Making turkey gravy

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MV Owner

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Hi All.


Hope you are all well and staying safe



For this years Christmas lunch I am cooking turkey and as part of that I am making turkey gravy. This in the main consists of a gravy based on:-


The giblets
chicken stock
cider
tomatoes
Rosmary
Turkey juices
onion
crispy bacon
Lemon



This gravy usually works out really well and I cook it as the turkey is resting. I know you would all know that when the turkey is resting a lot of other cooking is still going on which means things are hectic!!!


So I intend to make this on Christmas Eve (except for the turkey juices) but then add the turkey juices on the day. These juices of course include fat from the turkey which I drain off


My question to the forum is considering time is on my time on Christmas Eve I could make the gravy as per usual which takes around 30 minutes of frying / boiling or alternatively I could really slowly fry and boil the gravy over say a couple of hours (a bit like a tradtional soup I suppose)


I would appreciate thoughts on which method is likely to give a more tasty result


Many thanks










MV
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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Make the gravy as you usually would, the night befor, except fr adding the roasting pan juices., and thickener. On the day of the meal, heat the broth you made, add the turkey pan juices, and thicken with roux, or cornstarch slurry.

As the broth sits in the fridge, the flavors will develop evenly through the broth, like how chili, or pasta sauce is always better the next day.

If you really want to save time, roast your turkey the day before, and make your broth accordingly. Carve the bird by removing the breasts, thighs, and drumsticks, wings, and back meat. Place them into a suitable container, and pour the pan juices over the turkey meat. Cover, and refrigerate. On the holiday, place the roasting pan into a 300; F. oven, with a thermometer. Pull the turkey out when it reaches 145' F., and pour the pan juices into the broth. Thicken the broth to make gravy. This also grantees you moist, and tender turkey meat, with full flavor, as the met absorbs some of the drippings, and flavor.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

Seeeeya; Cief Longwind of the North.
 

MV Owner

Assistant Cook
Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
18
Location
london
Excellent and many thanks, I am going to go with certain parts of what you said and bake the turkey parts the day before. In answer to my question would you cook the broth (with or without the turkey juices) using my usual 30 minute timeframe or slower say 2 hours
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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Aug 26, 2004
Messages
12,454
Location
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With the juices, and thirty minutes should be sufficient. Seasoning is all important. Taste test after 10 minutes, after adding any seasonings, and adjust.. Those giblets, heart, liver, and neck meat are great chopped up and added to the turkey dressing.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 
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