I'm Ready For the Pain

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Chief Longwind Of The North

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I did it! I ordered Guajillo, and ancho chili pods to make pozole. While on the Pendery's site, I just couldn't stop my self from ordering these ground chilis, in order of heat from coolest to hottest:
1. Buk Jalokia (Ghost Pepper)
2. 7 Pod du
3. Trinidad Scorpion Maruga
4. Carolina Reaper

I see some very hot pepper sauce, and salsa coming my way. I used to eat the salsa by the spoonful, when i started getting sleepy at work. It burned just a little to me. But it sure did wake me up.

Caution, swelled head moment here. I was told by several co-workers that is was the best super hot salsa they ever ate. Of course the flavor was rounded out with sweet, ripe, bell peppers, ban nana, and serrano peppers as well. Japones, tomato chunks, onion, and celery, all simmered for 30 minutes, then pressure canned at 18 lbs. for 30 minutes more. Yep, the fire is coming to Montana. I'll have to keep some Tabasco sauce on hand too cool my mouth down:LOL:.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 
Last edited:

kb0000

Washing Up
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Dec 29, 2020
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heber city
“[FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Heat” (hot pepper) [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]should never be included in a recipe because its not food. [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]At best, its[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif] a condiment. [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif][/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]H[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]eat” is not detected by the tongue’s taste buds or by the flavor sensing nerves in the nose. “Heat” [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]is not a food. “[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Heat” is closer to poison than food because [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif][/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]heat[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif][/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]is detected by an entirely different set of nerves [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]than those that taste food.[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif][/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Heat” is detected by [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]the largest ne[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]r[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]v[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]e[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif] system in the body, the nerve system that detects pain. I[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]f[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif] you put salt on your tongue, you know right away that its salt. If you apply heat, it takes 3 minutes before you notice it. That’s because, for some Darwinian reason, pain detection takes 3 minutes to register. [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Want to experience “heat”? Stab yourself in the leg. Its the same thing. [/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Sensitivity[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif] [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]to [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]“heat” varies by a factor of 1,000, [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]so no recipe can declare a proper amount of hot pepper. Whatever the specified amount is, it will be wrong for 99.9% of people. [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif] [/FONT]
 

taxlady

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near Montreal, Quebec
“[FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Heat” (hot pepper) [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]should never be included in a recipe because its not food. [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]At best, its[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif] a condiment. [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif][/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]H[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]eat” is not detected by the tongue’s taste buds or by the flavor sensing nerves in the nose. “Heat” [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]is not a food. “[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Heat” is closer to poison than food because [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif][/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]heat[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif][/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]is detected by an entirely different set of nerves [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]than those that taste food.[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif][/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Heat” is detected by [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]the largest ne[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]r[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]v[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]e[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif] system in the body, the nerve system that detects pain. I[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]f[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif] you put salt on your tongue, you know right away that its salt. If you apply heat, it takes 3 minutes before you notice it. That’s because, for some Darwinian reason, pain detection takes 3 minutes to register. [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Want to experience “heat”? Stab yourself in the leg. Its the same thing. [/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Sensitivity[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif] [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]to [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]“heat” varies by a factor of 1,000, [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]so no recipe can declare a proper amount of hot pepper. Whatever the specified amount is, it will be wrong for 99.9% of people. [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif] [/FONT]

Where did you get these ideas? How did you conclude that it takes three minutes to detect pain? Have you never gotten a splinter or gotten stuck by a needle, or been burnt by a spark?
 

GotGarlic

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
May 9, 2007
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Southeastern Virginia
Where did you get these ideas? How did you conclude that it takes three minutes to detect pain? Have you never gotten a splinter or gotten stuck by a needle, or been burnt by a spark?
Or grabbed a hot pan by mistake? Pain is felt instantly as a protective mechanism. Pain also causes the body to release endorphins, the pleasure hormone, which is how people who eat them regularly come to crave spicy foods.
 

