Pork Roast:

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Roxy

Senior Cook
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
153
This turned out very tender and it was good!



Pork Roast:

Put some Olive Oil or Vegetable Oil in a skillet that will fit the pork roast; heat oil.

Flour both sides of pork roast with flour; add to skillet and lightly brown on both sides.

Slice white onions, to taste; chop garlic, to taste.

Put in large roasting pan,

Peel enough Russet Potatoes that you need; cut in half and wash in colander.

Wash a package of baby carrots and a package of sliced fresh mushrooms in colander.

Put all the veggies in large roasting pan pan; season veggies with pepper.

Pour 2 containers of Kitchen Basics Unsalted Vegetable Broth over veggies; put rack on top.

When the pork roast is lightly brown on both sides; put on rack.

Coat one side of the pork roast with 1 bag of Liptons Onion Soup Mix; flip and coat the other side with another bag of Liptons Onion Soup Mix.

Put lid on and bake at 220 degrees all day.

I put it in the oven around 10 am and we ate at 8 or so.

The longer it bakes. The more tender it will be!

Gravy:

1/4 Cup Butter
1/4 Cup Flour
2 T. Wondra Flour
1 Pkg.McCormick Brown Gravy
Kitchen, Bouquet, To Taste
2 Cans Swanson’s Beef Broth
Milk, To Taste
Salt & Pepper, To Taste

In my silver pot, melt butter; whisk in flour and Wondra Flour.

Pour beef broth in; stir.

Whisk McCormick Brown Gravy; add some Kitchen Bouquet.

***The gravy wasn’t getting thick enough, so I added in 2 T. Wondra Flour; whisk.

Season with salt and pepper, to taste.
 

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caseydog

Master Chef
Joined
Jan 19, 2017
Messages
5,796
Location
Dallas
What cut of pork is that? From the photo and the description, it seems like you used a Pork Shoulder (AKA Pork Butt). That is a good cut for low and slow cooking.

CD
 

dragnlaw

Site Team
Staff member
Joined
Feb 16, 2013
Messages
7,904
Location
Waterdown, Ontario
Roxy, from your description I would not call that a roast but as casey says, it seems like a recipe for low and slow, aka braising or Slow Cooking in the oven. I would be a bit cautious of the salt content.

LOL - in either case it sounds rather delicious. :chef: Thanks!
 

Roll_Bones

Master Chef
Joined
Oct 19, 2013
Messages
5,694
Location
Southeast US
I made a Cuban style pork roast last Sunday. Went all the way with garlic stuffed into it and a 24 hour soak in my version of mojo.
Also made yellow rice (we like it better than white) and black beans. Had some tostone's as well.
Paired a cucumber, tomato. green onion salad dressed in oil, vinegar and seasonings. Homemade rolls finished out this task. We have no access to Cuban bread BTW.
The meat was roasted uncovered in the oven. The fragrance was alluring!

Got the shoulder on sale for 99¢ a Lb.
 

Roxy

Senior Cook
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
153
I made a Cuban style pork roast last Sunday. Went all the way with garlic stuffed into it and a 24 hour soak in my version of mojo.
Also made yellow rice (we like it better than white) and black beans. Had some tostone's as well.
Paired a cucumber, tomato. green onion salad dressed in oil, vinegar and seasonings. Homemade rolls finished out this task. We have no access to Cuban bread BTW.
The meat was roasted uncovered in the oven. The fragrance was alluring!

Got the shoulder on sale for 99¢ a Lb.
What cut of pork is that? From the photo and the description, it seems like you used a Pork Shoulder (AKA Pork Butt). That is a good cut for low and slow cooking.

CD
It was a pork shoulder and it wasn’t too salty, it turned out great!
 

cookiecrafter

Senior Cook
Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
296
Location
Chicago
If there was a cross bone, it was a pork butt. The pork shoulder and pork butt are one piece until cut apart. The pork shoulder is the better. The butt makes the best pulled pork. All comes down to what you want.
 

caseydog

Master Chef
Joined
Jan 19, 2017
Messages
5,796
Location
Dallas
If there was a cross bone, it was a pork butt. The pork shoulder and pork butt are one piece until cut apart. The pork shoulder is the better. The butt makes the best pulled pork. All comes down to what you want.

That's new to me. Pork Butt and Pork Shoulder are used interchangeably around here, if the blade bone (never heard the term cross bone, either) is removed, it is just a boneless shoulder or butt. Must be a Chicago vs Texas name difference.

Pork shoulder/butt is popular for Mexican carnitas down here. I love carnitas tacos.

