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VeraBlue

Executive Chef
Joined
Jul 10, 2006
Messages
3,683
Location
northern NJ
Interesting ideas, but unfortunately it's not fig season. Plus, we didn't have any in the restaurant even if there was.

Grits would be interesting, although I'd have to ask the chef to order that since we don't have any on hand either.
Not fig season?? I've been buying the most beautiful figs for the past three weeks.. This may be the last harrah for them, but they most certainly are available here in NYC/NJ/Philly.

What type of cuisine does the house spec in?
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

Certified/Certifiable
Joined
Aug 26, 2004
Messages
12,454
Location
USA,Michigan
I would try the foam as I'm an adventurous kind-of guy. But to me, it does resemble the foam on blades of grass that we used to call snake-spit when I was a kid running through fields. I would just have to look at it as a lighter version of marangue.

I think what everyone is afraid of is the wet, somewhat slimey texture of moth foams. They forget about the wonderful foams atop freshly poured, carbonated beverages, and the wonderful taste that a foam can bring to the table, such as that on a root beer float.

Foams don't have to be slimey and overly wet. They can be quite nice.

IC; Maybe you can post for us a method for making a flavored foam.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
 

ironchef

Executive Chef
Joined
May 11, 2003
Messages
3,557
Location
The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Not fig season?? I've been buying the most beautiful figs for the past three weeks.. This may be the last harrah for them, but they most certainly are available here in NYC/NJ/Philly.

What type of cuisine does the house spec in?

They're not available here locally as far as I know. We'd have to bring them in from California.

The restaurant is a combination of Pacific Rim and Contemporary cuisines.
 

Martha

Assistant Cook
Joined
Dec 4, 2006
Messages
18
Foam in food. Difficult concept for me. Too many memories of dying doggies, people with epilipsy, post baby droll and bubbles. Just can't deal with foam. But appreciate the creativity.
 

GotGarlic

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
May 9, 2007
Messages
27,400
Location
Southeastern Virginia
Foam in food. Difficult concept for me. Too many memories of dying doggies, people with epilipsy, post baby droll and bubbles. Just can't deal with foam. But appreciate the creativity.

Thanks for those images :( Maybe next time you could just express the appreciation.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

Certified/Certifiable
Joined
Aug 26, 2004
Messages
12,454
Location
USA,Michigan
Thanks for those images :( Maybe next time you could just express the appreciation.

I still say that sucking the foam off of a good ice cream float is a great summertime activity. And don't forget that baked foam - marangue. And if you want to stretch the idea just a bit, think of the nougat inside Mars candy bars.

I have seen the insides of fish and game that I have had to clean. It doesn't turn me away from eating the meat. I could go on, but don't want to upset anyone's sensitivities. That's not my goal here.

I believe that one should be able to seperate reality from suggestive experiences. Foam is just a bunch of bubles, usually found floating atop liquids. They come from many sources, anything that can create enough surface tension on the liquid to trap air. A buttery roux foams as it cooks, before the liquid is added to make a sauce. I've seen foam on top of hot cooking oil as well. And an orange julius just wouldn't seem right without a bit of foam floating on top. Whipped cream is a kind of foam as well.

IC, I still would like a technique for making a good foam to use as an enhancement to savory or sweet foods.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
 

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