Red Gravy (Sausage)

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NickJayy

Assistant Cook
Joined
Jul 31, 2016
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Poway
Introduction: This recipe is a delicious red gravy (also called sauce to the fellas from the west coast) with tender Italian sausage rounds. This gravy goes great served on top of a plate of thin spaghetti or on a good Italian hard roll.

Ingredients:
Olive oil
1 Full clove of garlic, minced
2 onions finely chopped
3 feet of Italian sausage cut into 1 inch long pieces* (Spicy, sweet, mild, etc.)
2 cans of crushed tomatoes (avoid pre seasoned tomatoes)
2 cups fresh grated Parmesan cheese
Garlic powder
Onion powder
Salt
Fresh ground black pepper
Crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
Fresh parsley

Makes 3-4 servings.
Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 6-8 hours

Notes
*Try to get fresh sausage from a good Italian deli. If not, use one pack of preferred brand of Italian sausage.
Fresh parm is a must! Don't use Kraft or any of that junk.
Dried parsley can be substituted for fresh.
Be liberal with all seasonings.


1. Put enough olive oil in a deep sauce pan to thinly coat the bottom.
2. One the oil is heated, add garlic, onion, and sausage making an even layer in the pan.
3. Season with Garlic powder, Onion powder, salt, pepper, and crushed red pepper if you prefer a little heat.
4. Reduce heat to low and brown the sausage as long as possible without burning it. Try to get those crispy edges. (Be patient, let the sausage sit for about 10 minutes between stirring).
5. Add both cans of crushed tomatoes to sausage along with 1/4 of one of your tomato cans of water to give time for cooking.
6. Let the gravy heat up for about 10 minutes, and stir in your Parmesan cheese.
7. Season again with all listed in step 3. Add parsley to taste.
8. Reduce heat to low and stir every 30 minutes until sauce is very thick.
9. Taste, taste, taste. Re season if necessary.

And that's it folks, by the time your gravy has reduced enough, it will be about 6 to 8 hours. Your sausage should be more tender than any you've had off the grill or in a restaurant. And the flavor... Well you'll see for yourself.
This is a traditional red Italian gravy. NOTE find yourself a good stick of pepperoni from an Italian deli and add it in the pot at the same time as the sausage. It adds a great amount of flavor! Enjoy!
 

CraigC

Master Chef
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Messages
6,483
Welcome to DC! A couple questions. What size cans of tomatoes? One clove of garlic doesn't seem quite enough, depending on the amount of tomatoes, did you mean a head/bulb? You also have several ingredients with no amounts. I usually don't follow recipes for Sunday gravy, but a general idea would be nice.
 
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RPCookin

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Apr 20, 2005
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Logan County, Colorado
It's not only the west coast that calls it sauce. I'm 69 years old and I've lived in several areas (never on either coast - Minnesota, Montana, and now 43 years in Colorado), but I never heard it called gravy until reading a thread here a couple of years ago when Addie called it Sunday gravy. I had to ask what she meant. Apparently it's mostly an east coast term.

For my terminology, to be called "gravy" it must be mostly meat flavored, no tomatoes at all. But that's just how I grew up - I can't help it. :D
 
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GotGarlic

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It's not only the west coast that calls it sauce. I'm 69 years old and I've lived in several areas (never on either coast - Minnesota, Montana, and now 43 years in Colorado), but I never heard it called gravy until reading a thread here a couple of years ago when Addie called it Sunday gravy. I had to ask what she meant. Apparently it's mostly an east coast term.

For my terminology, to be called "gravy" it must be mostly meat flavored, no tomatoes at all. But that's just how I grew up - I can't help it. :D

I'd say it's a northeast thing ;) I've lived on the Mid-Atlantic coast for over 30 years and I also never heard that term before joining DC. I grew up in Michigan and we have the same definition you do for gravy :yum:
 

Dawgluver

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Apr 12, 2011
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I'd say it's a northeast thing ;) I've lived on the Mid-Atlantic coast for over 30 years and I also never heard that term before joining DC. I grew up in Michigan and we have the same definition you do for gravy :yum:


Having grown up and still living in the midwest, I'd never heard spaghetti sauce termed "gravy" either. Same definition for gravy as RP and GG's.
 

