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Old 03-10-2005, 03:25 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by -DEADLY SUSHI-
RonJohn its too bad youre 7 hours away. I would be there in ASAP if ya lived closer! Homemade Guiness!!!!!!! YESSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!
You're in Chicago right? That's only about 4 hours! (Hmm.. maybe I should add that to the admissions list in the Road Trip thread...)

7 Hours and I'd be in Juneau, WI :p

John
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Old 03-10-2005, 04:21 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by norgeskog
thanks for praising Oregon, ironchef, I live in Eugene. I love Deschutes brews, usually Mirror Pond, which I can get in local pubs on tap. WInes are great, like you said. Have not been to HOod Rover.
I lived there for a bit when I was going to school at Western Culinary Institute. IMO the Pacific Northwest (including Northern Cali) is one of the greatest and most fertile regions on the planet in terms of what it offers in food and beverage. Fresh seafood, game, meats, wines, beer, cheese, produce...all fresh, great quality, and made locally.
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Old 03-10-2005, 04:45 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by ironchef
I lived there for a bit when I was going to school at Western Culinary Institute. IMO the Pacific Northwest (including Northern Cali) is one of the greatest and most fertile regions on the planet in terms of what it offers in food and beverage. Fresh seafood, game, meats, wines, beer, cheese, produce...all fresh, great quality, and made locally.
precisely why I love it here ironchef...
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Old 03-12-2005, 07:43 PM   #34
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This is the worst crap beer ever!!!!!
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Old 04-02-2005, 11:12 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by ironchef
In addition to Pyramid, Red Hook is another good brewery to visit if you're in the Seattle area.
Been there, done that! It is a nice place, and so pretty too!

Any brewerys you guys can recommend for Los Angeles county?
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Old 04-03-2005, 12:48 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by buckytom
umm, damp, you're treading on dangerous ground. beer IS healthy. it's just liquid bread. hops, barley, and water. would you deny your family and loved ones bread and water? sheesh!!!!
You're right for most beers Buckytom, but not Bud, they also use rice, yep rice.

From the Anheuser-Busch website:

Budweiser is made with an all-natural process from barley malt, hops, rice, yeast and pure water.

Why they use rice I do not know. Just know I do not like the stuff (Bud that is, most beers I do).
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Old 04-03-2005, 05:49 PM   #37
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The following is an extract from "Craft Brewer" explaining why corn and rice are used in CAP (Classic American Pilsners.)

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While brewers appreciate 6-row malt for its high diastatic power and large proportion of husk, they also don't like it because of its high protein content and large proportion of husk! This apparent contradiction arises because while husks provide the filter through which the wort is clarified, too much of it can add astringency to the beer. The high protein content of 6-row can make the final product hazy and unstable.

To counter these problems, American brewers (many of whom were German immigrants) diluted the 6-row malt with corn. This had the pleasant side effect of giving the beer a mildly sweet corn flavor. It was not until later that corn and rice were used in larger quantities to lighten flavor and increase profits. It is probably appropriate to use corn at a rate of up to 20% of the grain bill, the remainder being 6-row Pilsner malt. Starting gravities may have ranged from 1.048 up to 1.070, but it was probably most commonly brewed in the lower end of this range.
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