What kind of honey is good for cooking and do the properties maintain?

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anitasharp5

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From grilling to roasting, can honey be used with just about any cooking method, and can it be used in recipes served either hot or cold? and do the honey properties maintain while being cooked?
 

taxlady

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If you are hoping for any health benefits from enzymes, they will likely be deactivated by cooking.

And, as dragn said, it does burn, like sugar. It's why I only add honey when I'm making granola after I take it out of the oven.
 

JohnDB

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I like honey...like a LOT.

I have a "collection" and samples of various honeys from everywhere.

Sourwood, Tupelo, and many others.

The problem is that currently there is a shortage. Most honeys are adulterated in some fashion. Bee keepers are putting out some form of sugar or syrup near their bee hives to increase the production of honey by their bees which then lowers the flavor level of the honey.
Tupelo honey is one of the best of the best....also the most expensive too. But it often is diluted. Rich buttery flavors along side of flowery, perfume is harder and harder to detect anymore.

Sourwood is a unique flavored honey...like orange blossom. It, like sourdough bread, has a distinct sour flavor. It isn't often that you find this honey in its pure state, unadulterated by Rice syrup or something. But it is awesome when you do.

The "off the shelf" honey that we buy in the grocery store is blended from many sources before bottling. The flavor is gone in it. Natural, raw, and unadulterated honey is NOT something that children should be given as it contains botulism...you will paralyze them and possibly kill them.
I remember when opening a jar or bucket of honey would make it stink in the kitchen because it was so strong....doesn't happen anymore. And where it's a nice addition to a flavor profile for breads, cakes, and frostings....it's too light flavored and expensive to use anymore.
 

taxlady

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From Wikipedia,
Infant botulism (also referred to as floppy baby syndrome) was first recognized in 1976, and is the most common form of botulism in the United States. Infants are susceptible to infant botulism in the first year of life, with more than 90% of cases occurring in infants younger than six months.[3] Infant botulism results from the ingestion of the C. botulinum spores, and subsequent colonization of the small intestine. The infant gut may be colonized when the composition of the intestinal microflora (normal flora) is insufficient to competitively inhibit the growth of C. botulinum and levels of bile acids (which normally inhibit clostridial growth) are lower than later in life.
No need to panic about honey with older children.
 

JohnDB

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From Wikipedia,

No need to panic about honey with older children.
Yeah....but I'll still give the kids a Hershey bar while I eat the good chocolate from Belgium....they are just as happy and don't know the difference anyway.
Same thing with honey....give them Great Value or Kroger honey out of the bear while I get Tupelo or Sourwood....can't be too careful eh?
 

GotGarlic

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Yeah....but I'll still give the kids a Hershey bar while I eat the good chocolate from Belgium....they are just as happy and don't know the difference anyway.
Same thing with honey....give them Great Value or Kroger honey out of the bear while I get Tupelo or Sourwood....can't be too careful eh?
On the other hand, you could take the opportunity to teach the children about the differences between good quality and lesser quality foods.
 

JohnDB

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On the other hand, you could take the opportunity to teach the children about the differences between good quality and lesser quality foods.
Of course....when teaching my son and nieces I have....complete with side by side comparisons and tastings so they completely understand the difference and costs involved. Why and when to use expensive ingredients and when it doesn't matter because nobody will be able to taste the difference.

There's a time and place for that.

Most children though are just eating and not savoring every bite type dining like adults do. I've seen plenty of 5 year olds more happy with a few oreos when dried cherry, white chocolate chip cookies are being served.

Tastes change and mature as we age. Children's tastes aren't fully matured and developed yet....just like our sensitivity to sugars wanes as we age...and because most foods contain some sugars nothing seems to taste right at a certain point in the "golden years" .
 

taxlady

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It also depends on the kid. I remember being insulted when adults wanted to give me the "child friendly" versions of foods, like glazed carrots. :sick: or sweet potatoes with marshmallow sauce :sick: :sick: and I liked carrots. I don't remember ever liking Oreos. I remember pulling them apart and licking off that very sweet white filling. Oh, and I just remembered. We didn't usually tell adults about candy or cookies that we didn't think were up to par. Experience taught us that was likely to simply stop them from giving us candy or cookies at all. Any sweets were welcome, even if it wasn't the ones we preferred.
 
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