If you were going to buy new cookware....

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wally

Assistant Cook
Joined
Apr 9, 2005
Messages
1
You should look at Demeyere cookware. It is made in Belgium and is superb. In their premium line, Atlantis, each pan or pot is designed for specific use, unlike All Clad & other "clad" cookware. In those brands the maker uses the same material & method of manufacturing to make all pieces, regardless of function.

I have been using for two years & it is the best I have used. I have over 100 pieces of cookware in my collection; all brands.

Good luck.
 

choclatechef

Washing Up
Joined
Sep 1, 2004
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1,680
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USA
Le Creuset cookware. Cast Iron cookware. A heavy stainless steel lined copper cookware.
 

Stevie

Cook
Joined
Sep 16, 2004
Messages
98
Location
USA,Texas
America's Test Kitchen magazine did a test comparison of traditional (stainless steel) frying pans and All-Clad was their favorite. Demeyere cookware was not in the comparison, I'm sure it's great cookware a little pricey for me though. In the same magazine they said the All-Clad non-stick frying pan was their favorite too. I just bought one but haven't used it yet my old Calphalon still has some life left in it. I second the Le Creuset too.
 

luvs

Master Chef
Joined
Aug 24, 2004
Messages
9,671
Location
da 'burgh
well, all clad of course! i already use that now and even my scrambled eggs won't stick if i add a little butter. my Dad helped innovate cop-r-chef. 'nuff said. shhhh.... he's been asking me to bring that up for while.... family politics.
 

luvs

Master Chef
Joined
Aug 24, 2004
Messages
9,671
Location
da 'burgh
luvs_food said:
well, all clad of course! i already use that now and even my scrambled eggs won't stick if i add a little butter. my Dad helped innovate cop-r-chef. 'nuff said. shhhh.... he's been asking me to bring that up for while.... family politics.

BTW, my family banned teflon yrs. ago! don't need it if you have cladware!
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

Certified/Certifiable
Joined
Aug 26, 2004
Messages
12,436
Location
USA,Michigan
I second ChocolateChef's advice. I go for inexpensive, hard-working, indestructable stuff that performs well. I don't need the name, and can't afford the price.

My cast-iron is well seasoned and will do almost anything I need done. And what it won't do, my selction of aluminum and copper disk pots and pans do just fine. The only thing I use specialty pans for is baking cakes, pies, etc., where you need a particular shape.

And to tell you the truth, I've never made better pizza crust than when I used my largest cast-iron pan to bake it in.

I won't use teflon coated stuff. I'm way to hard on pots and pans, plus, they degrade and become dangerous at higher temperatures.

Seeeeeya: Goodweed of the North
 

Otter

Sous Chef
Joined
Sep 1, 2004
Messages
973
Location
USA,Minnesota
Calphalon or Ultrex non-stick: 2 sauce pans for sticky sauces, skillet for eggs & omelets, pancake griddle
All-Clad ss and Lodge ci: searing meats, creating fond, finishing in oven
Le Creuset: French oven for soups, stews, casseroles, roasts
 

eric

Cook
Joined
Apr 4, 2005
Messages
74
Location
Southern California
wildcat97 said:
What material would you prefer and/or what brand?

It really depends on what you are making. Its like someone asking what kind of car to get but some people drive off road, some people drive on sand, some people drive in mud, some people drive only on highways, some people need to drive 5 people, some people drive solo.

For saute and getting good carmelization -- cast iron or black iron pans
For pots (not pans), stainless steel with good heavy bottom and if possible, with copper bottom plated on it (not painted on like some cheapo ones)
For slow cooking, enamel (Creuset type)
Don't worry so much on the brand (marketers will make you pay for that name anyway) but go for strength.

BTW, restaurant equipment is NFS rated, it HAS to have a NFS logo on it. The better stainless steel, NFS rated pans, are very expensive (ie, Sitram pans from France).

I mostly use black iron from France for general cooking. These are *like* cast iron but thinner. They also have very long handles. I've seen old photos of similar pans and there is no difference in design.

I use non-stick for eggs just for ease but you can pretty much use any pan and make it non-stick.

