I NEED a smoker

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Jeekinz

Washing Up
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Oct 23, 2006
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Ok...at 225*-250* cooker temperature.. figure on 1.5 hours (+or-) per pound for a full size (8-10lb) butt! For partial sizes (2-3-4 lbs) I don't have a clue.



To the meat..None... To you...a lot. How well you maintain a constant temperature (Fire Control) is the key. The weather affects your ability to maintain that constant temperature. You will find it more of a challenge when it's 35*, North wind at 15 MPH, and misting rain than when it's 80* Calm winds, and sunshine...HTH

PS...When it's windy move your cooker out of the wind.

I'd say under perfect conditions 4-6 hours on a chimney full of briquettes is stretching it a little. I went through a large bag and a half for 10-12 hours keeping the cooking temp at 225.

Like UB said, there are plenty of factors...even the design or materials of your smoker/cooker has an affect.
 

jminion

Senior Cook
Joined
Dec 19, 2005
Messages
114
Location
Federal Way, WA
Thanks, that's exactly what I thought. I knew there must be a time frame or how could you ever have these competitions if no one knew when the food was going to be ready. I just need to get some consistent fuel and get a handle on my fire control.
I picked a fine time to learn how to Q.... what with the weather changing on a daily basis (lol).

Pacanis
You learn how to handle each different situation as it arises.
Weather is a big factor, just a front moving into the area can slow a cook down. You learn to use tools available to you like adding heat to the pit and foil. Protecting the pit from the elements with wind breaks, getting the pit out of the rain, use of packing blankets are just some of the things you can do.

When you are cooking on a grill the meats you are working with do not have the connective tissue that we normally cook in the smoker. Connective tissue needs time at low pit temps or time in foil to speed up the process.

A smaller butt or brisket still requires time to break down the connective tissue and because you have scalled down the total mass the chance of great results are reduced unless you use techniques that are not traditional to BBQ.
 

pacanis

Chef Extraordinaire
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Feb 11, 2007
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18,750
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NW PA
A smaller butt or brisket still requires time to break down the connective tissue and because you have scalled down the total mass the chance of great results are reduced unless you use techniques that are not traditional to BBQ.

That's certainly different thinking than what I would figure, but that's why I am askiing questions.
My thinking is that the smaller piece would reach the temp needed to break down the connective tissues more quickly. I would call that reaching a state of doneness. Like saying it takes a certain time/lb to cook a roast in the oven. A smaller roast takes less time, but the same cooking process, or stages, happened. As long as the temp requirements are met.

But it's not like I'm going to discard my Ducane or anything(lol)
I appreciate the additional insight.
 

jminion

Senior Cook
Joined
Dec 19, 2005
Messages
114
Location
Federal Way, WA
Pacanis

Baking is a science, BBQ is an art. When we grill connective tissue are not needed in our factoring. When BBQ'n because of the lower temps and cuts we cook time is less predictable, but there are ways to manipulate things.
By changing the amount of heat, adding liquids and enclosing the meat you can rush things along.

Your better off allowing the meat to take it's time and learning what that is about before you start manipulating things, it's just all part of the learning process.
 

pacanis

Chef Extraordinaire
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Feb 11, 2007
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LOL, the more I hear about Q, or smoking, the more I like indirect cooking low and slow on my grill with a couple foil pouches of chips on the burners :ermm:.....:LOL:

I'm definitely going into this next burn more prepared.

Thanks for helping, Jim.
 
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