Power went out during the canning process of pickled peppers

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larry_stewart

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So I picked a bunch of banana and shishito peppers and wanted to can them.
I followed a recipe that was about 50/50 water and cider vnegar, along with garlic, bay leaf and a few spices.

I followed the canning instructions exactly , preheated the jars, heated up he brine. placed garlic, spices and peppers in jars, added the hot brine , closed the lids, water was up to a boil, placed jars in and set my timer for the 10 minutes required ( 1/2 pints jars).

A few minutes into the process, the power went off. Needless to say, I wasnt very happy.

My intentions were to store the finish product in the fridge anyway, so im not sure how much difference it would make anyway.

I let the jars sit in the hot water for about 1/2 hour ( 20 more minutes longer than required when boiling), but obviously, it was under the required temp. When I realized the power wasn't coming on anytime soon, I decided too abandon the canning process.

Again, im storing them in the fridge , but what should I know or be aware of, considering what happened ?
 

GotGarlic

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Fridge pickles last for quite a long time, and it helps that they boiled for a fair amount of time. I'd eat them till they were gone.
 

pepperhead212

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Too late for this time, but you might look into a propane burner, to use outside. I usually do this outside, so I won't have all that heat and humidity going inside the house!

I don't think you'll have to worry about those, given the 50% vinegar. However, did you cut those peppers, or leave them whole? Whole peppers sometimes cause problems, even when processed the normal time.

 

larry_stewart

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Too late for this time, but you might look into a propane burner, to use outside. I usually do this outside, so I won't have all that heat and humidity going inside the house!

I don't think you'll have to worry about those, given the 50% vinegar. However, did you cut those peppers, or leave them whole? Whole peppers sometimes cause problems, even when processed the normal time.


Some I cut, others I made a long slit down the side. Both peppers I used were very thin skinned.
 

blissful

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That would be a bummer!

You must have an electric stove.

Could you have put it on the outdoor grill? If you have one?

How about a whole house generator? Overkill lol?

All for the love of peppers.
Sorry to hear it.
 

larry_stewart

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That would be a bummer!

You must have an electric stove.

Could you have put it on the outdoor grill? If you have one?

How about a whole house generator? Overkill lol?

All for the love of peppers.
Sorry to hear it.

Definitely could have been worse
I was cooking something else, and all of a sudden things got quiet , and I didnt hear the background bubbling noise. A first I thought, hmmm, maybe this thing haas a temperature control and just shut down for a few seconds, but then reality set in when the stove wasnt working either.

The canning system Is one of those separate , all in one , plug its in kinda things , so I dont need the stove to use it.

Luckily its something that can survive in the fridge regardless. Especially being home grown stuff, I really would have been annoyed if I had to chuck it.
 

blissful

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Anything that doesn't seal, anything not fully processed can be refrigerated and used. Or it can be repackaged and frozen (tomatoes, not pickles). Dehydrating is another option--this worked well for me for pinto beans and black beans that didn't seal--and those can be used in backpacking/camping meals. There's a few options for almost everything that fails for one reason or another in canning.
 

larry_stewart

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Anything that doesn't seal, anything not fully processed can be refrigerated and used. Or it can be repackaged and frozen (tomatoes, not pickles). Dehydrating is another option--this worked well for me for pinto beans and black beans that didn't seal--and those can be used in backpacking/camping meals. There's a few options for almost everything that fails for one reason or another in canning.

Got them in the fridge, so they should be fine ( as some of the other recipes were refrigerator versions).
Said to wait 3 days before trying so tomorrow will be my taste test. Im hoping things turn out well, as I have a bunch of other peppers id like to preserve.
 

Roll_Bones

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So I picked a bunch of banana and shishito peppers and wanted to can them.

This is my first season with shishito peppers. I got a late start on them but they are doing well. They are still in small containers.
I am always trying something new in my garden.
Tell me about shishito peppers. How you eat them and about the plants.
Thanks in advance
 

larry_stewart

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This is my first season with shishito peppers. I got a late start on them but they are doing well. They are still in small containers.
I am always trying something new in my garden.
Tell me about shishito peppers. How you eat them and about the plants.
Thanks in advance

This is my first year too.
As of now, the plant has been extremely productive and are healthy.
They are usually aa very mild pepper, but they say 1 out of 10 can be spicy (Haven't encountered that yet). If it keeps up at this rate Ill likely get more than 50 peppers from this single plant.

The only way I've had them so far has been quickly fried up with a little oil, then sprinkled everything bagel spices on top ( shaw it online somewhere). I wasnt overly crazy about it, but bought the plant prior to trying them. They are a A very thin skinned / fleshed pepper which , as mentioned above, are usually mild.

Ironically, all my other pepper plants are doing poorly. I tried pickling/ marinating them but due to the power outage, things didn't go so well. Tried one, and the taste is good, but mush. In the past ive done more of a refrigerator pickle with otter varieties of peppers, with no heat in the process, and the peppers marinated just fine and retained their crunch, so Ill probably try that with the next batch.
 

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