IF you HAD to prep

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blissful

Executive Chef
Joined
Mar 25, 2008
Messages
4,922
Thank you for all the replies! I was nervous about posting this new thread. Everyone's stories and suggestions are so interesting. Being from WV and knowing our skills, I think we would make loads of moonshine. We certainly know how and it could be a good trade and used for lots of stuff! :LOL:

Sally was driving home from one of her business trips in Northern Arizona when she saw an elderly Navajo woman walking on the side of the road. As the trip was a long and quiet one, she stopped the car and asked the Navajo woman if she would like a ride. With a word or two of thanks, she got in the car.
After resuming the journey and a bit of small talk, the Navajo woman noticed a brown bag on the seat next to Sally. "What's in the bag?" asked the old woman. Sally looked down at the brown bag and said, "It's a bottle of wine. Got it for my husband."
The Navajo woman was silent for a moment, and then speaking with the quiet wisdom of an elder said, "Good trade."
 

Kaneohegirlinaz

Wannabe TV Chef
Joined
Aug 2, 2014
Messages
7,777
Location
Central/Northern AZ, gateway to The Grand Canyon
sally was driving home from one of her business trips in northern arizona when she saw an elderly navajo woman walking on the side of the road. As the trip was a long and quiet one, she stopped the car and asked the navajo woman if she would like a ride. With a word or two of thanks, she got in the car.
After resuming the journey and a bit of small talk, the navajo woman noticed a brown bag on the seat next to sally. "what's in the bag?" asked the old woman. Sally looked down at the brown bag and said, "it's a bottle of wine. Got it for my husband."
the navajo woman was silent for a moment, and then speaking with the quiet wisdom of an elder said, "good trade."



giggles1.jpg
 

Merlot

Sous Chef
Joined
Dec 28, 2011
Messages
952
Location
WV
Sally was driving home from one of her business trips in Northern Arizona when she saw an elderly Navajo woman walking on the side of the road. As the trip was a long and quiet one, she stopped the car and asked the Navajo woman if she would like a ride. With a word or two of thanks, she got in the car.
After resuming the journey and a bit of small talk, the Navajo woman noticed a brown bag on the seat next to Sally. "What's in the bag?" asked the old woman. Sally looked down at the brown bag and said, "It's a bottle of wine. Got it for my husband."
The Navajo woman was silent for a moment, and then speaking with the quiet wisdom of an elder said, "Good trade."

:LOL:
 

dragnlaw

Site Team
Staff member
Joined
Feb 16, 2013
Messages
7,559
Location
Waterdown, Ontario
I agree 100% - GOOD TRADE!

But back to prepping - there are so many different type of emergencies... my son has grab & run bags. Different coloured bags - red has the most urgent necessities. Blue the extras, still necessities but could do without if you really really have to.
Red, certain meds, container for to get water, water purifier tablets, fire starters, fire lighters, dried food packets, etc. things like that. Blue has warming blankets (super thin but extra warm), extra medical supplies, soaps, tooth brushes (don't forget hygiene in emergency situations can help lessen the impact of trauma).

I don't remember exactly what all he has in them but it is rather well organized. If they get an instant evacuate signal all he has to do is grab the bags, the kids and head for the hills!
 

sparrowgrass

Head Chef
Joined
Jun 29, 2004
Messages
1,819
Location
Highest point in Missouri
Disaster Preparedness Plan | Make a Plan | Red Cross

Red Cross has some great info on how to get your family ready for any kind of disaster. Prepper folks seem to concentrate on the apocalypse/nuclear war, but there are lots of smaller disasters all the time. Chemical spills on the highways/railroads, hurricanes, house fires, floods.

One thing you are guaranteed to hear from disaster survivors is a complaint about the government not being there quick enough to help THEM. Take responsibility--the government is going to be there, but it might take them a day or two or three, depending on the extent of the problem. Have your own plans regarding what you will do if the water or power is shut off, or if you have to leave your home for an extended period. Don't sit back and wait for someone to rescue you.
 

