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Old 01-02-2012, 08:00 PM   #401
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
And as far as I know the traditional sausage casing is intestines.
Kind of. Natural casing is the intestinal sub-mucosa, the thin, smooth layer just below the heavily folded an slimy mucosa. So there's some good bit of processing to remove the outer muscle and fat layers. With beef casings, a layer of esophagus or bladder or one of the stomachs is also used. (Those big baloneys.) Intestines are processed using rollers or some other pressure device to crush and loosen everything that's not the tough sub-mucosa. (Again, little is wasted. Mucosa is used to make medical blood thinner.) What's left is collagen, the substance that makes skin, tendons, etc. tough enough to work and that makes heavily used muscle meat tough - that is, until it's cooked slow and moist and becomes gelatin, as we do with "cheap" cuts. And it's the collagen that's tough enough to survive the prep process and to contain the sausage filling under pressure. Likely it wasn't any great leap for early man to discover casing. They were already using skin, tendon, etc. by cleaning off the unwanted layers, and the toughness of intestines would have suggested that there was a useful layer to be had for use as bindings, and bladders and stomachs were very early used to contain water and to cook food prior to ceramics.
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Old 01-02-2012, 08:02 PM   #402
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
It's not from USA? I didn't know that.
I was posing a question.
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Old 01-02-2012, 08:17 PM   #403
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GLC View Post
Kind of. Natural casing is the intestinal sub-mucosa, the thin, smooth layer just below the heavily folded an slimy mucosa. So there's some good bit of processing to remove the outer muscle and fat layers. With beef casings, a layer of esophagus or bladder or one of the stomachs is also used. (Those big baloneys.) Intestines are processed using rollers or some other pressure device to crush and loosen everything that's not the tough sub-mucosa. (Again, little is wasted. Mucosa is used to make medical blood thinner.) What's left is collagen, the substance that makes skin, tendons, etc. tough enough to work and that makes heavily used muscle meat tough - that is, until it's cooked slow and moist and becomes gelatin, as we do with "cheap" cuts. And it's the collagen that's tough enough to survive the prep process and to contain the sausage filling under pressure. Likely it wasn't any great leap for early man to discover casing. They were already using skin, tendon, etc. by cleaning off the unwanted layers, and the toughness of intestines would have suggested that there was a useful layer to be had for use as bindings, and bladders and stomachs were very early used to contain water and to cook food prior to ceramics.
My MIL grew up on a farm. She and her brothers had to clean intestines for casings. They did it by hand. The kids were not fond of doing it. (Big surprise)
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Old 01-02-2012, 08:22 PM   #404
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I was posing a question.
Well let me throw my 2 pennies in here. No Green Bean Casserole is not a Original Tradition, but it has made it's place as a traditional holiday dish over the last 56 years.
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Old 01-02-2012, 09:25 PM   #405
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That green bean casserole is not a real American holiday tradition. It was made up by Campnell Soup Company to increase sales for their Cream of Mushroom soup. It was printed in time for Thanksgiving in their ads in such a way that folks began to think that it was unAmerican to not make it for this time of year. Campbell also owns the French Onion brand. If they had owned a green bean product at the time they would have printed their own name brand of that also. I would rather make my own cream of anything recipe. Less salt yet more flavor. I make cream carrots with white sauce and organic carrots with the tops still on them. The kind you have to peel. I hate the texture of those little peeled carrots. They have been treated with chemicals to keep them looking fresh. I will do my own work, thank you.
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I was posing a question.
I was agreeing with Addie, for all the reasons that she stated, and her post speaks more eloquently to your question than I could.

I'm no arbiter in what constitutes anything except my own opinion, and IMO the Campbell/French's commercial recipe is not an American tradition, at least not in my family. IMO it's a commercial marketing campaign intended to promote Campbell products.

As I said, I like the recipe but I expect that if I cooked it often I'd tire of it. It's not a real recipe since it requires brand name products, and it's not an American tradition, not in my personal opinion. Your mileage may vary.
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Old 01-02-2012, 09:40 PM   #406
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I apologize for creating confusion.

I guess my question should be posed to Addie. Why isn't GBC an American holiday tradition?
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Old 01-02-2012, 09:43 PM   #407
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wow, for a group of foodies, there sure is a lot of dislikes. Think I'll go cook some liver and cauliflower... :)
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Old 01-02-2012, 09:50 PM   #408
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both of my ancestries (norwegian and irish) make blood pudding/sausage. i have to say that i've enjoyed both types.

it sounds disgusting but it doesn't taste bad. it really just adds a sort of food colouring and a slight mineral taste, but if no one told you what was in the sausage, i doubt anyone would guess.
My grandson just emailed and said that he went to the cafe LAVANT COMOIR in Paris (he has been working over there) and he had blood sausage, it was served with a little side of apples and cinnamon. He said he knows that it sound strange but they went together really well.
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Old 01-02-2012, 10:03 PM   #409
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wow, for a group of foodies, there sure is a lot of dislikes. Think I'll go cook some liver and cauliflower... :)


really! i'll bring the blood sausage....
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Old 01-02-2012, 10:11 PM   #410
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I am bringing hotdogs and smoked eel!
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