"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-24-2014, 05:26 PM   #11
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 511
the situation is perfectly understandable.
the theory of "hours per pound" only works in a narrow range.

outrageous example follows:

you have a three bone standing rib roast. weights about 10 pounds. it's about 25 inches in circumference and 8 inches long

you have a thirty five bone standing rib roast. weighs about 120 pounds. it's about 25 inches in circumference and 93.6 inches long.

you stick dozens of thermal measuring devices in each and put them in the oven.

they both are done at (essentially) the same time.

why?

because heat 'penetrates' into a roast through the surface - not the mass aka pounds.

so for the same surface area, the heat has to penetrate the same meat thickness "skin to center" on the 10 pounder as the 120 pounder.

the ration of "ends area" to "sides area" will affect small roasts, on a 35 bone long roast, not so much.

and this is why the NASA Rocket Thermodynamic Experts invented "the thermometer"
__________________

__________________
dcSaute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2014, 07:37 PM   #12
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
the situation is perfectly understandable.
the theory of "hours per pound" only works in a narrow range.

outrageous example follows:

you have a three bone standing rib roast. weights about 10 pounds. it's about 25 inches in circumference and 8 inches long

you have a thirty five bone standing rib roast. weighs about 120 pounds. it's about 25 inches in circumference and 93.6 inches long.

you stick dozens of thermal measuring devices in each and put them in the oven.

they both are done at (essentially) the same time.

why?

because heat 'penetrates' into a roast through the surface - not the mass aka pounds.

so for the same surface area, the heat has to penetrate the same meat thickness "skin to center" on the 10 pounder as the 120 pounder.

the ration of "ends area" to "sides area" will affect small roasts, on a 35 bone long roast, not so much.

and this is why the NASA Rocket Thermodynamic Experts invented "the thermometer"

Could you post a photo of the steer a 35 rib roast came from.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2014, 10:08 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,879
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Could you post a photo of the steer a 35 rib roast came from.
I was thinking the same but you said it better.
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2014, 10:14 PM   #14
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,289
Hol-eeeee Cow!
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2014, 10:19 PM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,098
Prime Rib finished faster than expected

Now, I can run a chain saw and a band saw with the best, but can't imagine running a whole cow through it...

Hm. Maybe a scroll saw or a Dremel with attachments?
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2014, 10:51 PM   #16
Head Chef
 
salt and pepper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Montana
Posts: 2,026
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
I've wrapped the finished (or almost finished) rib roast in foil and towel, and placed it in a small igloo cooler for several hours before serving. The roast will stay very warm until carving.
Actually, the roast will continue to cook while resting in the cooler so take that into account.

My last roast I did over the weekend was a 7 pound NY roast. I roasted it in the oven for 45 min at 450F, then immediately wrapped and stuck it in the igloo cooler for 2 hours before serving. Perfect med rare.

That's how I would do it...
__________________
salt and pepper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2014, 12:51 PM   #17
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Colorado
Posts: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
the situation is perfectly understandable.
the theory of "hours per pound" only works in a narrow range.

outrageous example follows:

you have a three bone standing rib roast. weights about 10 pounds. it's about 25 inches in circumference and 8 inches long

you have a thirty five bone standing rib roast. weighs about 120 pounds. it's about 25 inches in circumference and 93.6 inches long.

you stick dozens of thermal measuring devices in each and put them in the oven.

they both are done at (essentially) the same time.

why?

because heat 'penetrates' into a roast through the surface - not the mass aka pounds.

so for the same surface area, the heat has to penetrate the same meat thickness "skin to center" on the 10 pounder as the 120 pounder.

the ration of "ends area" to "sides area" will affect small roasts, on a 35 bone long roast, not so much.

and this is why the NASA Rocket Thermodynamic Experts invented "the thermometer"
This makes a lot of sense. Yesterday, I realized the time per pound rule probably is not linear. For me, its a lesson learned! Next year's prime rib will go a lot more smoothly.

As for the reheat it went pretty well. I reheated it between 225-250 for about 2.5 hours. I didn't use plastic, just covered it in aluminum foil, and it came out great!

I didn't get a picture of it warmed up, but I took this picture of it this morning after I cut a slice off for breakfast. You can see that after the reheat it still looks nice and red!

__________________
zenthoef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2014, 02:47 PM   #18
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,045
Quote:
Originally Posted by zenthoef View Post
This makes a lot of sense. Yesterday, I realized the time per pound rule probably is not linear. For me, its a lesson learned! Next year's prime rib will go a lot more smoothly.

As for the reheat it went pretty well. I reheated it between 225-250 for about 2.5 hours. I didn't use plastic, just covered it in aluminum foil, and it came out great!

I didn't get a picture of it warmed up, but I took this picture of it this morning after I cut a slice off for breakfast. You can see that after the reheat it still looks nice and red!
Congrats... glad it worked out in the end. No matter how many times I've done it, I'm always apprehensive when I cook an expensive piece of meat.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2014, 05:48 AM   #19
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,408
When I lived in Las Vegas, I had a restaurant owner buddy tell me that they cooked up all their prime rib ahead of time. It was cooked to rare and refrigerated. When someone came in and ordered it, the chef would cut a slice off and heat it up to the desired degree of doneness in a pot of warmed au jus on the stove. Apparently this is the way many restaurants handle prime rib.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2014, 10:11 AM   #20
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,393
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
When I lived in Las Vegas, I had a restaurant owner buddy tell me that they cooked up all their prime rib ahead of time. It was cooked to rare and refrigerated. When someone came in and ordered it, the chef would cut a slice off and heat it up to the desired degree of doneness in a pot of warmed au jus on the stove. Apparently this is the way many restaurants handle prime rib.

Interesting, Steve, how do they manage not to overcook? And what if person doesn't like the sauce?


Sent from my iPhone using Discuss Cooking
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
fast

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.