PrincessFiona60

Ogress Supreme
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Jul 14, 2009
Messages
38,955
Location
Wyoming
Disaster Preparedness Plan | Make a Plan | Red Cross

Red Cross has some great info on how to get your family ready for any kind of disaster. Prepper folks seem to concentrate on the apocalypse/nuclear war, but there are lots of smaller disasters all the time. Chemical spills on the highways/railroads, hurricanes, house fires, floods.

One thing you are guaranteed to hear from disaster survivors is a complaint about the government not being there quick enough to help THEM. Take responsibility--the government is going to be there, but it might take them a day or two or three, depending on the extent of the problem. Have your own plans regarding what you will do if the water or power is shut off, or if you have to leave your home for an extended period. Don't sit back and wait for someone to rescue you.

You will be glad you are prepared when the Zombie Apocalypse comes.:ROFLMAO:
 

Kaneohegirlinaz

Wannabe TV Chef
Joined
Aug 2, 2014
Messages
7,777
Location
Central/Northern AZ, gateway to The Grand Canyon
Ya know, up here in Cowboy-ville, trade and barter for goods and services is very common, where I haven't seen that since was a little, little kid.
I think that folks don't think about that any more and in the case of a disaster that would be useful to have something, be it a service or a good to trade.
Home canned goods, potable water, the possibilities are endless.
 

taxlady

Chef Extraordinaire
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Sep 13, 2010
Messages
28,834
Location
near Montreal, Quebec
I'm surprised by the people who have wells that run on electric and no way to get water if there is no water. We pried the concrete cover off the well and dipped out water (it was a spring well, so not all that deep). A friend still had the old fashioned pump in the kitchen attached to her well and could actually pump water right into her sink.
 

blissful

Executive Chef
Joined
Mar 25, 2008
Messages
4,922
Ya know, up here in Cowboy-ville, trade and barter for goods and services is very common, where I haven't seen that since was a little, little kid.
I think that folks don't think about that any more and in the case of a disaster that would be useful to have something, be it a service or a good to trade.
Home canned goods, potable water, the possibilities are endless.

I'm in Wisconsin, if I know someone that has something they usually sell, I will barter with them. Make an offer and see what they say. It's not just during an emergency, that it still makes sense.

The trick is to have on hand things above and beyond what you will use yourself and make it available to others. I've bartered soap, garlic, traps, food, food preparation, teaching, plants, and received all kinds of goodies, mulch-straw, produce, water, candy, herbal medicines, plants, and handmade items for the household. I hope to add cheese to my list of things I have available that others might want to trade.

Building those relationships takes time and trust and fairness. If you wait until an emergency, you are more likely to find more desperate people and less likely to make fair trades.
 

Merlot

Sous Chef
Joined
Dec 28, 2011
Messages
952
Location
WV
During the derecho in 2012? We had a generator but the whole county shut down, no gas!
My fiancé does a lot of trading. He is great at it. Just in general, he makes me feel safer than I have in a long time in case we did have a need for an emergency. My ex husband was pure useless :huh:
 

buckytom

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Aug 19, 2004
Messages
21,933
Location
My mountain
I'm not a prepper, but as an old habit I have a few backpacks in the garage ready to go as bug-out bags. It's not so much on purpose for survival, rather it's just easier to store everything ready to go.

Although, I hopefully wouldn't need to go anywhere. I live on the edge of thousands of acres of a nature preserve, dotted with clean, natural lakes for water, fish, and edible plants. And I have enough meat walking through my backyard every day in terms of deer, bear, and turkey that protein wouldn't be a problem.

The woods behind me is loaded with wild raspberries and blackberries, hence the wildlife.

As far as veggies go, growing lettuces and other greens is pretty easy to do, even in winter if you have a really sunny room.

Finally, I have enough wood to heat the house through 2 winters. I took down about 35 trees last year in order to have a backyard instead of a forest, so I now have about 8 to 10 cords or more of wood waiting to be cut and split.
 
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