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Old 02-04-2009, 12:14 PM   #1
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Question Garden layout

So, I grew up with a garden, and have knowledge of how to start seeds, grow, when to plant etc. But, last year, I wasnt able to plant as much as I liked due to lack of tiller, and we also got a LOT of rain. This year, I am much more organized, and know what to expect in the yard (this will be our second full summer here), and know what all I want to plant. I have been surfing around the net looking for "ideal" garden plans, layouts, where to put stuff, etc. I have seen software, but it just lets you throw stuff wherever. I am feeling like a need an ag degree to figure this out! Gardening does save a LOT of money, but not when I make costly mistakes!!!

Does anyone have any good sites that help with laying out a garden, and where stuff should ideally go in relation to what is planted, etc? Our garden will be about 75 feet running north and south, and 50 feet east and west. Well, I have that space available anyways to fill up lol!!! Much appreciation with any assistance!

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Old 02-04-2009, 12:46 PM   #2
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Just make sure you consider the height of your plants and the angle of the sun when you plan it. You don't want taller ones blocking the sunlight for the shorter ones.
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Old 02-04-2009, 01:52 PM   #3
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DH made a raised bed with one big square divided into four smaller squares with railroad ties; each of the smaller squares is about 5x5 feet. Having a raised bed provides drainage even when we get a lot of rain at once, and the railroad ties allow us to get into the garden for weeding and harvesting without stepping on the soil.

We plant marigolds in each of the corners of the four squares; they help discourage nematodes that bother tomatoes and other nightshade plants (peppers, chiles, eggplant, etc.).

I also stopped using stakes for tomatoes - the vines just slide down the stakes and I could never figure out how to make the stakes hold the vines up. We use 3-foot-high lengths of fencing from the garden center to hold up the vines.
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Old 02-04-2009, 02:36 PM   #4
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yeah I have been thinking of some raised beds for permanent plants like asparagus and strawberries. Of all the seeds I bought none of them say how tall they will get either grr!
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Old 02-04-2009, 02:41 PM   #5
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Can you list what you plan to grow? Don't have to bother with varieties, just veggie type - tomatoes, bush beans, pole beans, lettuce, etc., etc. That will give enough info re: heights, etc.
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Old 02-04-2009, 06:38 PM   #6
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pole and bush beans, peas, tomatoes, peppers, watermelon, cantaloupe, cukes, zucchini and yellow squash, okra.. so far lol! I am going to plot some 15x15 corn, but those will be away from the garden, of course lol! I was wondering if I search the seeds I have I can probably find the heights on the web. I guess I have read some about companion planting and am worried I will plant something next to something I shouldnt lol!

I was also thinking of doing some potager, mixing plants and flowers around the yard too. Diving in head first I suppose!
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Old 02-11-2009, 06:43 AM   #7
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To me you cannot go wrong with Square Foot Gardening. I have not looked at the website (squarefootgardening) but refer to the book (by Mel Bartholomew) often. My current yard doesn't take to the concept very well, but I bought the raised bed forms when I lived in Florida, and we built them in Hawaii. It is much simpler to deal with than old fashioned rows, and can be very attractive as well. So check it out.
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Old 02-11-2009, 06:46 AM   #8
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Skip over to raised bed vegetable gardening right below or above this (depending on who wrote what, when) and see L. Stewart's garden for a perfect example. Gorgeous, no?
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Old 02-11-2009, 07:36 AM   #9
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Check in the seed catalogs about plant height. Some things grow better with other plants such as peppers and tomatoes go together and leaf lettuce and green onions. Here's a link that I find useful The GardenWeb Forums - GardenWeb

It's getting time to start tomato and pepper seeds. I am going to try some heirloom tomatoes this year. I can't wait.

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Old 02-15-2009, 01:29 PM   #10
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Watermelon, cantaloupe and cucumbers grow on vines that will spread out all over the place if you let them. For cukes and cantaloupe, you can train the vines to grow on a wire fence, to keep them off the ground and prevent them from taking up so much space. Watermelon get so heavy, it's hard to do that with them. Remember to leave lots of space between them and other plants.
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