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Old 02-24-2006, 12:10 PM   #11
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Whoa, you guys really have a feast for the breakfast!! It surely will give you a kick for the day better than any Wheaties!!

Sorry if I go off the track for a moment... You just awaken my old memories from some years ago, at some Phillipino community fair they had this treat, looked and tasted very much like slim eggrolls (or spring rolls)...forgive me if I am wrong I think they were called something like "loomphie" or "lumfy"... they were absolutely delicious... does anyone, Anau or Chopstix, know what I am talking about? If you do, is there any recipe available? TIA!!
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Old 02-24-2006, 12:54 PM   #12
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Philippines....I never went there, but I must do....I want your breakfast!!!! I was in Bangkok for a few days, but just for job, and they brought me always in a japanese restourant...very good, indeed, but I'd have preferred a lot to eat on the roads...
Interesting, in every way....It seems to me that anglosaxon culture is less interested in food than the others, don't you think so? Or so this appears from your answers.
For Haggis: also in Italy a lot of workers are not able to come back home for lunch, and this is the reason for which I was speaking of "tradition". In every way, even so, a lot of us try to eat something different from a sandwich (if it's possible). A lot of... bars (correct?) offers a big variety of warm and cold dishes, that we usually assume at table. Moreover, really many restautants, even important, have a "business lunch" only at noon, for a easy cost (from 8 to 12 Euro -10-15 USD about) ALL always composed by a first dish (pasta or similar) second dish (meat and vegetables) bread, coffee, 1/4 wine or mineral water, in a reasonable choice. If you think that in a bar a beer is 3 euro, a sandwich 3,5, and a coffee 80 cents.....At least in Milano.
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Old 02-24-2006, 01:03 PM   #13
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I hardly think that your comments re AngloSaxons being less interested in food can be levelled at this group - or they wouldn't post.

I think that you have is the difference between the working practices of various parts of the world. Northern Europeans traditionally do not like to 'split' their working day by spending two hours or more EVERY day eating... We do not have the tradition of taking siestas. We are also conscious that eating large lunches can often make one 'sleepy' during the afternoon, hence the enviable tradition for southern Europeans of sleeping it off for an hour or so... would that our working days allowed this.
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Old 02-24-2006, 01:28 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
I hardly think that your comments re AngloSaxons being less interested in food can be levelled at this group - or they wouldn't post.

I think that you have is the difference between the working practices of various parts of the world. Northern Europeans traditionally do not like to 'split' their working day by spending two hours or more EVERY day eating... We do not have the tradition of taking siestas. We are also conscious that eating large lunches can often make one 'sleepy' during the afternoon, hence the enviable tradition for southern Europeans of sleeping it off for an hour or so... would that our working days allowed this.
I'm really sorry if something I've said has been interpreted as something AGAINST some other: if it was so, please, accept my excuses.I only mean that "from your answers" it seemed a different (different, not bad or worse) interest in food. As I was sure to have explained, I'm trying to "understand" the differences and "to learn" them. In doing this, I try to ask, and, in the same way, I try to listen. So, sorry again.
For example, is interesting in the same way what you think about siesta, two hours eating, or the sleeping time of an hour. It's only a curiosity, please, be sure that there is no polemical intent in this... From where this convintion arrives? A lot of times I heard similar things, and I had never understood why. I meant that working times are a thing, and "tradition" is another. Of course, if you are working far from your home, is impossible that you can come back. In the same way, if you are a single, is difficult that every day you cook for yourself only, a complete meal.
And, at the end, I asked YOU my question just because this is a forum of people interested in food. Otherwise, be sure I would not have been here ( all the times I use complex gramatical forms, I'm in fear that you all are laughing as crazy people.... )
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Old 02-24-2006, 03:17 PM   #15
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I hardly think that your comments re AngloSaxons being less interested in food can be levelled at this group - or they wouldn't post.
I don't think 'interested' was the word RDG was looking for, perhaps 'orientated' would be the more suitable word. I can see where he is coming from. We love to eat, but as a whole the cultures of Australia, America and the UK have a different (and perhaps, dare I say, not as good) view of both food and eating.

I think that the fact that a large majority of the population still eats or drinks at McDonalds/Pizza Hut/Burger King/Starbucks etc etc provides probably the biggest benchmark.

