Super Ultra THIN crispy pizza crust?

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chueh

Senior Cook
Joined
Feb 9, 2009
Messages
131
My husband and I both LOVE Dominos thin crust pizzas.

I got a pizza stone and used it, yet not happy with the crust.

So.. I bought a pizza STEEL. I love how my thin pizza crust, yet my husband doesn't, for it's not as thin or EASY/Crunchy as Dominos'.

Com'on, a homemade crust!!!! How thin can it be? I already made it so thin when rolling it out. I don't think I could make any thinner.

BUT what he said was true though. Dominos' is much crunchier and so easy to break them up, but mine is kind of HARD...........

So,, what ingredient do I need to get thin crunchy crust? Baking soda added to the dough???? Dominos' thin crust is more like Saltine cracker kind of crispy, but mine is more like regular crackers, if you know what I mean? Maybe I can just use a saltine crackers recipe instead of pizza dough's?

Thanks

Thanks,
 

dcSaute

Sous Chef
Joined
Apr 24, 2011
Messages
915
pizza dough is best flour+water+yeast+smidge salt - I used a blend of semolina + KA bread flour.

olive oil is often used, and oil/fats keep/make the dough soft(er)
if it's thin and too brittle, try additional olive oil.


I use a stone. no probs - but my trick is to heat up the tomato (whatever)* so it goes on the crust hot, then toppings, then immediately into oven.


(whatever)" = = = I don't use pasta or pizza "sauces" as sold in the store. every year I cook down about a bushel of canner tomatoes into a semi-stewed state, freeze in quart bags.

so my 'pizza sauce' is more 'de-watered stewed tomatoes' - it is chunky and incredibly more fresh tasting than store bought ketchup in a big jar.


and, being hot on the crust, helps the pizza cook quicker.
when the pizza on the stone is done, it gets 'cooled' on a rack for 5 minutes. this prevents the 'still baking steam' from converting a crisp crust to a soggy crust.
when I cut it with a big knife, it 'snaps' - but it's not brittle, does not break apart, etc....
 

GinnyPNW

Head Chef
Joined
Aug 20, 2021
Messages
1,922
Location
Somewhere in the PNW
chuech, have you ever had MOD Pizza? If so, what do you think of their crust?

I believe your issue is more about the flour and/or recipe than the stone or steel. I once read that MOD uses King Arthur flour...but it wasn't clear is they use their "Pizza Flour" or their "Pizza Dough Mix". I use 00 flour. But, I like a chewy, thin crust. Not so much the crispy kind?
 

chueh

Senior Cook
Joined
Feb 9, 2009
Messages
131
i gotta try MOD pizza. Never had it before.
Isn't 00 flour making dough more BREADY????
 

GinnyPNW

Head Chef
Joined
Aug 20, 2021
Messages
1,922
Location
Somewhere in the PNW
i gotta try MOD pizza. Never had it before.
Isn't 00 flour making dough more BREADY????

00 Flour is for making the "traditional" Neapolitan pizza. It is our preferred pizza...at least for now! LOL. I/we do appreciate all kinds of pizza. Thin, thick, deep dish, Chicago, New York, Detroit...but what I like to make at home is Neapolitan. I can make it for lunch. Quick, easy, light...and fun! For us. Everyone is different. Experiment and find your personal favorite!

:chef:
 

obillo

Assistant Cook
Joined
Oct 2, 2022
Messages
16
Location
Manhattan
pizza dough is best flour+water+yeast+smidge salt - I used a blend of semolina + KA bread flour.

olive oil is often used, and oil/fats keep/make the dough soft(er)
if it's thin and too brittle, try additional olive oil.


I use a stone. no probs - but my trick is to heat up the tomato (whatever)* so it goes on the crust hot, then toppings, then immediately into oven.


(whatever)" = = = I don't use pasta or pizza "sauces" as sold in the store. every year I cook down about a bushel of canner tomatoes into a semi-stewed state, freeze in quart bags.

so my 'pizza sauce' is more 'de-watered stewed tomatoes' - it is chunky and incredibly more fresh tasting than store bought ketchup in a big jar.


and, being hot on the crust, helps the pizza cook quicker.
when the pizza on the stone is done, it gets 'cooled' on a rack for 5 minutes. this prevents the 'still baking steam' from converting a crisp crust to a soggy crust.
when I cut it with a big knife, it 'snaps' - but it's not brittle, does not break apart, etc....
Hmmm--l'll try that, heating the sauce before applying to the dough. As for de-watering tomatoes:
I line a colander and/or big strainer with large, restaurant-type paper coffee filters: they're about 12" in diameter. I dump tomatoes in and let 'em drain. No cooking needed. Complete/exact control over just how much water is removed. Works w/canned tomatoes too.
 

obillo

Assistant Cook
Joined
Oct 2, 2022
Messages
16
Location
Manhattan
Hmmm--l'll try that, heating the sauce before applying to the dough. As for de-watering tomatoes:
I line a colander and/or big strainer with large, restaurant-type paper coffee filters: they're about 12" in diameter. I dump tomatoes in and let 'em drain. No cooking needed. Complete/exact control over just how much water is removed. Works w/canned tomatoes too.
Hah! I thought I was the only one who used the filter trick. Glad to know there's at least one more. An added trick my wife taught me: buddy up with the produce guys so they'll tip you off when they're going to cull their tomatoes. You want the seriously over-ripe ones the put on desperation sale for a buck a bag. Ripe means sweet. Over-ripe means really sweet.
 
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