Recommended technique for making raspberry powder?

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johG

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Hi all!

I am thinking about making raspberry powder (by oven dehydrating raspberries and using a food processer to powder it). After thinking about the procedure for a while, I am questioning if I should dehydrate the raspberries and then powder, or if I should smash the raspberries, extract the juice and try to dehydrate the jucice. The reason for thinking about doing it with only the juice, is to avoid the seeds. Is the juice-dehydrating a stupid idea, or should I just do it as the way I originally thought (dehydrating the whole berry).

Also, if I use liquid glucose - should I then use the same scale/ratio if I were to use syrup or liquid sugar? I am thinking about using glucose instead of sugar in three things 1) ice cream, 2) chocolate delice and 3) a pear syrup. For the pear syrup, I was thinking about adding some xanthan gum to thicken the syrup a bit (reducng pear juice, sugar/glucose), as I don't want the syrup to be too runny, but not too firm either.

Edit: Do you think that I can manage to oven-dehydrate raspberries enough to make powder, or will it be too stick? I read a recipe which said that I should blanche the raspberries to "pop" the skin a bit, but that seems unnecessary to me.
 
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johG

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Chief Longwind Of The North

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Thanks, but I already have a sauce element (orange), but I would like to make a citrus zest powder and raspberry powder to go with the dish. The citrus zest powder shouldn't be a problem, but I'm not sure with the raspberry powder.

Raspberries tend to become a little leathery when dehydrated. Making them into powder is difficult. However, freeze-dried raspberries are easily made into a powder with a blender or food processor.

Caution with any kind of freeze-dried fruit, or powdered fruit; it is very hygroscopic and will easily absorb moisture from the air. It will then become gummy and very hard to work with. Once the powder is made, it will need to be put into a moisture-proof container.

Hope this helps.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

johG

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Dec 8, 2015
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Europe
Do you have a recipe or is this off the top of your head?
I would think a raspberry powder would be gritty.
Just a bit of improv. :chef:
The raspberry powder isn't necessary, but I think it would work nicely, especially if I could make it a bit acidic with some citric acid or something. If I could make the powder work as a powder, and not some gooey lump of something, I would definitely try.
 

johG

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Dec 8, 2015
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Location
Europe
I decided to buy some good freeze dried raspberries (cheating i know, but I haven't tried freeze drying before). I will vacuum seal the powder to prevent the powder to absorb moisture, thanks @Chief Longwind Of The North.

Do anyone of you have any answer to my second question (regarding glucose-ratio)?
 

johG

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Dec 8, 2015
Messages
19
Location
Europe
I forgot about this one. I cheated and bought pre-freeze dried raspberries, but it was easy to blend them afterwards - although the seeds inside the raspberries is making the powder a bit bland.

The rest is made from scratch;
- Rosemary and honey ice cream (with glucose)
- Chocolate delice
- Macerated orange segments (a bit of powdered citric acid and sugar); it really enhances the flavour!
- Rasberry fluid gel
- Macadamia and almond meal crumble

(Unfortunately the image is a bit blurry/shaky).
 

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