either roll in little balls and place in olive oil (you could even flavor the oil with fresh basil leaves and some pink berries, or you can roll out with a rolling pin and slather with a layer of pesto, then a layer of sun-dried tomatoes, then a layer of proscuitto, roll jelly-roll fashion, then roll in wax paper folding ends down. Put in refrigerator and when ready slice into pinwheels.
 

lindatooo

Head Chef
Joined
Apr 13, 2004
Messages
1,172
Location
Portland, Or
Elf you keep this up and I'm gonna need a shield for my keyboard! That sounds soooo.....ummmm....good :D :D Gonna try it!
 

jasonr

Senior Cook
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
375
My theory is that NAV has been captured by terrorists and is being held in a secret compound in Pakistan where he is allowed to surf the internet, but his outgoing traffic is monitored carefully. He cannot come out and ask for help, so he is posting various messages on this cooking forum that make no sense, in the hope that someone will catch on and alert the American embassy in Pakistan to send in the troops to rescue him.
 

-DEADLY SUSHI-

Washing Up
Joined
Mar 9, 2004
Messages
6,070
Location
NW Chicago Burbs'
Yes Jasonr! I feel that youre on to something! OR NAV lives in Australia...... and after he had his quiche pan stolen, he went to get it back, and now the Wallaroo are holding him hostage! :shock: (Please refer to the topic: Where to buy Cast Iron in Australia)
Poor NAV is probably forced to make quiche night and day. His only hope is when he goes to look up another quiche recipe on the internet to appease the Wallaroo. :(
I will have a candle light vigil for him tonight. :(
The Wallaroo are a part of the Axis of Evil... and MUST be stopped!! :x
 

Barbara L

Traveling Welcome Wagon
Joined
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Messages
15,716
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Somewhere, US
Last I heard, someone had stuffed a Black Mane African Lion with him and he was roasting on a spit in Columbus.

;) Barbara
 

Alix

Everymom
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
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Messages
23,275
Location
Edmonton, Alberta
OK...you lot are just nuts! I laughed so hard reading this I had to go find the kleenex! Hey Elf...I am interested in your post about the mozzarella cheese. Where do you find cheese curds? I can't find any anywhere. Also, does anyone know why mozzarella is also called "buffalo cheese"? Please tell me it is because some enterprising soul was brave enough to milk a buffalo!
 

Barbara L

Traveling Welcome Wagon
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Messages
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Somewhere, US
Alix,

I've never seen cheese curd in a regular store. Are there any places near you that make cheese? You should be able to get cheese curd there. Or maybe online. When you bite into a fresh cheese curd, it squeeks in your teeth!

I found this at BBCi:

"Authentic mozzarella is made from buffalo-milk, primarily in the Italian provinces of Caserta and Salerno, and also in the neighbouring communes in the provinces of Benevento, Naples, Latina, Frosinone and Rome, which together constitute the single geographical area in which mozzarella is produced.

Notably, the history of the Mediterranean buffalo is unknown although it is thought to have originated in Eastern India. They may have been introduced by any of the series of invaders from the Greeks to the Normans, or the breed may be aboriginal having been there since the quaternary period. However, it is fairly certain that the Romans made some use of the buffalo as a draught animal in ploughing watery terrains, both because of its strength and the size of its hooves, which don't sink into the moist soils. Certainly, the buffalo found sanctuary in the swampy Campania, the countryside beyond Naples, and perhaps that is why the tradition of buffalo-rearing (so to speak!) in this region has sustained.

Certainly, anyway, the manufacture of authentic mozzarella is centuries old, and now it is protected by European Commission Law, through Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) legislation. This means that the European Commission has decided that only mozzarella cheese made in the specified manner and in the specified regions of Italy can now be sold as authentic mozzarella di bufala.

However, 'industrial' cow's milk mozzarella may still be manufactured and sold by all and sundry. This comparatively bland (sometimes yellow) plastic imitation lacks the brilliant blue-white porcelain finish of genuine mozzarella. On account of the need for shelf-life, it is always compromised in terms of moisture content and (by definition) freshness, and, anyway, will never(!), due to the difference between cow-milk and buffalo-milk be able to compete on equal terms in terms of body and texture. Nevertheless, cow-milk mozzarella should not be considered as an inferior product - just a different one.

Manufacture

Buffalo milk, obtained from a single early-morning milking, is heated to of 35°C (95°F). Rennet2 is then added and the concoction is allowed to 'rest' for around an hour, after which the whey is drained off. The curd is then broken up into small pieces, immersed in boiling water (according to legend, mozzarella first came into being after some cheese curds fell into a bucket of hot water), and spun until long ropes of cheese form, which the blessed cheesemaker kneads until he obtains a smooth shiny paste. Herein lies the skill ... waiting too long will result in the elaboration of a mushy cheese, while a tough dry cheese will result from stringing too early. After kneading the lump is broken up. Indeed, the name mozzarella is a diminutive derivation from the Italian noun mozza (a cut), from mozzare, (to cut off) and moulded into balls (ovoline or bocconcini), rolls, loaves, or plaits (trecce), which are stored in cold brine so that they maintain their shapes while they cool.

And thus, the cheese is now ready, just eight hours after extracting the milk from the buffalo's udder.

Enjoying Mozzarella

Genuine fresh mozzarella, prepared by evening is ready for consumption the next morning, oozing with freshness and flavour, and ideally set upon a hunk of fresh bread. At room temperature, it should yield pearls of milky whey (like a lactating nipple) upon slicing and should squeak when in contact with tooth enamel (more of the same!) after which it should melt in the mouth. Mozzarella's life span is only 3-4 days, if that."

:) Barbara
 

MJ

Executive Chef
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
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4,567
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USA,Wisconsin
Barbara, very interesting! Thanks.
Fresh curds are to die for!! I love how they "squeek" in your mouth! Thats funny.
 

Alix

Everymom
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
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Messages
23,275
Location
Edmonton, Alberta
Thanks Barbara, that was awesome! I love real mozzarella, and there is an Italian grocery downtown that I go to when I need a fix. I don't have a dairy anywhere close by as we are in a very urban setting here. I will ask a friend of mine who runs a cattle ranch if there is anything near him as I would love to try this for myself. OH, and before I forget...congratulations on finishing your report cards!
 

Barbara L

Traveling Welcome Wagon
Joined
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Messages
15,716
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Somewhere, US
Alix said:
OH, and before I forget...congratulations on finishing your report cards!
LOL Thanks Alix! I was actually early for once!

:) Barbara
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