What Spices Do You Hate?

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Sir_Loin_of_Beef

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This is actually an herb, but I can't stand tarragon.

It's not that I don't like it, but ingesting just a very small amount makes me itch all over for about 15 minutes.

itch1.jpg
 

pepperhead212

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I'm surprised at how many people dislike tarragon - I love it...
If somebody doesn't like the anise/licorice flavor, they won't like tarragon - simple as that.

I also like tarragon - so much, that I also tried growing it inside, many years ago, during the off-season (it's a perennial, and dies off, but pops up early every spring). Cuttings rooted well, but it attracted spider mites, so that got tossed. However, years later I started growing something that I now use in place of tarragon in many dishes, that I now have 365 days a year: Thai basil - another herb with a strong anise flavor, but more complex than tarragon. Even less is needed, and a friend, who's favorite dish used to be tarragon chicken, changed that to Thai basil chicken. Plus, she talked about learning how to grow it, though she never did.
 
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Kayelle

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I'm surprised at how many people dislike tarragon - I love it, especially used in this:


it's THE ESSENTIAL HERB used in the long time-honored French recipe for the delicious Cognac Cream Sauce drizzled over med.-rare tenderloin beef steak, which includes:


Shallots,
Heavy Cream
Dijon Mustard
Tarragon
Cognac
Cracked Black Pepper


I often make this over 200 year old French sauce recipe that my grandmother introduced me to, for making filet mignon the superb dish it can be.
Paul, that sounds good except for the tarragon.;) The first time I ever tasted Béarnaise sauce as a young adult, I couldn't eat it. As you know, tarragon is essential in a Bearnaise, and that was the end of tarragon for me. Many many moons later, I still can't stand it, and the good news is I don't need it. ;)


If somebody doesn't like the anise/licorice flavor, they won't like tarragon - simple as that.


True true....
 
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WhateverYouWant

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As you know, tarragon is essential in a Bearnaise

Kayelle... I use basil, Italian parsley, or even cilantro (whatever I have on hand, with basil preferred), and no one has ever complained (or worse yet exclaimed "this is not bearnaise!").
 

Kayelle

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Kayelle... I use basil, Italian parsley, or even cilantro (whatever I have on hand, with basil preferred), and no one has ever complained (or worse yet exclaimed "this is not bearnaise!").


Good ideas Scott. :chef: We enjoy bacon wrapped pan fried Fillet Mignon pretty often and next time I just may make a "mock" classic Béarnaise sauce with basil.
 

taxlady

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Tarragon is not a favourite of mine, but when I make green goddess dressing, it has to have tarragon vinegar. I am one of those who dislikes licorice type flavours, but they tend to be okay in small quantities, especially when balanced well.
 

GotGarlic

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Kayelle... I use basil, Italian parsley, or even cilantro (whatever I have on hand, with basil preferred), and no one has ever complained (or worse yet exclaimed "this is not bearnaise!").
The fact that your guests don't know that béarnaise includes tarragon doesn't mean it's not the traditional flavor for that sauce. The specific names of French sauces have those names for a reason.
 

Recipes Make Magic

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Paul, that sounds good except for the tarragon.;) The first time I ever tasted Béarnaise sauce as a young adult, I couldn't eat it. As you know, tarragon is essential in a Bearnaise, and that was the end of tarragon for me. Many many moons later, I still can't stand it, and the good news is I don't need it. ;)





True true....


Try this sauce on filet with another herb that you like, Kay - I'm quite sure it would be tasty with thyme instead of tarragon, for example.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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on steak, I prefer a compound butter to a Bearnaise Sauce. With a comound butter, you can use any herbs and spices you like, even grated hard cheeses mix well with the butter. I like Tarragon in my tartar sauce, to go with battered, or breaded fish, especially bland fish such as cod. It gives much needed flavor. With stronger flavored fish, such as some of the salmon family, I like lemon, salt and pepper. For fishy tasting fish, like pike, the vinegar cuts the strong,fish flavor. Of course, if cooked to a crispy skin, the extra fish flavor will go away as well. Fish skin cracklings are really quite tasty. The skins can also be removed and poached, or boiled to make fish srock.

