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Old 08-08-2006, 06:26 PM   #1
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Anyone grow hot chilies?

Im getting a house in October and i'm going to grow a hot chile garden.

How awesome is that?

Here are the plants i want to grow.


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Caribbean Red Habanero (C. chinense)-a favorite for taste, heat and productivity. Very hot, pendant pods are borne in abundance on a slow growing plant. One of the things I noticed last year about the Caribbean Reds is that they are very productive but the plant grows rather slowly, and is somewhat more bushy than a red or orange hab. Nonetheless, a nicely productive plant that gives pods with consistent heat and flavor. Early season and easy to grow. Obviously susceptible to pepper maggots (yuck!). I highly recommend them. Matures through orange then red.


Billy Goat-(C. chinense), a very cool chinense. Slightly longer season than the standard chinense (I'd say about 110 days) but so worth the wait. Very tasty fruit, small pods, very tall, upright and prolific plant. Taste is the outstanding quality of these, chileplants.com describes the flavor as cherry-like, and I could taste that effect. Very underestimated. Will find room for another one of these next year. Pendant fruit matures to red.

Scotch Bonnet, Red (C. chinense, from www.tomatogrowers.com)-very nice. Medium height but bushy (not sprawling) plant bears a very good number of peppers that closely resemble the caribbean red in morphology. May even be more productive than the caribbean red. Same level of flavor as the caribbean red, but slightly more fruity and not as hot. Length of season is reasonable, maybe 85-90 days. Pendant fruit matures to red. Comes highly recommended.

Chocolate Habanero (C. chinense)-very smoky and very, very hot. Probably the 3rd hottest pepper I have grown, out of almost 50 that I have grown. The only ones that was hotter to me was a chocolate scotch bonnet, and the trinidad scorpion, the latter of which was hellish. Not so prolific at first but the second harvest is very large. Plants tend to get very tall (over 3 feet) and the season is a touch longer than other chinenses, but well worth it. Pods are wrinkled, larger and not as symmetrical as many other chinenses. Should be a staple in any habanero lover's garden. Pendant fruit matures to deep chocolate brown.

Fatalii (C. chinense)-aptly named, flavor is almost identical to the limon (I grew the limon last year-exceptional taste and productivity, with a high flavor to heat ratio. Hot but so flavorful, will definitely grow limon again next year) Anyway, the fatalii, very lemony. Much hotter than the limon, but not quite as hot as I expected based on the root word of the name. Very tall upright plant (over 3.5 feet) bore an abundance of pendant fruit, but not as early as the catalogs advertise (one of the later maturing varieties, to be honest). Very prolific and easy to grow. Wonderful pickled and roasted. Easy to become a favorite. Matures to yellow.

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Anyone have any experience growing hot chilies?

Share!

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Old 08-08-2006, 06:27 PM   #2
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I've never grown anything but jalapenos. You are being very aggressive!
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Old 08-08-2006, 06:29 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
I've never grown anything but jalapenos. You are being very aggressive!
im in LOVE peppers & hot sauce.

i'm a fanatic.

I figure this is a GREAT productive hobby to have, not to mention learning a craft. Being able to harvest your own peppers and make your own sauces sounds right up my alley. The kind of thing you work on for a lifetime.


will you share your experiences with the jalepenos andy? i'm interested.
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Old 08-08-2006, 06:29 PM   #4
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Jalapenos and Serranos for me.
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Old 08-08-2006, 06:36 PM   #5
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Are jalepenos and serranos easy? how my space do they take up?

Are they very similar in style, as far as how to care for them, how long it takes to fruit, etc etc...
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Old 08-08-2006, 06:50 PM   #6
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Right now I am growing jalapenos and habaneros. I have never had luck with jalapenos, but I am hoping this year is different. They always grow fine, but never have any heat.

My jalapeno plants all have fruit on them right now and will be ready to harvest soon. My habs have nothing going on at all. I am wondering if they will produce at all.

Do you know how much space you have for your garden? You may want to consider growing some other veggies too.
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Old 08-08-2006, 07:12 PM   #7
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I only grow jalapenos. My plants have always grown into a 2'x3' bush. This year my crop has been very light due to the tomatos shading the peppers.

I've never ever had tomato plants this big.
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Old 08-08-2006, 07:30 PM   #8
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The last few years we have bought what was supposed to be habanero plants. Every year we ended with anything but. Jalapenos, Indian peppers, banana peppers etc. This year, I planted 36 plants, and they actually look like habs!!!! In my garden and climate, they are very easy to grow. The habanero sauce and salsa make great Christmas gifts.
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Old 08-08-2006, 07:48 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Right now I am growing jalapenos and habaneros. I have never had luck with jalapenos, but I am hoping this year is different. They always grow fine, but never have any heat.

My jalapeno plants all have fruit on them right now and will be ready to harvest soon. My habs have nothing going on at all. I am wondering if they will produce at all.

Do you know how much space you have for your garden? You may want to consider growing some other veggies too.
I will have a good amount of room.

Who knows what i will end up planting.

I might as well plant some serranos and jalapenos too.
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Old 08-08-2006, 08:43 PM   #10
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I have a couple of jalapeno plants in my little herb garden. Had one last year that yielded two crops. so far, not as many this year, because the peppers are being shaded by the tarragon. I need to have a few minutes to go cut the tarragon and the thyme back before they take over the world!
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