Kobe Beef?

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my_psychosis

Senior Cook
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Sep 11, 2006
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Iowa
What is Kobe Beef, and does anybody have a recipe they will share?
Please and Thank you.:chef:
 

Scotch

Head Chef
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Oct 3, 2006
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California
It's not a recipe or a dish but a particular kind of beef from Japan. It's EXTREMELY expensive and very hard to find in the U.S. Here's a link for more information: CLICK ME

p.s. -- You can join a Kobe Beef of the Month Club for only $1,439.99 per year. That gets you 4 steaks per month, except in March and November when you get 12 burger patties. Such a deal! CLICK ME
 

qmax

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Puget Sound convergence zone
Kobe beef is from a breed of cattle raised in Japan. They are raised on beer, sake, regularly massaged. Extremely marbled meat. HUGELY expensive.

You can use Kobe beef in any beef recipe, but you would probably want to pick a recipe that highlights the nature of the meat. Don't even dream of cooking it well.
 

ChefJune

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Kobe beef is Japanese beef of the Wagyu breed. Some Wagyu beef is now being raised in US, but it is not Kobe. I don't know too much about it, but I imagine if you google it you will find some information.
 

my_psychosis

Senior Cook
Joined
Sep 11, 2006
Messages
161
Location
Iowa
It's not a recipe or a dish but a particular kind of beef from Japan. It's EXTREMELY expensive and very hard to find in the U.S. Here's a link for more information: CLICK ME

p.s. -- You can join a Kobe Beef of the Month Club for only $1,439.99 per year. That gets you 4 steaks per month, except in March and November when you get 12 burger patties. Such a deal! CLICK ME

It's not a recipe or a dish but a particular kind of beef from Japan
This explains why I could not find a recipe, Thank you. :chef:

Thank you to all who responded also. :chef:
 

black chef

Senior Cook
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Jul 2, 2006
Messages
383
if you're near houston, texas, go down to Central Market (HEB) on Westheimer and 610.

they have wagyu beef there, and you can get the ribeye cut for $38/pound. once a month or so, i buy one 1-1/4 inch thick, approximately 1.5 lb steak.

i season it with salt and pepper (2:1 ratio) let it get to room temperature, sprinkle it down with some dried and "powdered" porcini mushroom and I sear it on both sides for 4 - 5 minutes. let it rest for 5 minutes and ENJOY.

you haven't had beef until you've had a GOOD piece of wagyu beef... the taste & texture are of another world.
 

BreezyCooking

Washing Up
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A number of years ago, back when Kobe beef was just becoming a hot item in the U.S., I had a phenomenal birthday meal at a local restaurant of a perfectly cooked medium-rare Kobe-beef filet mignon served on a bed of wasabi mashed potatoes, separated by a "raft" of steamed Broccolini. I don't usually wax rhapsodic about restaurant meals - but this was fabulous. I still remember every bite - lol!!
 

powerplantop

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Louisiana
Most Kobe beef in the US is a mix breed of cow with Wagyu DNA. A few Wagyu cows were exported before a loop hole was closed. Some cows are raised in the US with a high ratio of Wagyu DNA. Also they are not raised under the same conditions they would be in Japan.

The US raised Kobe beef is not quite the same as what you can find in Japan. But still very fine beef.

In Japan I ate Kobe beef. It was quite the experince (but glad that I was not paying). The best was the Kobe sashimi. Its hard to explain but due to the high fat content it was almost like eating beef flavored butter (in a good way).
 

my_psychosis

Senior Cook
Joined
Sep 11, 2006
Messages
161
Location
Iowa
if you're near houston, texas, go down to Central Market (HEB) on Westheimer and 610.

they have wagyu beef there, and you can get the ribeye cut for $38/pound. once a month or so, i buy one 1-1/4 inch thick, approximately 1.5 lb steak.

i season it with salt and pepper (2:1 ratio) let it get to room temperature, sprinkle it down with some dried and "powdered" porcini mushroom and I sear it on both sides for 4 - 5 minutes. let it rest for 5 minutes and ENJOY.

you haven't had beef until you've had a GOOD piece of wagyu beef... the taste & texture are of another world.


I'm in a small town in Iowa, but we are planing a trip to Des Moines soon. I plan to find a good market and try this recipe. Thank you!
 

ChefJune

Master Chef
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Metro New York
Just a word of caution: don't salt your steak until just before you cook it. Salting the meat in advance helps to pull the natural moisture out of it, and can result in dry steak. :ermm:
 

GB

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Just a word of caution: don't salt your steak until just before you cook it. Salting the meat in advance helps to pull the natural moisture out of it, and can result in dry steak. :ermm:
While it is true that salting draws out moisture that is not the whole story. Salting steak ahead of time (say 24 hours or so) is an excellent technique known as dry brining that does not result in dry meat. Initially the salt draws moisture out, but then if you wait a little bit that now salty liquid in then drawn back into the meat and seasons the entire piece from the inside out.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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I'm sure you've heard of Champaigne. But Champaigne is not Champaigne unless it is created in the Champaigne Valley of France. The same is true of several other famous foods. Kobe beef is the same as well. It is a particular breed of beef grown in the Kobe' Valley of Japan. It is a highly prized and pricey product. Beef in general is very expensive in Japan as most of it is imported due to little land mass. What others have stated about Wagyu Beef in the U.S. is correct. It originated from the Kobe' Beef stock in Japan before it became illigal to export the famous breed's sperm cells. It is a closely guarded product.

