How to cook sausage without a gas grill?

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I love sausage, but no longer have a grill. I tried cooking them in the microwave, in the oven, and boiling them, but the skins are too tough to chew. I can fry them in a frying pan on the stove, but that splatters all over.

Is there a way to cook sausage so that the skins are saoftened like they are on the grill but without the splatter?

These are mostly fully cooked sausages like bratwurst.

Thanks
 

dcSaute

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I have a large and a small spatter shield for the fry pans

multiple styles avail:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=spatter+...x=spatter+s,aps,132&ref=nb_sb_ss_ts-doa-p_2_9

Great, thanks. So the only way to make the skins edible is some sort of frying, right?

the other trick is to use (wood/bamboo) skewers inserted to keep them 'straight' - which makes pan frying much easier. you'll need pliers/snippers to cut the skewers to length...)
looks like
View attachment 52129

Now that makes a lot of sense. And it makes the splatter screen more usable. I was cutting them into 2-3 pieces so they were less curved and I could turn them more easily. But I had to hold them in place so they wouldn't roll over.

Why are sausages curved, anyway? Can't they make them straight?

Would those skewers be reusable?

What the lowest temperature I can use?

ps: bratwurst are typically not 'fully cooked'

Right. I thought I had bratwurst, but I just checked, it's bangers. When I took them out of the freezer, I didn't look closely. They just looked like bratwurst.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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Place your daisages onto bamboo skerwers, as stated by the others. Put them into a lightly oild, cold , heavy pan with.a couple tbs. water. Cover, and place on the stove over medium heat. Cook for 4 minutes. Uncover, and flip them. Cover and cook 4 more minutes. Remove the cover, and place inder your broiler. Broil amother three minutes per side to brown the skins. Take care to avoid piecing the skins to retain the juces inside your sausages. Remove and place on paper towels to drain. Serve piping hot.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

FrankZ

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There's a lot of things you can use a sous vide cooker for that are good, sausage is made for sous vide. Once they are done you can sear them with a torch.
 
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Place your daisages onto bamboo skerwers, as stated by the others. Put them into a lightly oild, cold , heavy pan with.a couple tbs. water. Cover, and place on the stove over medium heat. Cook for 4 minutes. Uncover, and flip them. Cover and cook 4 more minutes. Remove the cover, and place inder your broiler. Broil amother three minutes per side to brown the skins. Take care to avoid piecing the skins to retain the juces inside your sausages. Remove and place on paper towels to drain. Serve piping hot.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

Won't the skins be pretty well browned from the frying pan? Maybe I had the pan too hot, but mine came out almost black. I had it on about 3-4.

What kind of oil? I was using olive oil which seemed to work pretty well.
 
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There's a lot of things you can use a sous vide cooker for that are good, sausage is made for sous vide. Once they are done you can sear them with a torch.

Really? We love our sous vide. What temperature do you set it to?

I've never used a torch and don't have one. I suppose that's not the same thing as the little "torch" we use to light birthday candles.

Probably just a quick blast?
 

FrankZ

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Really? We love our sous vide. What temperature do you set it to?

I've never used a torch and don't have one. I suppose that's not the same thing as the little "torch" we use to light birthday candles.

Probably just a quick blast?

140-160.

I use a butane kitchen torch, or you could sear in hot cast iron.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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Won't the skins be pretty well browned from the frying pan? Maybe I had the pan too hot, but mine came out almost black. I had it on about 3-4.

What kind of oil? I was using olive oil which seemed to work pretty well.

In the technique I posted, the water in the pan with the cover on turns to steam. There isn't enough water to make the skins too soft, just enough to steam the sausages until cooked through. Once the cover is removed, the water evaporates, and allows the sausages to brow through the mallard reaction. If you want to use a broiler, or grill to brown your sausages, that's a great flavor as well.

As for oil, olive oil will work. However, extra virgin olive oil isn't suitable for frying due to its low smoke point. A more refined olive oil is needed. Other cooking oils that will work include sunflower, safflower, peanut, avocado, and corn oil. Common vegetable oil is usually made from soybean, which can be an issue for those with soybean sensitivity. I don't use Canola oil, as I'm not convinced that it's all that healthy. But that's a personal choice.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

taxlady

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I'm tired of hearing about EVOO's supposedly low smoke point. Sure, there are some oils that have higher smoke points. But, for regular cooking, even for most deep frying, it's high enough. It's 190°C - 374°F.
 

dragnlaw

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I'm not understanding why people would pay the extra for OO, whether cold-pressed, EV or anything in between for any kind of frying.
 

Just Cooking

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I'm not understanding why people would pay the extra for OO, whether cold-pressed, EV or anything in between for any kind of frying.

For me,its mainly habit.

I seldom fry anything now but, I like EVOO for sauteing veggies, shrimp, dressings, etc.

For everything else, I use plain veggie oil.

Ross
 

taxlady

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I'm not understanding why people would pay the extra for OO, whether cold-pressed, EV or anything in between for any kind of frying.

If one wants a cooking / food oil that isn't chemically extracted, but pressed, then EVOO is the most readily available. EVOO (and I imagine virgin OO) are usually the cheapest of those mechanically extracted oils. At least that's my experience.
 

CraigC

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Use a charcoal grill if you don't have a gas grill. Sorry, couldn't resist.

Since nobody else answered, bamboo skewers are not reusable. Buy some metal ones if you want to reuse. They do come in different sizes.

When you stuff sausage, it naturally curves as you fill it when you are doing long runs. We filled and then twisted to make links. I'll bet the commercial companies do the same, except using machines.

Sure, you can make straight sausage, VERY short and skinny links, twisting as you go, but you'd have to do that yourself as I sincerely doubt commercial companies are going to make anything like that, except maybe some of the breakfast sausage companies.
 

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