Raccoon, the other dark meat

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Uncle Bob

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PieSusan said:
I can't imagine being that hungry to be willing to give it a try
.

A small, young 'coon, cleaned properly is a treat in a braising pot. With BBQ sauce added towards the end, the tender meat makes a delicious sandwich. In a roux based gravy it is very good served over rice or mashed potatoes. While not weekly fare at Uncle Bob's house, it has been enjoyed on occasion.

Enjoy!!
 

buckytom

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bbq sauce? gravy?

tell me it ain't so, bob. please. tell me.


raccoonface.jpg
 

Uncle Bob

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:LOL: No can do BT......No can do! --- However if you ever eat supper with me I'll hold the coon...Maybe served Grilled/BBQed Pork Chops!

Wait!!! Maybe a 'Coon stir fry!! Water chestnuts, baby corn, bean sprouts, nappa, etc.:chef:
 

Uncle Bob

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Being a chicken farmer :LOL:, I hates raccoons to pieces. Get rid of them any way you can, including braising, stewing or frying.

....and I know you have seen what the masked bandits can do to a Sweet Corn Patch in a couple of nights!!!:ohmy: Really any corn, but oh how they love Sweet Corn...
 

Constance

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A guy who worked with Kim always had a problem with the coons getting his sweet corn, so one year he decided to outsmart them, and strung an electric fence around his corn when it was almost ready to pick. He went out that night after supper and turned it on, and slept peacefully, sure his corn was safe.
Problem being, the coons were already in the corn when he turned the fence on, and he had fenced them in, not out.

I have eaten raccoon...didn't care for it BBQ'd, but it was fine in the gumbo.

As for squirrel...that's good eating!
 

nekom

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Being a chicken farmer :LOL:, I hates raccoons to pieces. Get rid of them any way you can, including braising, stewing or frying.

I second that. No problems with them since I moved to the city, but I used to live at the edge of the woods, and keeping them out of garbage cans was nearly impossible. I had a burned-out metal fridge box with the garbage cans inside, chain link fence on top, and cinder blocks on top of that and they still got in there. But I think I'd pass on eating them.
 

kadesma

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yukkity yuk yuk, gag city, no thanks, no way, not ever....

kadesma
 

AllenOK

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I haven't tried 'coon myself. One of our dishwashers, years ago, brought in a cleaned 'coon and had us cook it in the smoker for him.

Of all the diseases that were mentioned in the comments of that article, the one that should really make people concerned about their 'coon is trichonosis. Animals get that by eating trash. That's why pork was also supposed to be cooked "well done", to kill the trichonella worm. But, bear meat and 'coon meat also needs to be cooked extremely well, to kill off the same worm.

I really like how they described the cooking process, two hours parboiling, then roast or smoke the critter.

I live out in the sticks, and have a large wooded area just across the street. I have yet to have my garbage invaded by anything other than the dogs down the street. We notice more coyotes than anything else.

Squirrels are even easier to take care of. Steel-toed boots, a jar of peanut butter, a slingshot, and a bag of marbles. Heck, that's legal inside city limits! Just make sure you have a hunting license.
 

sparrowgrass

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I have eaten coon, and it was fine, but I love all kinds of game--squirrel, bunny, deer, bear.

I don't like what they can do to chickens, and I don't like the fact that they can carry rabies and a particularly nasty roundworm that can migrate to the human eye or brain.

Knock wood, but I have not had any trouble with them in the garden. The potholes the dogs dig in the garden probably keep the coons away!
 

Uncle Bob

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Sparrowgrass said:
Knock wood, but I have not had any trouble with them in the garden. The potholes the dogs dig in the garden probably keep the coons away!

Plant several rows of sweet corn....they'll come from the next county to eat supper!!
 

pdswife

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I used to say I'd try anything once... but I've smelled just killed coon and I don't know if my nose would let me eat it. Maybe, it was ill or something but this guy didn't smell like a pretty rose! YUCK!!!!!!!!!
 

Leolady

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.

A small, young 'coon, cleaned properly is a treat in a braising pot. With BBQ sauce added towards the end, the tender meat makes a delicious sandwich. In a roux based gravy it is very good served over rice or mashed potatoes. While not weekly fare at Uncle Bob's house, it has been enjoyed on occasion.

Enjoy!!

My grandpa and grandma loved coon and fixed it like you are describing. I didn't cause I don't like dark meat.
 

tannerodell

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here in nebraska I have had everything from rattlesnake, to carp, and big ol bull frogs, but racoons new to me. I'll have to look into that though since I know they are around here alot. to bad skunk wouldnt be to good, because sometimes we run into those out by the fields. they are scarrier than a rattle snake to me. When we are out in the country, somehow they always find me to. And i go runnin for the hills
 

Maverick2272

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Growing up in the country I have had squirrel, coon, rabbit, deer, quail, pheasant, etc etc etc... if you can shoot it we can find a way to cook it up and eat it. In fact, that was a sort of 'law of the land' we had growing up.. never shoot anything you don't intend to eat.. that included pigeon downed by BB guns...last time we did that!
 

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