Rib eye

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otuatail

Senior Cook
Joined
Nov 3, 2015
Messages
195
Location
York
Hi. My butcher was out of rump steak. I like this as it has better flavour for me than a fillet. Can someone tell me where does rib eye rank in these?
 

Roll_Bones

Master Chef
Joined
Oct 19, 2013
Messages
5,716
Location
Southeast US
My favorite cut. Rare to medium rare is a must. Prime Rib is at the very top of my list!
However. My wife does not like it cooked rare or MR. Its difficult to cook her steak the way she likes it as I'm afraid I am ruining it. But its never to done for her!
I have people tell me they want their steak "Done". WTF is that supposed to mean?

So the rib eye is the best cut if you must over cook it. (ruin it) It still stays tender. The extra fat and marbling is the key. I see other people when done with their steak leave fat and gristle on their plate.
When I'm finished there is nothing left on my plate.
 

Bama-Rick

Senior Cook
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
109
Location
LA, Lower Alabama aka Mobile
Rib Eye has a better flavor than Tenderloin. Fat is the key to flavor, Tenderloin is quite lean but very tender. Chuck Steak is very flavorful but a little tough, but less expensive than Rib Eye. Chuck Eye steak is the poor man's Rib Eye and is semi-tender but tasty.
To tenderize tough cuts of meat, soak the steak in one of the following liquids:

Marinades: These work the same as tenderizing powders but in a much more gentle fashion while imparting the flavors that make up the marinade. Common marinade ingredients are oil, vinegar, lemon juice, ginger, herbs, and pineapple juice. Marinades are great for tenderizing and seasoning.

Tea: Tea contains tannins which are a natural tenderizer. Soak meat in 1-2 cups of cooled black tea for up to 24 hours.

Coffee: The acidity in the coffee helps tenderize the meat and adds flavor. Soak beef in cooled coffee for up to 24 hours.

Cola: Like coffee, the acid in cola helps tenderize the meat. It also adds a subtle caramel flavor that is quite nice.

Baking Soda: Baking soda helps break down the meat protein. Just be sure you rinse well to remove all of the baking soda. Bake soda help form a nice crust on steak.

Wine: Contain tannins and acid which are both natural meat tenderizers and will impart some flavor to the beef, so be mindful of that. Soak for at least an hour before cooking.
 

dcSaute

Sous Chef
Joined
Apr 24, 2011
Messages
959
I'll go with bone in rib eye - with the cap meat being the absolute best taste/tender on the beef . . .

followed by flat iron - separated cuts of the main muscle...., sliced on the bias.
caution: the label name of "flat iron" has many 'local' interpretations - and some not so good.....

DW also prefers her beef with no red - so I sear the whole steak, both sides, finish in the oven - half way thru the finish I slice it half (a big one) slice hers half-thin so it finishes to her liking - for a individual her smaller steak, I slice it half thin about half way thru the oven finish. that way I get my MR and she gets her MW.

this is the flat iron 'style' I'm fond of:
[[ as a side bennie, the flat iron has a thin end and a thicker end. with a little practice I can oven finish it so the thin end is MW and the thicker end MR.]]
IMG_0442.JPG
 

Roll_Bones

Master Chef
Joined
Oct 19, 2013
Messages
5,716
Location
Southeast US
You should tell her that a well done stake is a sacrilege and it is just burnt.
I do and I have told her. She grew up in a home where any red or pink was considered under cooked. When my MIL lived with us she was shocked to see my steak and told me I was going to get sick.
One time I ordered oysters on the half shell when out with my wife's family. They must have had a field day talking about it.
My BIL would loudly proclaim " burn it" when asked how his steak should be cooked. It was directed at me. He was a jerk actually. Died and left his wife so many monetary problems when all he ever did was brag about his great jobs and all the money he made.
In actuality he had nothing. Spent every dime he made and saved nothing. Now my SIL is almost at poverty level.
 
