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Old 03-27-2012, 03:59 PM   #1
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Teriyaki something?

Hoping to get some ideas for dinner. My fella told me he wants "teriyaki something" for supper, using my homemade recipe. I instantly suggested stir-fry since we have tons of veggies. He wasn't too keen on stir-fry. His suggestion was skewers, but I wasn't keen on that.

So... looking for other teriyaki-related meal ideas. I've got chicken, beef and pork for meats, so the sky is the limit!

Thanks in advance!

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Old 03-27-2012, 05:40 PM   #2
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Satays
Grilled or roasted veggies
Rice
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Old 03-27-2012, 05:45 PM   #3
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Marinate chicken thighs for a couple of hours and oven bake.
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Old 03-27-2012, 05:53 PM   #4
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My suggestion, and it is just a suggestion; Make your teryaki marinade, but add a little heat to it, in the form of your favorite peppers. Cube either pork or chicken into bite-sized pieces.. Marinate the meat for 20 minutes or so. Then, make a batter of 1/2 cup ap flour, 1/2 cup cornstarch, 2 tsp. baking powder, and 3/4 cup water, with a half tsp. of salt added for flavor. Ok, you can add a bit of garlic powder too.

Heat three inches of cookign oil in a frying pan. Drain the meat, reserving the liquid to make a dipping sauce. Add the meat to the batter, and then place the coated cubes into the hot oil. Cook to a golden brown.

Heat the teryaki sauce to a rolling boil and add a tbs. of cornstarch slurry to the hot liquid. Stir until it thickens. Serve with cooked rice and steamed snow peas.

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Old 03-30-2012, 01:47 AM   #5
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Thanks for the suggestions everyone! Chief Longwind, I think I ended up doing closest to yours:

My other half has no palate for heat, so I just added a tad of cayenne pepper to my teriyaki sauce - but of course added a puddle of hot sauce to my plate. Cut up a pork tenderloin, marinated for a while, then threw it in the oven on a broiler pan. Thickened up my sauce and served over the pork - with an easy side of instant mashed potatoes

Here's the finished product:
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Old 03-30-2012, 02:11 AM   #6
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chief, i think it's interesting that ypu coated and fried your protein before adding the sauce(or was it for dipping?). either way, it's reminiscient of a sweet and sour sauce. i don't think that i've ever had teryaki sauce on coated meat, only as a marinade or brushed on plainly grilled meats.
i'll have to try that.

zhi and van, i like the idea of baking teryaki. it's difficult to grill or broil because the sauce burns so easily from the sugar. thanks.
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Old 03-30-2012, 07:44 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
chief, i think it's interesting that ypu coated and fried your protein before adding the sauce(or was it for dipping?). either way, it's reminiscient of a sweet and sour sauce. i don't think that i've ever had teryaki sauce on coated meat, only as a marinade or brushed on plainly grilled meats.
i'll have to try that.

zhi and van, i like the idea of baking teryaki. it's difficult to grill or broil because the sauce burns so easily from the sugar. thanks.
Bt, instead of making tempura coated protien, try this:
Make your teryaki marinade, and add cornstarch to the marinade to turn it into a slurry. Place thin meat strips (chicken, duck, pork, or beef) into the marinade and let sit for thirty minutes or so. Heat oil to 300' F. and place the meat strips into the oi. Leave poach until the coating becomes translucent and remove to a suitable container.

Make your stir-fried veggies, seasoned for whatever dish you're making. Add enough of the marinade to the veggies to make a sauce. Add meat and serve with rice, or fried bean thread noodles.

This method for cooking the meat is called velvetizing, and is used to both flavor the meat, and make it super-tender.

Of course you can use whatever flavor you want for the marinade, thickened into a slurry with cornstarch before adding the meat. Just think of it. You could make beef jerky flavored beef strips that are super tender and added to a pepper-steak stir fry. Or add peanut butter and appropriate seasonings to give it a Thai flavor. Anything's possible.

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Old 03-30-2012, 11:54 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
chief, i think it's interesting that ypu coated and fried your protein before adding the sauce(or was it for dipping?). either way, it's reminiscient of a sweet and sour sauce. i don't think that i've ever had teryaki sauce on coated meat, only as a marinade or brushed on plainly grilled meats.
i'll have to try that.

zhi and van, i like the idea of baking teryaki. it's difficult to grill or broil because the sauce burns so easily from the sugar. thanks.
Baking teriyaki-soaked meats is delicious. The sauce cooks away really fast (so I always brush a bit more sauce on halfway through baking), but the flavor remains really strong. I find that the meat forms a nice crust and is almost reminiscent of jerky. Fantastic!!

The downside? The horrendous mess it leaves behind as the sauce drips off the meat. I find it easiest to bake on a broiler pan with some water - less scrubbing during clean up time.
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Old 03-31-2012, 04:33 AM   #9
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I bake my teriyaki meats too, but always spray the pan with oil. The burnt on sugar just floats off when soaked in water a little while.
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Old 03-31-2012, 11:33 AM   #10
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Neat! I'll have to try that next time.
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