Tips for Steak well done in Sous Vide

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GotGarlic

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Hmm, maybe. I just like the idea that I can set it up before I go to work and schedule the cook for any time. Then if maybe I am running late or coming home early I can just log in to the device with the app on my phone and start the cook or delay it if I have to.

I also like the reminders. "Your steak is done!" and so on.

It's like a crockpot on steroids and with a brain. So cool.

Sounds a little risky to me.

Do I Need A Sous Vide Machine With WiFi? - Amazing Food Made Easy
Most safety recommendations suggest food shouldn't be in the danger zone [40-140°] for more than 2 to 4 hours all together. Since the majority of sous vide machines take between 45 and 60 minutes to heat from 40°F (4.4°C) to at least 130°F you don't have too much leeway, especially once you factor in the time the food was in the danger zone during shopping.

Consequently, it's important that the water bath be at a temperature lower than 40°F (4.4°C) when the food is placed in it. Moreover, it's critical that the sous vide machine begins cooking once the water temperature warms up to 40°F (4.4°C) at the latest. The best way to do this with a traditional sous vide machine is to put "enough" ice in the water bath to maintain the low temperature until the desired starting time.

Ice
You might wonder, "Just how much is 'enough' ice?" I am in the process of doing some experimentation to determine that and it will be included in a future post. However, my initial testing would indicate that you need a 50% ice to 50% water ratio in order to maintain the temperature under 40°F (4.4°C) for around 6-8 hours.
 
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The Anova in particular will automatically start cooking your food if it detects that the temperature is getting too close to the danger zone. All you need to do is dump more than enough ice into the bath to keep it cool while you are away.

I'll have to check out how long it takes to heat up.
 

GotGarlic

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The Anova in particular will automatically start cooking your food if it detects that the temperature is getting too close to the danger zone. All you need to do is dump more than enough ice into the bath to keep it cool while you are away.

I'll have to check out how long it takes to heat up.

It really seems like it's way more trouble than it's worth.
 

RPCookin

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GotGarlic

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Wait wait...Have you ever had anything prepared Sous Vide GotGarlic and RPCookin?

I don't want to assume anything here.

Not that I'm aware of, but I understand some restaurants use that technique, so it's possible. I've seen rapturous descriptions of the results of sous vide cooking, but I'm not one of those people who has to produce the ultimate X in my own kitchen. Given the price of the machine and the time investment required, imo, it's not worth it.

Your mileage may vary, of course :)
 

RPCookin

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Wait wait...Have you ever had anything prepared Sous Vide GotGarlic and RPCookin?

I don't want to assume anything here.

I'm with GG. It's not worth the cost and hassle and time. I can grill a steak to my medium rare liking in about 8 minutes, with no need for 2 more appliances which I don't have room for anyway.
 

Cheryl J

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Same here - I don't have room to store any extra equipment (or the patience for sous vide), although I've heard great things about it, too.

For me, I'd rather stick with what I've been doing for 30 years and throw a nice rib eye on the grill, sear it, plate it at rare to med rare, let it rest a few, and chow down. From grill to plate in 10 minutes or so, depending on the thickness. :yum:


haha Rick....we were posting at the same time. :)
 
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roadfix

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Just an interesting side note as I was Googling to find out how popular SV was today among restaurants here in the US. Well, I just read that Amtrak has been using SV in their long distance dining cars since 1995. Very cool...
 
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Not that I'm aware of, but I understand some restaurants use that technique, so it's possible. I've seen rapturous descriptions of the results of sous vide cooking, but I'm not one of those people who has to produce the ultimate X in my own kitchen. Given the price of the machine and the time investment required, imo, it's not worth it.

Your mileage may vary, of course :)

GG, you are one of my favorite posters. Elegantly said, and fair enough for certain. It is likely that you have had it, but it's just not to your taste to have such a device for yourself at home. I see nothing wrong with that.

For my friends who are skeptical of the method, I offer to cook for them. They don't stay skeptics hehe

roadfix> I heard about that too. I never would have thought that a train company would do it, and that they would be doing it before most...but there you have it.
 

NAchef

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I like doing veggies in the SV. Carrots, corn, etc. Always come out better than other methods I've used.
 

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