New Weber Rotisserie

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roadfix

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I just got a new rotisserie for my Weber kettle and decided to try it on something fairly easy. A 4lb tri-tip. I applied S&P and garlic rub on it and grilled it over direct heat until the internal temp reached 140°F. I added a couple of chunks of red oak at the beginning of the cook with the dome closed for smoke. Tri-tip is one of those kinds of cuts where you treat it like a huge chunk of steak, not a roast.
 

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CraigC

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Looks great! Tri-tip must be a cut that has a cultural background? It is almost impossible to find it here. I've always wanted to try one either on the grill or smoker.

Craig
 

Selkie

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I just got a new rotisserie for my Weber kettle and decided to try it on something fairly easy...

Congratulations!!

I've never used one but often thought about getting one. Let us know how it works out for you.

My dad had one while I was growing up and used it maybe twice in ten years. I suppose he thought it was more trouble than it was worth, but the rotisserie chicken that I've had since, usually from the deli at the market, especially when it's properly seasoned with lots of salt and pepper, is sweet, tender, juicy and just plain fantastic! :mrgreen: MUCH better than fried! :cool:
 

taxlady

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Congratulations!!

I've never used one but often thought about getting one. Let us know how it works out for you.

My dad had one while I was growing up and used it maybe twice in ten years. I suppose he thought it was more trouble than it was worth, but the rotisserie chicken that I've had since, usually from the deli at the market, especially when it's properly seasoned with lots of salt and pepper, is sweet, tender, juicy and just plain fantastic! :mrgreen: MUCH better than fried! :cool:

My dad was an engineer. He built a rotisserie for our plain, round, charcoal grill in the '60s. We had rotisserie chicken almost every weekend in the summers. Yum.
 

roadfix

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Thanks. Tri-tips are very popular out here in the west, particularly in Ca where this particular cut has some history behind it. Traditionally, they're grilled over red oak on a Santa Maria style grill and cooked to medium at most. I bought this particular cut on sale for $1.99/lb.

I've never owned a rotisserie until this one. I plan on modifying the Weber kettle and the rotisserie unit slightly by making it more air tight for low and slow smoking. The rotis assembly is not air tight and feeds too much oxygen to the coals to keep the temps down for long smokes.
 

pacanis

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I saw a tri-tip at the same store I saw and bought a flank steak in. It looked to be too big for just me and I wasn't sure how to cut it in half, lol.

Ahhh, the sound of electric rotisserie motors, struggling to get the heavy end up and over... childhood memories. I think with beer can chicken being so popular now, rotisseries are almost getting phased out. It is no longer "the way" to do chicken. Good thing for big hunks of beef.
 

Andy M.

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I saw a tri-tip at the same store I saw and bought a flank steak in. It looked to be too big for just me and I wasn't sure how to cut it in half, lol....


I remember seeing a guide on how to slice a tri-tip for serving. It may have had something about dividing it as well. I don't remember.

I think I googled how to cook a tri-tip or similar.
 

roadfix

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Ahhh, the sound of electric rotisserie motors, struggling to get the heavy end up and over... childhood memories.

This unit came with a hefty counterweight which attaches at the opposite end of the rod. I'll probably need it when roasting a 15lb turkey...:mrgreen:

But I agree, rotisseries are not as popular as they once were. In fact, I think Weber even discontinued their rotisserie kits for a while a little while back.
 

roadfix

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I did spareribs today on the rotiss. It went for about 4 hours @ about 275° on a basket of charcoal. A clay potting saucer is covered in foil for easy cleanup. The saucer shields the direct heat and provides thermal mass for steady temps.
 

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Roll_Bones

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Looks great! Tri-tip is simply not available here in the East.

Our local Costco has them year round. They also sell butter in the one pound western style square. I also occasionally see them in the grocery store.

I remember seeing a guide on how to slice a tri-tip for serving. It may have had something about dividing it as well. I don't remember.

I think I googled how to cook a tri-tip or similar.

It is sliced exactly how you would slice a London Broil. Across the grain.
You cook it like London Broil too. Rare or medium rare, over or under direct high heat.

Its very good, but a bit pricey here. I think its in the $7 a pound price range. Similar to steak prices.
 

Andy M.

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