The best pancake recipe

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Real Help

Cook
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I might be wrong with the translation. I am talking about that powder that's very smooth, like a very fine powder and not a little bit granulated.
 

Andy M.

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I might be wrong with the translation. I am talking about that powder that's very smooth, like a very fine powder and not a little bit granulated.
Both baking powder and baking soda are very fine powders. Baking powder is often labeled as "Double Acting" and is a combination of baking soda, cream of tartar and cornstarch.
 

Real Help

Cook
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Both baking powder and baking soda are very fine powders. Baking powder is often labeled as "Double Acting" and is a combination of baking soda, cream of tartar and cornstarch.
I just translated wrong; my biological CPU is giving me a hard time. I think I used what you guys call double acting baking powder. Around here they are different. While the double acting baking powder is very fine and smooth like flour, baking soda, is a bit more granulated and not as smooth as baking powder. More like a fine salt I'd say.
 

Cooking Goddess

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There are two secrets to making your pancakes tender and fluffy.
1. Tender - Use buttermilk instead of regular milk or water.
2. Fluffy - Separate the egg(s), mix the yolks in with the batter ingredients, then fold the WHIPPED egg whites into the finished batter.
I do neither of those things and still get fluffy, tender pancakes when using the recipe I shared in my earlier post.
 

dcSaute

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". . . my biological CPU is giving me a hard time."
but on the bright side, it is auto-correcting.

methinks you got it right.
baking soda will have ingredient:
"sodium bicarbonate" perhaps with some mystery "flow agent"

baking powder is more complex - longer list of ingredients.
single acting baking powder is a rare thing today; it's almost all "double acting" i.e. releases CO2 on contact with acid and more CO2 when heated.
 

taxlady

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Both baking powder and baking soda are very fine powders. Baking powder is often labeled as "Double Acting" and is a combination of baking soda, cream of tartar and cornstarch.
It's actually a little more complex than that for double acting baking powder. What you described is single acting baking powder.

 

GotGarlic

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SirLOB - I don't make cakes from scratch for that very reason. I hate separating and whipping and folding in.. I'll just use a cake mix and I'm happy with that. :cool:
Just FYI, there are cake recipes that don't involve separating eggs. You start by creaming butter and sugar together. I prefer that method because I'm not into separating eggs, either.
 

taxlady

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The only time I separate eggs for a cake recipe is when I make sponge cake. I usually only make that to use in trifle, but it is quite nice on its own.
 

cloudela

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New York
You can try make this Perkins Potato Pancakes

Ingredients

  • Two beaten eggs, yolks, and whites
  • Fresh milk
  • One bowl of all-purpose flour
  • Three tablespoons butter
  • Seasoning: pepper and salt to taste (don’t add too much). Herb is okay or not because you will be eating it with sauce or bacon, so it is not necessary.
  • Two cups of mashed potatoes.

Preparation Step

  • Mix dry ingredients (except butter) and eggs.
  • Next, pour the milk into the frothy mixture (the milk needs to be hot to dissolve the ingredients into a paste)
  • Melt the butter in the pan
  • You should add oil and butter each time you pour the cake into the pan before because this step will help the cake not stick to the pan and not dry.
  • Bake for 2-3 minutes until both sides are golden brown.
  • Place the cake on a plate and add other toppings according to your preference.
I have been making this pancake for a long time and the taste is wonderful.
 

Real Help

Cook
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Now I'm on a mission. I will try everything you guys said to test them all out. I have no problem separating the eggs, I will try the buttermilk version and the sour cream too. Omw to unlock a new achievement. My poor husband will have to eat a lot of pancakes, I'm sure he will feel so punished.
 

cloudela

Assistant Cook
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Jan 30, 2023
Messages
10
Location
New York
Now I'm on a mission. I will try everything you guys said to test them all out. I have no problem separating the eggs, I will try the buttermilk version and the sour cream too. Omw to unlock a new achievement. My poor husband will have to eat a lot of pancakes, I'm sure he will feel so punished.
You can try to find other recipes from some good food websites like bordforden, taste, food network...
 

Aunt Bea

Master Chef
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near Mount Pilot
Pancakes for breakfast! ?

I mixed up a 1/2 cup of flour, 1/4t salt, 1 t baking powder, and 1/2t sugar. I added an egg, 2T melted bacon fat, 1/2 cup of corn with a couple tablespoons of the packing liquid and a glug of milk to thin the thick batter.

I greased the pan with bacon fat and made three 5”-6” cakes.

I had them with sugar free maple flavored pancake syrup but it started me thinking about savory pancakes.

I think the corn and a green onion added to the batter would be nice served with salsa and sour cream or a cream sauce with peas, mushrooms, tuna, etc…
 

blissful

Master Chef
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Mar 25, 2008
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In another thread @dragnlaw mentioned making pancakes for the freezer.

I’m curious to know if any of you have TNT
tips and hints for refrigerating or freezing and thawing pancakes that you could share.

I’m not really interested in large batch or long term storage but a cook once eat twice plan would be worth considering.

My current plan is to cook once and eat twice as many as I should! ?
We eat refined oil free, so I bake my pancakes on parchment in the oven. I keep them in a bag in the fridge, then I slice them into sticks to have with triple berry puree/jam. These were apple peach pancakes. Hot or cold.
applepeachpancakes-001.jpg
 

taxlady

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near Montreal, Quebec
There are also Danish savoury pancakes. Make the pancakes with no sugar or other sweetener. Roll the pancakes up with some sort of meaty or veggie filling. Put them in an ovenproof pan or dish. Sprinkle grated cheese on top. Bake or broil until the cheese is melted and starting to brown.
 

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