Rice + Water + Time

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masteraznchefjr

Sous Chef
Joined
Sep 2, 2004
Messages
785
Location
UCLA
1 part rice - washed +1/2 to the rice part example: 2 part rice add 2 1/2 cups of water. 1 cup or 3/4 cup i think in the steamer
 

Alix

Everymom
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
May 10, 2002
Messages
23,275
Location
Edmonton, Alberta
Zactly like crewsk. We must cook for the same number of people. 2 kids and a husband crewsk?
 

GaArt

Cook
Joined
Sep 9, 2004
Messages
79
Location
USA,Texas
The same proportions, but I bring to a boil, cover, turn on low and simmer for 15 min.. then remove from heat, fluff with fork and let stand another 15 min (don't take off the lid except for the fluffing part)

works every time.
 

scott123

Senior Cook
Joined
Feb 22, 2004
Messages
403
Location
USA,NewJersey
There is no perfect ratio for rice. Over time, rice (and beans) lose moisture, so older rice requires longer cooking/more water to turn out well.

I buy a big bag of rice. The first few times I establish the amount of water it needs and then stick to that ratio for the rest of the bag.

Over the years, I've had bags that worked with 1 cup rice/1.5 cups water and other bags that required 2.5 cups water and everything in between.

Growing conditions
The handling of the grower
The handling of the packager
The handling of the supermarket
The manner in which you store rice
Quantity of rice being cooked
Simmering temperature

These all can impact the ratio of water to rice. If you buy small bags from the same supermarket/same producer and use them quickly, cooking the same quantity each time, there's a small chance you'll be successful using the same ratio of water time after time.

Observing the outcome and adjusting your water accordingly will improve your odds pretty drastically though.
 

Pazzo

Assistant Cook
Joined
Aug 27, 2004
Messages
21
When I lived in Japan for a short while, they made their rice with glutin rice, and with a ratio of almost 1:1.5, with no salt. Salt in Japanese rice is strictly verboten.[/i]
 

Yakuta

Head Chef
Joined
Sep 2, 2004
Messages
1,207
Location
Chicago
I agree with scott that there is no exact formula but there are some (like what Crewsk stated) works well.

I think in general a cup of rice and two cups of water works well. I normally wash my rice multiple times to get rid of the starch. I then place it in a saucepan add two cups of water, pinch of salt and 1 tbsp of butter. I then let it come to a boil and stir it once. Cover and then let it cook on low until done.

I use this technique with long grain rice.
 

JohnL

Head Chef
Joined
Sep 2, 2004
Messages
1,191
Location
USA,Maryland
I also do the two to one ratio, but I like to put a Tbs. of olive oil in the pot, then add chopped onion, garlic, hot chili's,ect... then add the rice, toss till coated, instead of plain salt, I usually add a boullion cube, then water. Bring to a boil, turn the heat to low, cook for 20 mins. let sit for a bit then fluff with a fork.
Always works for me :D
John.
 

puteri

Assistant Cook
Joined
Oct 16, 2004
Messages
12
I found this new method to cook my rice and it works so perfect that I have not used my rice cooker anymore!
For plain white rice: 2 cups of jasmine or any long grain rice, rinse briefly, put in 2 quart le creuset French oven, pour 3 cups of water, 1 tsp of salt, and a little butter(optinal). stir and cover pan. Put pan in oven. Turn on oven to 350F and put timer to 50-55 minutes. Take pot out when timer done and I can assure you that your rice is nicely cooked, no crust or burn rice!
I have also used this method with cooking with basmati rice. You have to wash basmati really well and then follow as above, putting more butter if you like, some dried onion, cloves and stick of cinnamon.
Try this and let me know how it turn out.
 

kitchenelf

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Feb 21, 2002
Messages
19,722
Location
North Carolina
puteri - I do your method with the cloves, onions, and cinnamin when I make my chicken curry. It's a GREAT combination!! Except I also put golden sultans in there too. I caramelize the onions, add the rice and let brown briefly, then proceed.

I also like to (when I do Adobo Chicken - the Filipino version, not the one that calls for Adobo "seasoning") add some fresh thyme sprigs to the cooking rice. It's REALLY good!

I still like to sautee my rice first until it takes on some color - then I finish by cooking in oven or on the stove.
 

marmalady

Executive Chef
Joined
Sep 3, 2004
Messages
2,642
Location
USA,SouthCarolina
Cooking rice in the oven is a GREAT way to get it done when you have to cook large quantities; also frees up space on the stovetop when you're cooking a lot for parties, etc.!
 

goodgiver

Senior Cook
Joined
Sep 3, 2004
Messages
336
Location
USA,Pennsylvania
Rice ratios

That is how I do all my rices. Doing it the plain way it is tasteless. By doing it pour way it does have some flavor. This is for JohnL
 

Darkstream

Senior Cook
Joined
Sep 7, 2004
Messages
287
It entirely depends on the rice you are using.

Real rice varieties vary wildly, some need to be cooked for 1 1/2 hours or more, others are ready in 15 minutes.

You will have to be more specific if you want any advice from me.
 

Darkstream

Senior Cook
Joined
Sep 7, 2004
Messages
287
Red Camargue

Also, brown basmatti or brown unhusked risotto type rices need at least 60 minutes in the oven.

Try it yourself and see.
 

amber

Executive Chef
Joined
Aug 26, 2004
Messages
4,099
Location
USA,Maine
I can cook just about anything, but for some reason rice is one thing I cant do good at all. I've almost always used long-grain white rice. 2cups water, 1 cup rice, bring to a boil, add the rice, cover and turn down the heat to med-low. It either comes out hard, (water boiled off before rice was done), or it comes out mushy after adding more water because the rice was still hard :LOL:
 

Alix

Everymom
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
May 10, 2002
Messages
23,275
Location
Edmonton, Alberta
amber, how long do you cook it? And do you leave the lid on for a bit after you turn off the heat?
 

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