Non-stick pans and good carmelization is possible, but completely opposite of what you would want good carmelization for.
 

wildcat97

Assistant Cook
Joined
Nov 26, 2004
Messages
10
Location
USA
Thank you all!
Eric- sorry it was a vague question :) Your answer is really helpful though- I am thinking of replacing my dinky, mostly teflon stuff all at once.
 

eric

Cook
Joined
Apr 4, 2005
Messages
74
Location
Southern California
wildcat97 said:
Thank you all!
Eric- sorry it was a vague question :)

If I was to get just ONE, I'll use iron or cast iron.

You should check out (if they have at your library or peruse it at the bookstore) "On Food and Cooking". In the back of the book somewhere, McGee (I just found out this was a pen name), writes what material is good for which method of cooking.
 

jennyema

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Mar 1, 2002
Messages
10,420
Location
Boston and Cape Cod
eric said:
If I was to get just ONE, I'll use iron or cast iron.

You should check out (if they have at your library or peruse it at the bookstore) "On Food and Cooking". In the back of the book somewhere, McGee (I just found out this was a pen name), writes what material is good for which method of cooking.


If I were only going to buy one, it would NOT be iron or cast iron unless it was coated, Like LC. Uncoated is reactive with food.

It would be fully clad stainless steel, like All Clad or similar. NO nonstick.

Check out online sellers of All Clad "cosmetic seconds." I got a whopping assortment for less than half price.

Don't buy sets -- they usually include pieces you'll never use. Dont think about Emerilware.

Here's an interesting discussion. http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:66UOxMcLP14J:forums.egullet.com/lofiversion/index.php/t14615.html+discount+%22all+clad%22+%22cosmetic+seconds%22&hl=en
 

Stevie

Cook
Joined
Sep 16, 2004
Messages
98
Location
USA,Texas
Wow, I know these are hard times for some but like jennyemma said these cosmetic seconds or irregulars are going for near half price. The first link I posted has a 20% off an already reduced price yet some just cant see spending that kind of money. Well sometimes you get what you pay for. It's amazing to me why so many have such an attitude about non stick. I always keep one around mainly for eggs but they do come in handy. While watching Jaques Pepin a few weeks ago I don't remember the dish he was cooking (it wasn't eggs) he made the comment that you'd have alot of trouble making the dish without a non-stick and he was using the pan I just bought, so there. :-p
 

choclatechef

Washing Up
Joined
Sep 1, 2004
Messages
1,680
Location
USA
I am a firm believer that I would rather have second hand diamonds than none at all.

In other words, if I can find a great piece of cooking equipment used for 1/4 of the new price or less, in good condition, I go for it.

Lack of money has never been an issue for me getting great cookware. Garage sales, thrift shops, auctions, used restaurant supply stores, Ebay, and even ---dare we say it, metal salvage yards often have great deals.

Some TLC with lots of soap, water, bleach, metal scrubbing brush, etc. and you are in business.
 

RPCookin

Executive Chef
Joined
Apr 20, 2005
Messages
2,857
Location
Logan County, Colorado
I can't say that I have much experience with various types and brands, but I like what I have, even though it appears to be frowned on by most posters here. I have a :ohmy: 10 piece set of Emerilware by All Clad (nonstick), plus one 10" stainless All Clad saute pan. This is my primary cookware, and I haven't found anything to complain about with it. I am careful with the nonstick pans (wooden or plastic utensils only), and after 4 years I have had no problems with the coating peeling off (in fact it still looks like new). I bought the set right after we had the kitchen remodeled, and none of our old, cheap cookware would work on the new flattop range, so replacing it was a necessity, not an option.

And as far as going with the nonstick, I HATE cleaning up, so anything that mitigates the mess is a good thing. :rolleyes:
 

Claire

Master Chef
Joined
Sep 4, 2004
Messages
7,967
Location
Galena, IL
I had to buy new kitchenware from scratch, and have been very happy with my Sitram. I supplement it with a couple of inexpensive nonstick skillets that I just toss away every few years. My biggest recommendation is to never buy aluminum, there are too many limitations, and to avoid the lovely copper unless you truly get satisfaction and love out of cleaning and seeing something lovely after you're through (I'm not one, and lived with copper for the first 40 years of my life, and enough is enough).
 

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