Who juices (vegetables)?

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MostlyWater

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I gave away a juicer years ago since it was hard to clean; I am toying with the idea of juicing veggies as I know it's healthy; however haven't drunk juiced beets or spinach and am really a beginner here. (I have juiced carrots, though and liked it.)

So - what juicer do you like,and how easy is it to keep clean? Thanks !
 

mcnerd

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I use a juicer and love it, but it is a pain to clean, as they all are. Its the price I pay for being healthy. If you are truly serious about juicing then you get a masticating one or even a steamer, but they are expensive.
 

larry_stewart

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We had a juicer many years ago, and ditched it for the same reason you did. Not sure if the technology has improved and they made them easier to keep clean. The only thing i juice now is apples. I bought myself and old fashioned apple cider press, which is even more of a pain in the butt to clean than the juicer. But, its the type of thing we use once or twice a year after going apple picking, so its more of a novelty than anything else/
 

ChefJune

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Imho, juicing is such a good idea, and so good for the body that the benefits far outweigh the difficulty of cleaning. Besides, if you clean it right away, it really takes very little time. Just don't let the detritus dry inside the juicer.

I regularly juice equal parts of carrot, celery, parsley and spinach. I cannot imagine drinking spinach juice alone (very bitter) or carrot juice alone (faaar too sweet for me). However, this combination is really good as a general juice, and it tastes good (altho it's a weird color). That is to say, you are not juicing to rid yourself of a specific ailment.

Important to note that good juicers are expensive. Those little Juiceman Jr's are not worth the material they're made of.
 

CharlieD

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I have Breville juicer, that I bought few years ago. There might be better ones on the market now. Though I never really juiced vegies, only carrots, mix with apple juice it is awesome. Unfortunately here in MN, everything is so dry, it takes a whole case of apples to make a half decent amount of juice.

June, what kind of juicer do you have/use?
 

gadzooks

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I juice organic veggies, have for years. It came in more than handy about five years ago, when I was diagnosed with Hepatitis C. I went to the VA for treatment, but didn't know just when it would start, so I did what I know how to do. Got the Champion fired up, and went on a diet of vegetable juice. About a pint and a half a day of carrot, red beet with greens, celery, cilantro, spinach, ginger root. I started treatment two weeks after assessment, but continued my juice fast for a total of about two and a half months, along with smoothies made of banana, pineapple or papaya juice, raw organic coconut oil, hemp protein powder, crushed ginger and ice. My doctors and I credit this supplemental diet as a large part of my successful treatment, and it tasted good. I eat solid food, now, but still enjoy juicing often. During that treatment, btw, I wore out a Champion juicer (it was old), and had to replace the armature and bearings...much cheaper than a whole new machine, and easy if you're handy. The Champion takes about five minutes to clean, no matter how much juice you make, not a big deal. Might add that the pulp makes an excellent fiber supplement for batter breads and even soups.
 

ChefJune

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I have an Omega, but I realize that is not the best type. The centrifugal motion creates too much heat for maximum nutrition. However, right now it's what I've got. The Champion is much better, and my doc recommended another brand I can't think of the name right now, but used, on e-bay, it costs $3K! (waaaay out of my ballpark :wacko:).

Might add that the pulp makes an excellent fiber supplement for batter breads and even soups.
Wow. I never thought of that, but I'll bet you're right. Is there any flavor left in that pulp, though?
 

gadzooks

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another brand I can't think of the name right now, but used, on e-bay, it costs $3K! (waaaay out of my ballpark :wacko:).

Ummm...that would probably be a Norwalk. The pulp from those is like sawdust. The pulp from the Champion retains enough flavor to be tasty as an ingredient. Carrots? Make a healthy, fiber-rich carrot cake!
 

MostlyWater

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I saw 2 juices at Bed bath beond; they were hundreds of dollars. Oh, welllllllllll
 

mcnerd

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Mine is a $35 one from Wal-Mart, Black & Decker I believe, and has been used regularly for a couple years. Not the best, but it does the job well and leaves me with a dry pulp and good juice. Juice has to be consumed within hours however.

It is those expensive ones that use different extraction methods that allows the juice to be stored for longer period without losing their nutritional value.
 

g8g8

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Jul 8, 2010
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I use Breville 800JEXL.I can make a liter of juice in about a minute. The large chute means I can toss everything in whole and with the 1000 Watt motor this can juice a bag of carrots, several apples and an entire stalk of lettuce put in whole in seconds with the shredder spinning at 13,000 rpm. I bought this for home and it would be fantastic for a health food restaurant of juice bar. For the fantastic quality and rugged construction you are get far more for your money than any other juicer on the market. It's worth a lot more than I paid for it and this juicer deserves more than 5 stars (far far superior to my top of the line all stainless ACME juicer). I make juice every morning and there is nothing so easy and fast to use.
 

mcnerd

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I do beets all the time, but they are potent to your system. Beets must be peeled before juicing. They will also permanently stain your juicer, so don't try to remove that color by washing.

And, if you use more than 1-2 small beets, you will be reminded later when you go to the bathroom. :angel:
 

gadzooks

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The mix I juiced when I went through treatment for hepatitis c included beets, beet greens and fresh ginger root, among other veggies. I washed the beets but didn't peel anything. Used a Champion juicer. Worked just fine.
 

Phaedra

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I've only just joined this Forum hence the delay in responding to this thread.

Regarding pulp residue - fruit residue can be added to cakes, muffins, or any desert where you use cooked fruit. I like cold fruit soups in the summer and add the residue from juicing fruit in those. I've even added it to fruit sorbets and smoothies, for extra fibre/bulk.

Vegetable residue can be added to soups, stews, casseroles, and suchlike.

Regarding washing juicers - I always put a bowl of hot water in the sink when I'm juicing, and as soon as the juice is made I dismantle the juicer and put it straight in the bowl of water.

That way nothing gets caked on and cleaning is a breeze.
 
Joined
Jun 16, 2011
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I use a vita-mix. Love it since you don't waste so much produce. Please using nearly all of the fruit or vegetable also means you get more fiber. I have tried many other juicers and don't like the clean up or produce waste.

Robert
 
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