Hollandaise sauce is a mother sauce that is the basefor Bernaise, and other daughter sauces. The Hollandaise is made from egg yolks, lenon juice, and butter. According to this - https://www.finedininglovers.com/article/mother-and-daughter-extended-family-sauces, and I quote, "Bearnaise sauce includes vinegar, shallots, tarragon and chervil. Choron sauce is Bearnaise minus tarragon and chervil, but with added pureed tomato. stock. " It realy isn't Bermaise Sauce wothout the tarragon. But hey, create your own daughter sauce. Just don't call it Bernaise Sauce. There are other, similar sauces as well that just might taste great on your Follet Mignon Tournedoes. In place of Benaise, use a compound butter mixed with truffle salt, and black pepper, or dried and ground porcini (King Bolete) mushroom. You can also top with a portabella cap, or with a good lilver pate' and s mudhtoom grilled mushroom cap to make a mock Tournedos Rossini. The original tops the tournedos with foie gras, and truffle.

There are so many great preperations for fillet mignon. I personall don't use this cut as it has so little flavor. I can cut tournedos from the sirloin, and have a richer beef flavor. Top this with Chasseur sauce for a great dining experience.

Just a few more ideas to use with your Fillet.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

Andy M.

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Curry isn't just one thing. It's a variety dishes that are made up of different combinations of spices and ingredients. It's like saying you don't like soup.
 

taxlady

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Curry isn't just one thing. It's a variety dishes that are made up of different combinations of spices and ingredients. It's like saying you don't like soup.

I think they are referring to that yellow powder in the spice section, labelled "curry". That's the stuff that used to make me nauseous, because of the stale fenugreek. I don't know that it's any better now, because I don't buy it. I just know that when people have served me something with that powder in it in the past few years, it hasn't had that disgusting smell and it hasn't made me nauseous.
 

pepperhead212

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The thing I used to hate about commercial curry powders was that some cheap ones had a very strong flavor from the celery seed, and I assume they used that as a cheap filler. And there were some with garlic and onion powder in them, as well, which also get old fast, like the fenugreek.
 
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Kayelle

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Most, if not all, commercial curry powders contain Cardamon, and that's what started the conversation. Cardamon is commonly used in Indian Curry dishes, and so I would have to agree with GA Home Cook, that if a Curry dish contains Cardamon it's "despicable" imho.
 

Linda0818

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I'm surprised at how many people dislike tarragon - I love it, especially used in this:


it's THE ESSENTIAL HERB used in the long time-honored French recipe for the delicious Cognac Cream Sauce drizzled over med.-rare tenderloin beef steak, which includes:


Shallots,
Heavy Cream
Dijon Mustard
Tarragon
Cognac
Cracked Black Pepper


I often make this over 200 year old French sauce recipe that my grandmother introduced me to, for making filet mignon the superb dish it can be.

I love Tarragon. But a little bit goes a long way, so I use it sparingly.

If somebody doesn't like the anise/licorice flavor, they won't like tarragon - simple as that.

I also like tarragon - so much, that I also tried growing it inside, many years ago, during the off-season (it's a perennial, and dies off, but pops up early every spring). Cuttings rooted well, but it attracted spider mites, so that got tossed. However, years later I started growing something that I now use in place of tarragon in many dishes, that I now have 365 days a year: Thai basil - another herb with a strong anise flavor, but more complex than tarragon. Even less is needed, and a friend, who's favorite dish used to be tarragon chicken, changed that to Thai basil chicken. Plus, she talked about learning how to grow it, though she never did.

Oddly enough, I can't stand anise or black licorice. But I still love Tarragon. However, as I stated above, I use very little at a time.

My most hated spice is curry. Can't stand anything curry. Vile stuff.
 

cookieee

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908
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Tarragon is not a favourite of mine, but when I make green goddess dressing, it has to have tarragon vinegar. I am one of those who dislikes licorice type flavours, but they tend to be okay in small quantities, especially when balanced well.

Hi taxlady, I have been going through my shrimp binders lately and getting rid of recipes that I know I will never want to eat. One of the ingredient in a recipe that I have been throwing away is tarragon vinegar. Do you think I should give it a try? Do you think it would go good with shrimp? I know I could probably use any vinegar but.....
 
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