CD
 

cookiecrafter

Senior Cook
Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
296
Location
Chicago
That's new to me. Pork Butt and Pork Shoulder are used interchangeably around here, if the blade bone (never heard the term cross bone, either) is removed, it is just a boneless shoulder or butt. Must be a Chicago vs Texas name difference.

Pork shoulder/butt is popular for Mexican carnitas down here. I love carnitas tacos.

CD
Pork in the midwest is totally different from Texas. Beef here is black angus.
 

caseydog

Master Chef
Joined
Jan 19, 2017
Messages
5,796
Location
Dallas
BTW, Angus beef is common all over Texas. Texas is the number one producer of beef cattle in the US, and a lot of it is Angus.

CD
 

Roll_Bones

Master Chef
Joined
Oct 19, 2013
Messages
5,694
Location
Southeast US
We called the Cuban style pork roast a "picnic" or "fresh ham". The single thigh bone type. With the thick fat cap that makes excellent chicharrones?
Where the shoulder has very little fat cap and has the blade bone.
I prefer the former due to the crispy skin you end up with. The one I made was a shoulder. The kind they make pulled pork with.
But I have seem several people smoke the fresh ham as well.
 

caseydog

Master Chef
Joined
Jan 19, 2017
Messages
5,796
Location
Dallas
Pork cuts are confusing because they are named differently in different places in the US. The USDA did set up 'universal' guidelines a while back, but they apparently aren't manditory, since names are still different in different places. It gets even more confusing when you converse with people in other countries. Same goes for international names for beef cuts.

Where I live, a 'butt,' 'Boston butt,' and a shoulder are all used for the part of the shoulder with the blade bone. If the blade bone has been removed, it is a 'boneless butt,' 'boneless Boston butt' or 'boneless shoulder'. My local Kroger mostly uses the name 'Boston butt.' The area below that is called a 'picnic' or 'picnic shoulder' or some variation on those two words. The most common cut in local grocery stores here is the but or Boston butt. I sometimes see picnic cuts, but not all the time.

The 'ham' cut comes from the hip area of the pig, not the shoulder -- at least that's how it is here. Referring to the 'picnic' cut as 'fresh ham' is confusing to me, because they come from different ends of the pig.

So, I'm not saying that anyone here is wrong, but just using their local/regional nomenclature, which varies.

Clear as mud?
 

caseydog

Master Chef
Joined
Jan 19, 2017
Messages
5,796
Location
Dallas
We called the Cuban style pork roast a "picnic" or "fresh ham". The single thigh bone type. With the thick fat cap that makes excellent chicharrones?
Where the shoulder has very little fat cap and has the blade bone.
I prefer the former due to the crispy skin you end up with. The one I made was a shoulder. The kind they make pulled pork with.
But I have seem several people smoke the fresh ham as well.

I use a butt/Boston butt for Cuban roast pork. I just like it better than the picnic cut. I don't recall what was used when my family lived in Puerto Rico, but I do seem to recall that they would sometimes make a big deal of it and cook a whole pig, cut it up, and blend the meats.

CD
 

taxlady

Chef Extraordinaire
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Sep 13, 2010
Messages
29,220
Location
near Montreal, Quebec
I was just dealing with the differing names of pork cuts in Danish. Some Danish recipes call for "skinkeschnitzel". That word is made up of the words for "ham" and for "schnitzel" (a German word meaning a cutlet. From Schnitz (“cut-off piece”).) So, what is ham schnitzel? Is it a thinly sliced piece of ham or is it just a cutlet from the ham portion of a pig? Well, it turns out, it is just a thinly cut piece of the ham portion of a pig, usually the inner thigh. It is fresh pork, not cured like ham. I needed to know because, every now and then, I come across an interesting Danish recipe where "skinkeschnitzel" is an ingredient.
 

Roll_Bones

Master Chef
Joined
Oct 19, 2013
Messages
5,694
Location
Southeast US
I use a butt/Boston butt for Cuban roast pork. I just like it better than the picnic cut. I don't recall what was used when my family lived in Puerto Rico, but I do seem to recall that they would sometimes make a big deal of it and cook a whole pig, cut it up, and blend the meats.

CD
Traditionally Cuban pork roast was a whole pig at Christmas time. And the Sunday table was usually just the shoulder.
The reason I can remember it so well is the fat cap that got super crispy. It was and is my favorite part. The Boston butt does not have this. But does have more meat.
 

caseydog

Master Chef
Joined
Jan 19, 2017
Messages
5,796
Location
Dallas
Traditionally Cuban pork roast was a whole pig at Christmas time. And the Sunday table was usually just the shoulder.
The reason I can remember it so well is the fat cap that got super crispy. It was and is my favorite part. The Boston butt does not have this. But does have more meat.

Okay, I'm confused again, because the Boston butt I buy has a fat cap.

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CD
 
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