"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-04-2006, 02:00 PM   #11
Senior Cook
 
RDG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Milano, Italy
Posts: 223
Send a message via MSN to RDG
Urmaniac, the automatic stirrer is generally for polenta. In polenta dish, you have to stir practically continuosly: for a couple of hours ( if you are doing the true one). So, an authomatic gadget is wellcome. But for risotto...it's enough you stir every minute or two, just a turn up tu revolve the rice, that must be cooked at a very low flame.....The one you have put online seems to be a stirrer for icecreams....But, in everyway, stirrer is a stirrer.
__________________

__________________
RDG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2006, 03:30 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,764
Send a message via MSN to urmaniac13 Send a message via Skype™ to urmaniac13
Yes, we have used this for polenta, too... then we discovered the instant polenta which gives us pretty satisfying result, thus we started to cheat... Yes maybe it is up to personal preference when it comes to a matter of stirring every 1 or 2 minutes over less than half an hour, but I am often doing something else while it is cooking and it is a bit of hassle having to keep coming back to it, especially when guests are coming... so personally I found it useful in certain occasions.
Our ice cream maker has a blade quite different from that... it looks like this
you can sort of see the blade... it sticks out towards both sides... thus I never thought of any resemblance to an ice cream mixer!!
__________________

__________________
urmaniac13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2006, 03:56 PM   #13
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Quote:
The difference between Risotto "alla milanese" and other recipes is in toasting. In other traditions, rice is not toasted: this process causes the rice skin to break, and allow it to absorb the condiments and flavours.


By other traditions, do you mean other risotto recipes in the Milan/Lombardia region or just in general throughout Italy? The reason I'm asking is because the Italian chef that I worked under always toasted the rice for our risotto dishes whether it was for the alla Milanese, the Risotto ai Fruitti di Mare, the Risotto ai Funghi Misti, etc. He was born and raised in the Puglia region, and trained in restaurants in Umbria, Toscana, Lazio, and Abruzzo. Maybe this was just his personal preferrence.
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2006, 05:13 AM   #14
Senior Cook
 
RDG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Milano, Italy
Posts: 223
Send a message via MSN to RDG
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef

By other traditions, do you mean other risotto recipes in the Milan/Lombardia region or just in general throughout Italy? .
May be that, all the times I speak of "traditions", I don't use the correct word . Milano and the north of Italy are, here, the biggest producers (and consumers) of rice, at the same way in which the south does the same for pasta (it's a generalization, but rather correct). Since centuries ago, ancient (traditional) recipes in north are composed with rice, and, in the south, with pasta.
Even around Milano, (Cremona, Mantova, the whole Piemonte ) the ancient recipes don't use toasting. After that, in more than 500 years, many regions have adopted the (good) uses of others. And toasted rice is one of this: risotto becomes better . I don't know WHO effectively, used the first toasting in History; but, in every way, now the process is a common thing to do a good (better) risotto. And, for this, is adopted all over Italy. You have to consider that it's not a process that "change" a recipe, but only a way to cook rice in a more tasty way.
There are hundreds and hundreds recipes for very, very good risotti, and many of them don't use toasting: some of them only boiling.
__________________
RDG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2006, 05:22 AM   #15
Senior Cook
 
RDG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Milano, Italy
Posts: 223
Send a message via MSN to RDG
A little gift; this is the simplest one I know, and it's excellent.
4 persons:
Boil (only boil) 350 gr. of rice in a big high pan with a lot of salted water for about 20 minutes, or, in every way, at your taste. Drain well, and let it dry out a bit, so each morsel will be separated: if necessary, put the rice in the oven for a couple of minutes.
A part, you have fried in evoo ( 10 spoons about) a good quantity of very fresh parsley. Just a minute, not more: don't burn it....
Add this over the rice, with grated parmesan.....More difficult to say than to do, and the result is over your thoughts....
__________________
RDG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2006, 02:45 PM   #16
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by RDG
May be that, all the times I speak of "traditions", I don't use the correct word . Milano and the north of Italy are, here, the biggest producers (and consumers) of rice, at the same way in which the south does the same for pasta (it's a generalization, but rather correct). Since centuries ago, ancient (traditional) recipes in north are composed with rice, and, in the south, with pasta.
Even around Milano, (Cremona, Mantova, the whole Piemonte ) the ancient recipes don't use toasting. After that, in more than 500 years, many regions have adopted the (good) uses of others. And toasted rice is one of this: risotto becomes better . I don't know WHO effectively, used the first toasting in History; but, in every way, now the process is a common thing to do a good (better) risotto. And, for this, is adopted all over Italy. You have to consider that it's not a process that "change" a recipe, but only a way to cook rice in a more tasty way.
There are hundreds and hundreds recipes for very, very good risotti, and many of them don't use toasting: some of them only boiling.
Thank you VERY much for that detailed explanation. It was very educational and helpful!
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2006, 02:51 PM   #17
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,764
Send a message via MSN to urmaniac13 Send a message via Skype™ to urmaniac13
Quote:
Originally Posted by RDG
A little gift; this is the simplest one I know, and it's excellent.
4 persons:
Boil (only boil) 350 gr. of rice in a big high pan with a lot of salted water for about 20 minutes, or, in every way, at your taste. Drain well, and let it dry out a bit, so each morsel will be separated: if necessary, put the rice in the oven for a couple of minutes.
A part, you have fried in evoo ( 10 spoons about) a good quantity of very fresh parsley. Just a minute, not more: don't burn it....
Add this over the rice, with grated parmesan.....More difficult to say than to do, and the result is over your thoughts....
Rob this sounds really good... do you think it would work with some left over rice? Like it is done when you make fried rice/or riso cantonese?? Rice will be more dry this way and maybe good for frying... what do you think?

When I learned the toasting technique of rice, I liked the result so much now I do it with any risotto recipe!! It is just a whole different story and gives a wonderful flavour and texture!!
__________________
urmaniac13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2006, 04:55 AM   #18
Senior Cook
 
RDG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Milano, Italy
Posts: 223
Send a message via MSN to RDG
Left over? Do you mean the rice you haven't eated the day before? I don't think so. The curious matter of this (stupid) recipe is the simple boiled rice. Moreover, rice should be drained, but non absolutely dried. A little humidity is really good for mixing parmesan.
This recipe makes part of a little number that I call "no-recipes". So simple that is useless to write them: it's only enough to know they exist.
In the years, I've developped a theory on "no-recipes": they must be simple, but not obtained with the food remained in fridge: they must be studied. And the result must be much better of what you can have imagined before.
Man has often found "no-recipes": some of them have become classic. Cheese and pears, f.i....
There is a proverb in italy, that I try to translate in English, manteining the form of poetry..Excuse me in advance...
"Dont't bring to farmer's ears/how much is good/ the cheese with pears".
__________________
RDG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2006, 05:07 AM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,773
rdg, how do you say that in italian?

lol, that's probably a regional thing, not that i'm saying something new about italy. most italian pears come from emilia-romagna in the north.

i wonder what kind of cheese is customary?

and don't forget the chocolate!
__________________
Ticking away the moments that make up a dull day.
Fritter and waste the hours in an off-hand way.
Kicking around on a piece of ground in your hometown,
waiting for someone or something to show you the way.
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2006, 05:17 AM   #20
Senior Cook
 
RDG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Milano, Italy
Posts: 223
Send a message via MSN to RDG

"al contadino non far sapere/ quant'Ť buono il formaggio con le pere"
All the tasty cheeses, provolone, pecorino, parmigiano, taleggio, branzi, not the light ones as mozzarella, robiola.
good appetite...
__________________

__________________
RDG is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.