CraigC

Master Chef
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Jan 27, 2011
Messages
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I went to college with a guy from "Little Italy" on Long Island. That was in '76 and the first time I'd ever heard spaghetti sauce referred to as Sunday Gravy. I'd also never heard ricotta referred to as "Pot Cheese".

Its kind of funny that this recipe was posted today as I am making Sunday Gravy to go with the meatballs I made yesterday. I "baked" the meatballs on the Egg. The gravy I'm making today started with a "battuto" of carrots, celery and onion. Garlic was added once the "Itrilogy" had softened and cooked until fragrant. The vege were moved to form a well in the middle of the pot where I browned off some tomato paste. After mixing the vege and browned paste together, I added some red wine. Once the pot was mostly dry, 5# of canned whole, plum tomatoes went in along with some basil stalks parmesan bones and red pepper flakes. Oh, because the OP mentioned it, I threw in a 1/2 stick of pepperoni. It is gently simmering away. I'll remove the basil stalks and parmesan bones then motor boat it, adjust the seasonings later. The meatballs will go in to warm up once the gravy is ready. My pasta of choice will be Barilla, spaghetti rigati.:yum:
 

Addie

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East Boston, MA
It is mostly an East Coast term. What makes it a gravy according to Julia Child's definition, if there is meat in it, it is a gravy, if not, then it is a sauce. And here on the East Coast, Sunday Gravy always has meat balls, sausages, pork ribs, rolled beef and other meats in it. It is not a cheap gravy to make. But then all the Italian families I ever knew had a crowd over for Sunday dinner. Everyone went home to Mama's on Sunday. And when it came time to go back home, everyone brought a big dish with them. Poor Mam, never had leftovers for the week or freezer. But she wouldn't have it any other way. :angel:
 

GotGarlic

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It is mostly an East Coast term. What makes it a gravy according to Julia Child's definition, if there is meat in it, it is a gravy, if not, then it is a sauce.

I'd like to see a citation for that. A pan sauce made from the fond of sautéed meat or poultry is not gravy, unless a starch like flour is added.
 

GotGarlic

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
May 9, 2007
Messages
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Location
Southeastern Virginia
It is mostly an East Coast term. What makes it a gravy according to Julia Child's definition, if there is meat in it, it is a gravy, if not, then it is a sauce.

All righty then. Here's the answer: "Some*Italian Americans*on the*East Coast*and around the*Chicago area*refer to tomato sauce as "gravy", "tomato gravy", or "Sunday gravy", especially sauces with a large quantity of meat simmered in them, similar to the ItalianNeapolitan ragù. The term "Sunday gravy" derives from the Italian tradition of having a large, family dinner on Sunday afternoons. "Gravy" is an erroneous English translation from the Italian*sugo*which means juice, but can also mean sauce (as in*sugo per pastasciutta).[7]

The expression for "gravy" in Italian issugo d'arrosto, which is literally "juice of a roast" and is not specifically tomato sauce.[8]*Sicilian Americans*in communities like*Buffalo*and*Rochester,New York*use the terms "sarsa" and "succu" interchangeably for tomato sauces of all types used with pasta, and "gravy" only in reference to brown meat gravies."

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato_sauce
 

NickJayy

Assistant Cook
Joined
Jul 31, 2016
Messages
2
Location
Poway
Thanks, Craig! Iuse the 28 oz cans.and yes that was my fault, I usually use a complete bulb in my gravy. As far as the seasoning goes, I season several times throughout the cooking process. They really cook down. The best advice I can give is taste frequently and adjust what's needed.
 

CraigC

Master Chef
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Messages
6,483
Thanks, Craig! Iuse the 28 oz cans.and yes that was my fault, I usually use a complete bulb in my gravy. As far as the seasoning goes, I season several times throughout the cooking process. They really cook down. The best advice I can give is taste frequently and adjust what's needed.

Thanks for the pepperoni tip! I used the boat motor to chop it up so you can't find any pieces and it adds a great backround flavor to the gravy. I new that Charlie Daniels made sauce using sliced pepperoni, but this is the first time I've ever used it.
 

jennyema

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Mar 1, 2002
Messages
10,421
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Boston and Cape Cod
No one I know here except one of my friends (of Italian descent) calls it "gravy," they/we call it "sauce"

Thanks for the recipe!
 

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