Or it could be that you walk down a supermarket isle (or into the average home's pantry) and you will most likely find an abundance of pre-packaged or pre-processed meals or meal aides. Especially for things which really need no pre-preparation. Now, I'm not talking about spice mixes, stock, tinned tomatoes or spice pastes, but entire meals (or side dishes) that come out of a foil packet with the exception of perhaps the key ingredient.

Another key point which I have thought of is the act of shopping. Can those from different cultures other than UK/US/Australia (such as RDG, Chopstix etc) answer a question for me? When you go shopping for fruit and vegetables, is everything labeled what it is? (I am not talking Asian vegetables being labeled in Italy, but local produce being labeled e.g. a vegetable seller in Italy labelling a zucchini as 'zucchini') I hope I have made the question clear, I'm interested in the reply.

Quote:
The Chinese (from the southern part of China) traditionally have rice at every meal. For breakfast however, it's usually in the form of porridge, with side dishes of pickled vegetables, fermented bean curd, peanuts.
Is that (the porridge) congee? I have been meaning to try it someday, it looks delicious.
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Old 02-24-2006, 03:20 PM   #16
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You may want to take a poll on here of about how many eat at Mickey D's. I haven't been there in ages.
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Old 02-24-2006, 04:00 PM   #17
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well said haggis.

i wish we could all take it easy on those of us with limited knowledge of others language, and history, and the policies of the website herein.
many times i could have jumped in to correct, quite rudely it would have been, the spelling, grammar, and overall knowledge of the things that have been posted (as often as mine is flawed). but then i wouldn't be much of a helpful and friendly member, but rather a jerk who showed up just to be righteous and to prove to myself what i already know.

ish, unless you can trace your heritage to germany prior to 400 a.d. or your family is strictly from wessex, i don't understand why you would take umbrage to a mention of the anglo saxons. i mean, yes, they helped discard pervading/invading roman culture, replacing it with a germanic language that eventually became english, they slowly were changed by scandinavian influences until around 1066, and then by more scandinavian influences after the normans.
us scandinavians are some sneaky folks...

and if you go back far enough, we're all from pangea.

and don't worry rdg, ishbel is purely scot. proud in the face of my western culture's ignorance over many things scottish, so a rebellion here and there is to be expected. it's just the blue and white face paint and men wearing skirts that freaks us out.

ish, pm me to tell me to bugger off...
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Old 02-24-2006, 04:15 PM   #18
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I really dont know anything about traditional eating habits here in America. I think it typically depends on what area of the country one is from. I eat three meals per day....breakfast, lunch, dinner. I make home made food, meaning I do not often get take out fast foods.

I really just cook/eat whatever we are in the mood to eat. Our biggest meal is dinner (between 6-8pm), which usually consists of a meat (beef, chicken, pork), a starch such as potatoes or rice, and a vegetable. I love seafood so I make that alot, and love pasta with marinara sauce, garlic bread, and salad.
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Old 02-24-2006, 05:08 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urmaniac13
Whoa, you guys really have a feast for the breakfast!! It surely will give you a kick for the day better than any Wheaties!!

Sorry if I go off the track for a moment... You just awaken my old memories from some years ago, at some Phillipino community fair they had this treat, looked and tasted very much like slim eggrolls (or spring rolls)...forgive me if I am wrong I think they were called something like "loomphie" or "lumfy"... they were absolutely delicious... does anyone, Anau or Chopstix, know what I am talking about? If you do, is there any recipe available? TIA!!
The people who served us that breakfast are retired and have a really good cook so they tend to eat a lot!

I think your thinking of "lumpia". I actually don't eat a lot of lumpia so I'm not sure what all is in it.
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Old 02-24-2006, 05:30 PM   #20
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Haggis
I have only ever been in MCdonalds TWICE in my lifetime. Frankly, the first time was enough, but I went again with a friend and our children. My daughter refused to eat the food. She was 6 or so - we've never been back!

Buckytom
I'm not taking umbrage about being called an AngloSaxon - merely at the blanket assumption that those of us of Northern European background (whether Saxon, Celt, Briton, Viking or Goth) have little interest in food. I refute that.... our foods have been taken all over the world by our emigrants...

RDG - I have lived and travelled in Southern Europe since the 50s. I can only speak from personal experience. In Malta, for instance. Shops close shortly after 12 noon and then open again at 4 until 8.00 pm. In the UK, traditionally businesses open at 9.00 am and have 50 minutes or one hour for lunch and then finish at 5.00 or 5.30 or even 6.00 pm.

I'm not saying that OUR way is right and others' ways are wrong - just different.
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