"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-08-2012, 11:59 PM   #71
Assistant Cook
 
Bmhughes89's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks
Yes. Any additional cooking will merely result in more "overshoot" of your desired temperature.

Experienced chefs often take their roasts out of the oven short of the ultimate target temperature in anticipation of this overshoot. It is often an experience that must be learned. After taking your roast chicken (beef, pork) out of the oven, monitor the ultimate peak temperature and relate that to what it was when you took it out, and relate that to how you like it cooked. Take good notes and adjust your procedure accordingly.
I was going to post this. Food cooks after taken out of the oven, pan, any heat activated cooking apparatus. It's usually good to take chicken out around 155 and let it rest. Resting meat allows the muscle tissue to regain the moisture cooking the meat is pulling out. Same reason to why a duck breast severely bleeds out if you cut it right out of the pan.
__________________

__________________
Bmhughes89 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2012, 12:12 AM   #72
Head Chef
 
Caslon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Inside the fridge
Posts: 1,707
I cooked a cornish game hen the other night, in the oven. I put it on one of those wire rack chicken stands. I followed one sites recommendation which I will probably follow from now on. 325 F for an hour per pound. My game hen was 1.7 pounds so I cooked it at that temp for about 100 minutes. The recipe then called for turning up the oven to 400 F for 25 minutes. It worked out well. Cooking at the somewhat lower 325 F really made that game hen smell like a small thanksgiving turkey. Btw, I was going for a lemon pepper game hen. I poured a lot of lemon pepper seasoning into the cavity, but wish I had added more. Next time I will do the same and zest some lemon peel into the cavity.


The end temp probe read about 170 F. Next time, I might leave it in the oven longer than the 100 minutes to get to 180 F. I hope that the breast meat doesn't get too dry tho. The skin turned out crisp, but not overly so, which was a concern of mine.
__________________

__________________
Caslon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2012, 09:48 AM   #73
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,387
You cooked a 1.7 pound chicken for 2 hours and 5 minutes and it was only 170F?
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2012, 10:50 AM   #74
Master Chef
 
FrankZ's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Posts: 9,633
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post

All you have to do is turn it on and stick the tip of the probe into the thickest part of the meat and let the temperature register..
I have much better success if I insert the probe wait a moment then turn it on. I read that tip on a manufacturer's website.
__________________
"First you start with a pound of bologna..."
-My Grandmother on how to make ham salad.
FrankZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2012, 10:56 AM   #75
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,387
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
I have much better success if I insert the probe wait a moment then turn it on. I read that tip on a manufacturer's website.
What difference in performance did you notice?
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2012, 11:07 AM   #76
Master Chef
 
FrankZ's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Posts: 9,633
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
What difference in performance did you notice?
Much quicker readings.

I will point out I just bought a new one (with thermocouple) and it is supposed to be fast to start with. But I get 3-4 second reading instead of 10ish with it if I insert it first.
__________________
"First you start with a pound of bologna..."
-My Grandmother on how to make ham salad.
FrankZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2012, 11:08 AM   #77
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,387
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
Much quicker readings.
Thanks, I'll give it a try.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2012, 06:39 PM   #78
Sous Chef
 
kitchengoddess8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 873
The problem I have with using a meat thermometer is that it's hard to see through my oven door (it's an old oven). I would have to keep opening the door which would create a sudden drop in temperature, making it hard to get an even bake or roast on the meat.
__________________
kitchengoddess8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2012, 06:51 PM   #79
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,387
The type of thermometer I pictured is not to be left in the oven. You would open the door, check it, remove the thermometer, and close the door.

If you want the type you leave in the food, look for one of these.

http://www.amazon.com/Polder-Digital...d_sbs_indust_4

Yu put the probe into the meat, run the wire out of the oven and plug it into the display that stays on the counter.

No need to try to read the temp through the oven window.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2012, 10:16 PM   #80
Sous Chef
 
kitchengoddess8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
The type of thermometer I pictured is not to be left in the oven. You would open the door, check it, remove the thermometer, and close the door.

If you want the type you leave in the food, look for one of these.

http://www.amazon.com/Polder-Digital...d_sbs_indust_4

Yu put the probe into the meat, run the wire out of the oven and plug it into the display that stays on the counter.

No need to try to read the temp through the oven window.
Thanks for clarifying! How often do you usually check the temperature with the first type of thermometer you described.
__________________

__________________
kitchengoddess8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.