Is there a way to bake pizza at low temperatures?

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Cooking4Fun

Senior Cook
Joined
Jun 23, 2020
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Buffalo
I was wondering if pizza can bake between 350F and 400F? I would like to bake pizza with olive oil on pan instead of something less healthy, but the smoke point of olive oil is about 400F. Any special dough modifications that can make that possible?
 

pepperhead212

Executive Chef
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
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Woodbury, NJ
I used to bake deep dish pizza at 400°, starting with a generous amount of olive oil on the dough, and, depending on the topping, bake the topping, minus the cheese, following with the cheese for the last several minutes. The bottom would be crunchy, and the deep dish also froze, and reheated well.
 

cookiecrafter

Senior Cook
Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
296
Location
Chicago
When I make cheese pizza, I bake the pizza bread first. Lightly brushed with evoo and bake 375 for 10 or 12 minutes. Brush with sauce, generous moz cheese, and in oven till cheese melts.
 

Badjak

Senior Cook
Joined
Dec 24, 2010
Messages
188
You sure can!
Go for pan pizza or high hydration though.
Make a poolish, or just a pinch of yeast and slow rise for better flavour.
Lots of good books out there for "home oven" pizza.
I like Ken Forkish pizza book. (I lower hydration when I bake in the ooni at high heat)
 

caseydog

Master Chef
Joined
Jan 19, 2017
Messages
5,796
Location
Dallas
You can cook pizza at regular home oven temperatures. It will take longer, and the results will be somewhat different, but still good tasting pizza.

Like cookiecrafter said, you may want to pre-bake your dough crust for a while to give it a head start. I start with a pre-baked crust for my homemade pizzas (and I like a thin crispy crust pizza). Then, you are just heating your sauce and toppings, and melting the cheese. That takes me about ten minutes at 400F.

CD
 

Aunt Bea

Master Chef
Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
7,836
Location
near Mount Pilot
I would make a conventional pizza and dress it with a small amount of good olive oil when it is screaming hot from the oven

The heat of the pizza will help to release the fresh flavor of the olive oil.

1670416755067.jpeg
 

dcSaute

Sous Chef
Joined
Apr 24, 2011
Messages
948
I use olive oil in my home made crust and bake at 550'F on a stone that has been preheating about an hour.
the crust never gets to 400'F - the oil does not smoke or burn
IMG_1666.JPG
 

Cooking4Fun

Senior Cook
Joined
Jun 23, 2020
Messages
220
Location
Buffalo
You sure can!
Go for pan pizza or high hydration though.
Make a poolish, or just a pinch of yeast and slow rise for better flavour.
Lots of good books out there for "home oven" pizza.
I like Ken Forkish pizza book. (I lower hydration when I bake in the ooni at high heat)
poolish?
 

Real Help

Assistant Cook
Joined
Nov 29, 2022
Messages
36
Location
Romania
I make a pizza that isn't the popular version you are used to. Maybe it's not even pizza, idk. Probably an Italian would cuss me for the way I make pizza, but this was the agreeable choice for my family and me.
I make the pizza crust slightly thicker than what you normally see and crunchy but only on the outside, the inside is fluffy, which I overload with toppings of peperoni and such.
Then I bake the pizza for 50 minutes on 150 degrees Celsius (302 F) in the preheated oven. For me, for us it's a delight.
The ratios I use for the crust are:
- 1 egg.
- 150 ml yogurt.
- 1 teaspoon of sugar.
- 1 teaspoon and a half of salt.
- 350 g flour (12,34 ounces).
- 20 grams fresh yeast (0,7 ounces). Or if I am using dried yeast, I go with 8 grams (0,2 ounces).
- 2 tablespoons of oil. I usually use sunflower oil, but you can replace it with olive oil as well.
I don't know about the healthy thing though, it's kinda rich in fat because of the toppings I use, and the ridiculous amount of mozzarella, but I guess you can customize it as you wish.
 

caseydog

Master Chef
Joined
Jan 19, 2017
Messages
5,796
Location
Dallas

I found this online. It sounds similar to a sourdough starter???

What is Poolish?​

Poolish is a highly fluid yeast-cultured dough. It’s a type of pre-ferment traditionally used in the production of French bakery products.

A Poolish resembles a sponge for the sponge and dough system. The difference is Poolish is fermented much longer and uses a much higher hydration than a plastic sponge—which is why it’s considered the liquid version of a sponge. Typical hydration levels are 100%, with equal weights of flour and water.


CD
 

Badjak

Senior Cook
Joined
Dec 24, 2010
Messages
188
No cabbage on the Polish? :)

But yeah, poolish or bigga is like a sourdough starter, except it isn't sourdough ...
It can be a piece of dough left over from a previous bake, or you start with a small amount of dough. Let the yeast (very little bit) do it's thing, then use this to make the final dough
 

Cooking4Fun

Senior Cook
Joined
Jun 23, 2020
Messages
220
Location
Buffalo
I make a pizza that isn't the popular version you are used to. Maybe it's not even pizza, idk. Probably an Italian would cuss me for the way I make pizza, but this was the agreeable choice for my family and me.
I make the pizza crust slightly thicker than what you normally see and crunchy but only on the outside, the inside is fluffy, which I overload with toppings of peperoni and such.
Then I bake the pizza for 50 minutes on 150 degrees Celsius (302 F) in the preheated oven. For me, for us it's a delight.
The ratios I use for the crust are:
- 1 egg.
- 150 ml yogurt.
- 1 teaspoon of sugar.
- 1 teaspoon and a half of salt.
- 350 g flour (12,34 ounces).
- 20 grams fresh yeast (0,7 ounces). Or if I am using dried yeast, I go with 8 grams (0,2 ounces).
- 2 tablespoons of oil. I usually use sunflower oil, but you can replace it with olive oil as well.
I don't know about the healthy thing though, it's kinda rich in fat because of the toppings I use, and the ridiculous amount of mozzarella, but I guess you can customize it as you wish.
Italians can complain all they want. Pizza predates them by at least 100 years. Lol.
 

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