Oil - what kind for general use?

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Andy M.

Certified Pretend Chef
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My every day oil for frying is canola or corn oil. I also have peanut oil for high temp...

Actually, canola and corn oils have smoke points in the same range as peanut oil.

I have found every source of smoke point temperatures for fats differs a little from the others. There seems to be a consensus that these three oils are in the mid 400s for smoke points.

A lot depends on how much an oil has been refined. A highly refined peanut oil, for example, will have a higher smoke point than a less refined peanut oil.
 

oneoffour

Senior Cook
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Jul 1, 2007
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Levittown Pa
Hey Andy wondering about that refinement and the effect on smoke point. Given that putting salt in to water raises the point at which it boils. What if salt or something else could be added to oil and raise the smoke point?
 

Andy M.

Certified Pretend Chef
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Sep 1, 2004
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49,806
Location
Massachusetts
I don't the answer to that for sure but my instinct tells me that would't work.

Maybe someone else has a better answer.
 

luvs

Master Chef
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Aug 24, 2004
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da 'burgh
i keep several kinds of oils/fat for my food, although if i were gonna keep a couple for general broad use- i'd keep canola & a EV olive. except for veal & delicate dishes, the olive would be for uncooked foods like salads & bread-dipping, the canola more for daily cooking.
 

mexican mama

Senior Cook
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Aug 5, 2009
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Vegetable oil or canola oil for everyday cooking...i like it coz it has no after taste and you can cook anything with it
 

Alix

Everymom
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Edmonton, Alberta
Hey Andy wondering about that refinement and the effect on smoke point. Given that putting salt in to water raises the point at which it boils. What if salt or something else could be added to oil and raise the smoke point?

Salt actually lowers the temperature at which water would boil. It lowers the "activation energy" required for a reaction to take place. I think it must do the same thing to the oil according to the link mcnerd posted for us.
 

tzakiel

Cook
Joined
Dec 31, 2008
Messages
99
For me, it's simple:

High heat - vegetable oil
Low heat - olive oil
Raw - extra virgin olive oil
Fries - peanut oil
 

black chef

Senior Cook
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
383
for every day cooking = rice bran oil.
for high-heat cooking = rice bran oil
for deep-frying = rice bran oil
for salad dressings = evoo (frantoia)
for Asian salad dressings = rice bran oil

rice bran oil is proven to have LOTS of health benefits... the highest smoke point, and it has a very neutral taste.
 

CookLikeJulia

Senior Cook
Joined
Jan 8, 2010
Messages
479
Location
Washington, D.C.
Macadamia Nut Oil is quit expensive but it the best oil , This oil has a delicious, light macadamia nut flavor, making it especially complementary to fish, chicken, vegetables, baked goods, and salads. Its high smoking point also makes macadamia nut oil ideal for stir-frying and sautéing. Like olive oil, macadamia nut oil is highly monounsaturated. Look for macadamia nut oil in health food and specialty stores. You can use this if you really want a good result.
 
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