Whiskadoodle

Executive Chef
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Nov 1, 2011
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4,129
Location
Twin Cities Mn
I admire thar you start out with ghost peppers as the coolest of the 4 you select to try. Habeneros is the hottest that I knowingly have ever had

Hope you have asbestos oven mitts to handle the spice jars and hazmat armor to wear when using. :ohmy:

1. Buk Jalokia (Ghost Pepper)
2. 7 Pod du
3. Trinidad Scorpion Maruga
4. Carolina Reaper
 

pepperhead212

Executive Chef
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
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Location
Woodbury, NJ
I am actually growing a Carolina Reaper seedling for a friend this year - The Chocolate Habanero is the hottest one I will grow for myself this year, around 400k Skoville units. But for those who don't like heat, there's a very mild habanero I will have, called Aji Dulce, and is the same species, with only 500 or less SUs.

I only have 14 varieties this year, which is the least for me in a long time! I have more tomatoes than peppers this year, which is unusual!
 

kb0000

Washing Up
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Dec 29, 2020
Messages
130
Location
heber city
Where did you get these ideas? How did you conclude that it takes three minutes to detect pain? Have you never gotten a splinter or gotten stuck by a needle, or been burnt by a spark?
[FONT=Times New Roman, serif]F[/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]rom where? Medical research[/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman, serif]3 minutes to detect pain. Now that [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]you led me to [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif] think about it, I suspect I mis-remebered, and that pain detection has 3 second delay while taste and flavor are instantaneous. [/FONT]
[FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Burns: [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]I didn’t mention it, but you brought it up. The pain receptor system detects both pain and temperature, with the same delay. That’s why it takes a moment for the ‘heat’ to hit when you eat a hot pepper. [/FONT]
 

karadekoolaid

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Jul 16, 2006
Messages
1,317
Location
Caracas
I grew Naga Jolokia in the garden last year. They are seriously, seriously hot, and rather than use them ALL in one sauce, I tend to add a few to a batch of milder peppers. In fact, just a pinch of Naga in a red pepper jelly made with bell peppers, and you kick the flavour up a notch.
I sliced a thin sliver from the middle of the pepper to taste. The burning sensation lasted 20 minutes. Despite the fact that chile peppers are actually good for you (more Vitamin C than an orange), I think I´ll stick to oranges in the future.
I´ve got a friend who grows Carolina Reaper, Trinidad Scorpion and one called Dragon´s Breath. Great for making pepper spray, perhaps, but not really worth the suffering in a sauce.
The ají dulce Dave mentions is a curious variant of the habanero, and is used extensively in Venezuelan cooking, because Venezuelans like the flavour, but not the heat.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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USA,Michigan
The key to these peppers is the intense flavor they bring with only a tiny pinch of the ground peppers added to the salsa, or sauce. You have to carefully balance the amount of amount of heat, and flavor to get the result you desire, add just a very little, let it cook for a few minutes and taste. Again, You can always add more if needed. Once in the sauce, it can't be removed.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

Andy M.

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Sep 1, 2004
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49,610
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Massachusetts
...LEFT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Burns: [/FONT][FONT=Times New Roman, serif]I didn’t mention it, but you brought it up. The pain receptor system detects both pain and temperature, with the same delay. That’s why it takes a moment for the ‘heat’ to hit when you eat a hot pepper. [/FONT] [/LEFT]


Not sure you can compare a thermal burn to a chemical burn.
 

jennyema

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Joined
Mar 1, 2002
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10,469
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Boston and Cape Cod
I still enjoy eating spicy food, especially foods cooked with fruity peppers like habanero and scotch bonnets.

Buy as I get older, my digestive system does not concur :wacko:
 

taxlady

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near Montreal, Quebec
I still enjoy eating spicy food, especially foods cooked with fruity peppers like habanero and scotch bonnets.

Buy as I get older, my digestive system does not concur :wacko:

Yeah, I wonder why that is. It hasn't happened to me, but it does to my DH, who is 15 years younger than me.

I have heard of it happening to other people too.
 
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