La Mian Dough

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lukayl

Assistant Cook
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
4
Hey all i know that someone already post a thread to ask about it but there was no answer so i tought that maybe the thread has been out or i don't know

so HERE IS MY QUESTION hehehehehe:


Does someone have a REAL ''La mian'' noodles (HAND PULLED noodles) dough recipe??

I search for the original or the most official recipe of La mian cause all the videos on youtube show how to pull, but never the recipe or even on the internet... i found one (Hand-pulled Noodles - Chinese Cuisine)
but does someone could please tell me if it's like the original one please


Thank YOU alot :)
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

Certified/Certifiable
Joined
Aug 26, 2004
Messages
12,454
Location
USA,Michigan
I found this recipe on line:

  • 156 grams cake flour
  • 25 grams all purpose flour
  • 110 grams warm water
  • 2 grams salt
  • 1 gram baking soda
  • 6 grams vegetable oil
The same site stated that for every two cujps of flour, use 1 cup of water. The baking soda makes the dough alkaline which weakens the protein bonds, which allows the dough to pull more easily. The dough must be dusted with flour frequently to prevent the dough from sticking together.

Also, the dough must rest for about 20 minutes to allow the gluten to relax, and the moisture to distribute itself evenly in the dough. The baking soda also assists with this action. Heres the website where I got this info from:
How can you make noodles? Noodle and Pasta Recipes

I'm now looking forward to trying this myself. It would be a pretty great thing to bea able to do with others. It has real "cool" factor to it.;)
Hope this helps.

Seeeeey; Goodweed of the North
 

lukayl

Assistant Cook
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
4
I found this recipe on line:

  • 156 grams cake flour
  • 25 grams all purpose flour
  • 110 grams warm water
  • 2 grams salt
  • 1 gram baking soda
  • 6 grams vegetable oil
The same site stated that for every two cujps of flour, use 1 cup of water. The baking soda makes the dough alkaline which weakens the protein bonds, which allows the dough to pull more easily. The dough must be dusted with flour frequently to prevent the dough from sticking together.

Also, the dough must rest for about 20 minutes to allow the gluten to relax, and the moisture to distribute itself evenly in the dough. The baking soda also assists with this action. Heres the website where I got this info from:
How can you make noodles? Noodle and Pasta Recipes

I'm now looking forward to trying this myself. It would be a pretty great thing to bea able to do with others. It has real "cool" factor to it.;)
Hope this helps.

Seeeeey; Goodweed of the North

I Know for this recipe (but thanks) :)

but it seems that there is a secret ingredient ...not really secret but kind of hard to find, it's KANSUI or KAN SUI his chemical name is potassium bicarbonate that is a High alkally (sorry for my english spelling) that reacts with the gluten and give all the elasticity to the dough or some people say that you can also use LYE WATER (i don't know either what it is)

i guess you can find kansui in asian market but i'm not sure i'll search for it


but if you do it, take a picture to see the result ;)

ciao ciao
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

Certified/Certifiable
Joined
Aug 26, 2004
Messages
12,454
Location
USA,Michigan
I Know for this recipe (but thanks) :)

but it seems that there is a secret ingredient ...not really secret but kind of hard to find, it's KANSUI or KAN SUI his chemical name is potassium bicarbonate that is a High alkally (sorry for my english spelling) that reacts with the gluten and give all the elasticity to the dough or some people say that you can also use LYE WATER (i don't know either what it is)

i guess you can find kansui in asian market but i'm not sure i'll search for it


but if you do it, take a picture to see the result ;)

ciao ciao

The site I provided explains that the Kansui is derived from natural soda springs in Japan. It also states that you can substitute bicarbonae of soda, aka baking soda and achieve the same results. The idea is that the alkaline ingredient- kansui, baking soda, or lye water, helps to break down the gluten a bit, allowing it to "relax". This allows you to pull the dough easier, without it breaking so easily. You must allow the dough to rest as well, to allow the moisture to evenly distribute itself while the gluten relaxes. Read the information provided on the site. It explains everything pretty well.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
 

lukayl

Assistant Cook
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
4
The site I provided explains that the Kansui is derived from natural soda springs in Japan. It also states that you can substitute bicarbonae of soda, aka baking soda and achieve the same results. The idea is that the alkaline ingredient- kansui, baking soda, or lye water, helps to break down the gluten a bit, allowing it to "relax". This allows you to pull the dough easier, without it breaking so easily. You must allow the dough to rest as well, to allow the moisture to evenly distribute itself while the gluten relaxes. Read the information provided on the site. It explains everything pretty well.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

HMMMMM i see, thank i'll read all the thing cause i searched and some people were saying that sodium bicarbonate was less effective than potasium bicarbonate but i'll search and read more , thank you :)
 

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