Last edited:

IC 2.0

Cook
Joined
Aug 17, 2022
Messages
84
Location
Honolulu, HI
I'll go with bone in rib eye - with the cap meat being the absolute best taste/tender on the beef . . .

followed by flat iron - separated cuts of the main muscle...., sliced on the bias.
caution: the label name of "flat iron" has many 'local' interpretations - and some not so good.....

DW also prefers her beef with no red - so I sear the whole steak, both sides, finish in the oven - half way thru the finish I slice it half (a big one) slice hers half-thin so it finishes to her liking - for a individual her smaller steak, I slice it half thin about half way thru the oven finish. that way I get my MR and she gets her MW.

this is the flat iron 'style' I'm fond of:
[[ as a side bennie, the flat iron has a thin end and a thicker end. with a little practice I can oven finish it so the thin end is MW and the thicker end MR.]]
View attachment 62584

Agree, with your two choices. Ribeye is the absolute best. The cap (spinalis dorsi) is the most flavorful part of the entire cow.

Flat iron (might be labeled as top blade roast/steak, mock tender) is one of my favorite cuts as well, and it gets so overlooked. Very tender steak, and because it comes from the Chuck has so much more flavor than tenderloin.

Beyond that, in no particular order:

3. Porterhouse
4. Hanger
5. Chuck-eye
 

Roll_Bones

Master Chef
Joined
Oct 19, 2013
Messages
5,716
Location
Southeast US
Talking about ribeye caps reminded me that I bought some Prime sirloin caps at Costco.
Never saw them before and for Prime beef they were just a dollar more a pound than the sirloin.
They are extremely tender and have excellent taste.
The best part is I am seeing them every time I go there. Usually its a one time kinda thing.
 

IC 2.0

Cook
Joined
Aug 17, 2022
Messages
84
Location
Honolulu, HI
best cuts of steak.
Flank. The flank steak is one of the most popular cuts of beef. ...
New York Strip. The New York strip steak comes from a portion of the short loin. ...
Skirt. ...
Rib eye. ...
Prime Rib. ...
Tenderloin. ...
Sirloin. ...
Porterhouse.
Grab a $750 PayPal Gift Card Now!

Flank popular? It's extremely overpriced due to the fajita craze many years ago. I don't believe I've ever gone to a steakhouse and seen flank on the menu LOL
 

Andy M.

Certified Pretend Chef
Joined
Sep 1, 2004
Messages
49,838
Location
Massachusetts
Flank popular? It's extremely overpriced due to the fajita craze many years ago. I don't believe I've ever gone to a steakhouse and seen flank on the menu LOL
Agree. Fad cuts jump in price to capitalize on popularity. Short ribs, skirt steak, flank steak, pork belly, etc. have become much more expensive since they became popular. You have to come up with lower cost alternatives for your recipes.
 

jennyema

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Mar 1, 2002
Messages
10,523
Location
Boston and Cape Cod
Rib Eye has a better flavor than Tenderloin. Fat is the key to flavor, Tenderloin is quite lean but very tender. Chuck Steak is very flavorful but a little tough, but less expensive than Rib Eye. Chuck Eye steak is the poor man's Rib Eye and is semi-tender but tasty.
To tenderize tough cuts of meat, soak the steak in one of the following liquids:

Marinades: These work the same as tenderizing powders but in a much more gentle fashion while imparting the flavors that make up the marinade. Common marinade ingredients are oil, vinegar, lemon juice, ginger, herbs, and pineapple juice. Marinades are great for tenderizing and seasoning.

Tea: Tea contains tannins which are a natural tenderizer. Soak meat in 1-2 cups of cooled black tea for up to 24 hours.

Coffee: The acidity in the coffee helps tenderize the meat and adds flavor. Soak beef in cooled coffee for up to 24 hours.

Cola: Like coffee, the acid in cola helps tenderize the meat. It also adds a subtle caramel flavor that is quite nice.

Baking Soda: Baking soda helps break down the meat protein. Just be sure you rinse well to remove all of the baking soda. Bake soda help form a nice crust on steak.

Wine: Contain tannins and acid which are both natural meat tenderizers and will impart some flavor to the beef, so be mindful of that. Soak for at least an hour before cooking.

 
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