Sugary Honey

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JMediger

Head Chef
Joined
Sep 7, 2005
Messages
1,178
Location
Wisconsin
Hello All,
DH found some amazing honey last time he was in Oregon and bought us 2 jars, one labeled "Carrot Honey" and the other "Meadowfoam". He left them at his parents for about 3 months and now that we are back, I have found the Carrot Honey to be completely solid (sugared) and the Meadowfoam to be half.

I know that I can thin them out for use by simply putting the jar in warm water but after they cool, they will sugar again. I also know the more times you do this, the grainier the honey gets.

So here's my question ... does anyone have a T&T method for thinning honey and keeping it that way?


Thank you!
 

Whiskadoodle

Executive Chef
Joined
Nov 1, 2011
Messages
4,129
Location
Twin Cities Mn
Do not think you can microwave it even though it can be done. That really turns its balance around. Unless you are likely to use it right away. I like just heat however much you will use for whatever shorter period of time and gently heat in a glass cup or jar in some warmer water. It stores fine in its crystalized state.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

Certified/Certifiable
Joined
Aug 26, 2004
Messages
12,430
Location
USA,Michigan
I believe that honey is a super-saturated liquid. That being the case, the solids are easily formed from the liquid. I'm not sure about honey not staying liquified after heating in warm water. For I have placed a glas jar of crystallized honey in hot water, and liquified it. Aterwards, the honey remained liquid for months.

I think the key is similar to keeping simple syrup completely dissolved. Any crystals left in the liquid, that is, not completely dissolved into the liquid, will give the dissolved sugars a "seed" to grow on. When i heated the honey, I got it hot, but not boiling, and stirred it carefully, making sure there was absolutely no honey crystals left over. I poured the liquified honey into a clean jar, and topped with a clean lid. It kept literally for a month with no crystallization.

Hope this helps.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

GotGarlic

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
May 9, 2007
Messages
26,730
Location
Southeastern Virginia
The link I posted says that unfiltered honey will have pollen and other particles in it on which crystals will form. I think just heating the amount you need at one time will solve the problem.
 

JMediger

Head Chef
Joined
Sep 7, 2005
Messages
1,178
Location
Wisconsin
Thank you for your thoughts! Chief, I was hoping I could do like you suggested but with it being unfiltered, GG is right. I can't get all the pollen and minut bee parts out so I think it will just happen again. I'll just heat the amount I need and go from there. It is stored in glass so I'm good there ...

Thank you all!
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

Certified/Certifiable
Joined
Aug 26, 2004
Messages
12,430
Location
USA,Michigan
Thank you for your thoughts! Chief, I was hoping I could do like you suggested but with it being unfiltered, GG is right. I can't get all the pollen and minut bee parts out so I think it will just happen again. I'll just heat the amount I need and go from there. It is stored in glass so I'm good there ...

Thank you all!

I guess I spoke too soon. My honey (local from a bee-keeping friend) has started crystalizing. fortunately (or rather, unfortunately) that jar is almost empty. Good thing next Tuesday is pay-day. I need more honey.:yum:

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

GLC

Head Chef
Joined
Oct 27, 2011
Messages
1,215
Location
Near Austin, Texas
Most true local honey will crystalize long before commercial honey. Commercial honey is both pasturized and heavily filtered. It may, in fact, be microfiltered to make it difficult to determine its national origin by analyzing pollen, the suspects being China and some others who heavily apply fungicides. Honey that remains liquid for an abnormally long time is suspect, both of being of questionable origin and for being adulterated with things other than honey.

One treatment possible is to make it into creamed honey. There are many instructional sites you can find about making creamed honey. You just need purchased cream honey as starter. Because creaming is crystalizing with very fine crystals, your crystalization worries are over.

(The international honey business is about as crooked as the olive oil business.)
 

PrincessFiona60

Ogress Supreme
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Jul 14, 2009
Messages
38,958
Location
Wyoming
The local honey here is sold from warmers to keep it liquid. I buy it a half pint at a time unless I need more for a recipe. It comes from the apiary already partially crystallized. Good stuff.
 

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