Do just a bit of research and you will find many varieties of fine cheese from France, Spain, England, and other countries that reserve the name of that product according to strict manufacturing processes, and only in the region of origin for that product. Many are the wines, and vinagers that share this trait. Kobe' beef is the only meat I know of that is as closely guarded.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
 

my_psychosis

Senior Cook
Joined
Sep 11, 2006
Messages
161
Location
Iowa
Just a word of caution: don't salt your steak until just before you cook it. Salting the meat in advance helps to pull the natural moisture out of it, and can result in dry steak. :ermm:

Wow. Thank you, I never knew this. I love a juicy medium rare myself but my boyfriend loves dry burnt meat. :)sick::sick: Icky, I know)
This will help to make them right for each of us.
:chef:
 

Bigjim68

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Richmond, Va
Mislabelling a product to create the impression of a superior product is a pet peeve of mine. A chain restaurant here lists an american kobe hamburger. Most beef sold as Kobe in US is probably Waygu, and may or may not meet the standards of Kobe. Cheeses are commonly mislabeled. Try to find a Swiss made swiss. To the wine industries credit, I find less mislabeled wines than in most food products. I have never seen an american Bordeaux or Burgundy or Chianti, except maybe in jug wines. One product that has gained favor as a superior product is Angus Beef. This is a brand name, not an indication of quality. There is even a USDA choice Angus listed on their web site.
 

BreezyCooking

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Mislabelling a product to create the impression of a superior product is a pet peeve of mine. A chain restaurant here lists an american kobe hamburger. Most beef sold as Kobe in US is probably Waygu, and may or may not meet the standards of Kobe. Cheeses are commonly mislabeled. Try to find a Swiss made swiss. To the wine industries credit, I find less mislabeled wines than in most food products. I have never seen an american Bordeaux or Burgundy or Chianti, except maybe in jug wines. One product that has gained favor as a superior product is Angus Beef. This is a brand name, not an indication of quality. There is even a USDA choice Angus listed on their web site.

Whoa there!! First off, how the heck do you get any shopping done what with all that label checking? Good grief! :LOL:

Second - "Angus" beef is not only an indication of quality, it's a BREED. Both Black & Red Angus beef are considered superior beef. As is Charolais. As is Hereford. As is Wagyu/Kobe. It's all in the mouth of the beholder, & you have no business laying down determining whether it's quality or not. That's just your opinion.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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Whoa there!! First off, how the heck do you get any shopping done what with all that label checking? Good grief! :LOL:

Second - "Angus" beef is not only an indication of quality, it's a BREED. Both Black & Red Angus beef are considered superior beef. As is Charolais. As is Hereford. As is Wagyu/Kobe. It's all in the mouth of the beholder, & you have no business laying down determining whether it's quality or not. That's just your opinion.

Hold the phone, everyone. There is indeed a brand of beef called "Angus Beef". Just as there is a brand of ground beef called "All Beef Patties". The company that owns the brand may grow the breed Angus, or Black Angus. But just because they own the brand name, doesn't gaurantee that the product they sell is equal to the name.

There is a restaurant chain called "Black Angus" that own their own cattle ranches and do serve the breed "Black Angus" exclusively. And you can expect that the steaks they sell are of superior quality. But I dont' really know enough about the owner company of the Angus Beef brand to say whether or not they sell true Black or red Angus Beef.

I think that I am restating the idea that BigJim68 was trying to make. Misrepresentation is commonplace in industry. For instance, there are multiple versions of the Excedrin product whose name would suggest that the particular version has been specially formulated for a specific treatment, when in fact, there are several different versions of the product, each with a specific name, such as Excedrine Migraine, or Excedrine Extra Strength, with exactly the same ingredients.

For those who aren't savvy about beef grading in the U.S., there are many supermarkets that will highlight "Select" beef as if it were of higher quality than what they normally sell, when in fact, USDA Select is lower quality and good only for ground beef and stewing. Are the stores lying about the select beef? No they aren't. But they are trying to pull the wool over the eyes of the uneducated meat buyer.

I don't like the suggestive labeling practices of many companies. So I read labels and try to remain educated about products. We all need to do that.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
 

Bigjim68

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Richmond, Va
GW. Thanks for restating my case. I don't mean to imply that Kobe, Angus (correctly Certified Angus), or other designations are indications of an inferior product. They can be, and often are, superior products. I am saying that brand names are brand names, and exist to set a product apart from others on the shelf. Only a few products are government graded, and even within grades there exists a wide difference in quality. IMO great food starts with great ingredients, and it takes only a short while to acquaint yourself with quality issues. I see Kobe going the way of Angus, Select, Choice, Prime, etc. i.e. being used as a marketing tool with little or no regard to the actual quality of the product. Kobe is a city in Japan, and produces a limited quantity of meat raised in a special way. Most of it is sold in Japan. It would not surprise me to learn that more Kobe is sold in NYC than is produced in Kobe.
 

danpeikes

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Jul 3, 2007
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Chicago
If I rember correctly, and no I have not confirmed this, but I remeber AB saying on episode of ICA that "America Kobe" is Waygu that has been bred together with black angus. Yes both of these are brand names. I would assume that much of this meat is high grade due to the great DNA, but I would guess that not all this meat is high grade. Just my $.02
 
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