"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-08-2009, 03:22 AM   #11
Assistant Cook
 
kranne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Budapest, Hungary
Posts: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
I used to have Chicken Paprika with bread dumplings and Liver Dumpling Soup for lunch everyday when I lived in Chicago. I thought I had died and gone to Heaven. I can't find a great recipe for either dish. .
Try to google the Hungarian names of these and type english and recipe after it. I cannot send u links yet, sorry...
chicken paprika: paprikás csirke or csirkepörkölt
bread dumplings: nokedli or galuska
liver bumpling soup: májgaluska leves

If u cannot find a good one or an english recipe, than I'll let u know how I make them!
__________________

__________________
kranne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2009, 04:31 AM   #12
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Not where you live
Posts: 197
Thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by kranne View Post
Try to google the Hungarian names of these and type english and recipe after it. I cannot send u links yet, sorry...
chicken paprika: paprikás csirke or csirkepörkölt
bread dumplings: nokedli or galuska
liver bumpling soup: májgaluska leves

If u cannot find a good one or an english recipe, than I'll let u know how I make them!
I was able to use Google to find english recipes for the soup and chicken.

Would you please share how you make the broth for chicken paprika and the liver soup?
__________________

__________________
linicx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2009, 05:23 AM   #13
Assistant Cook
 
kranne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Budapest, Hungary
Posts: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
I was able to use Google to find english recipes for the soup and chicken.

Would you please share how you make the broth for chicken paprika and the liver soup?
Ok, I'll try to do my best! :) Hope u will understand it, as I ned to use dictionary in some cases... I usually don't use cookery books when I cook, just but some of these and some of those, but I'll try to put down the amounts.

chicken paprika:
1 cut up chicken (any parts of it will do, so if u like only the leg, it's okay to put only that in it)
2 onions
1 or 2 tomatoes
2 tablespoons of oils or fat (u can use any... I never use margarine for this
about 1 tablespoon of paprika (make it red...:))
salt
pepper
white pepper (not necessary if u don't have any)
water

Saute the chopped onion in the oil, then add the chopped tomatoes also. Put the chicken into it, add the salt and pepper and steam it for 5-10 minutes. U can add the paprika before steaming, or after it. Just be careful, don't get it burnt, cause then the taste will go wrong... After steaming, add water. Water should cover about the half of the meat. Cover an cook for about an hour. (Till the meat gets tender enough) If u find that all of the water evaporated, u can put some more in it.
Before finishing the cooking, u can add some sour cream to it. If it's not creamy enough, add some flour to the sour cream.Stir it while adding it to the chicken, and boil it once more.

Some ppl like this food without sour cream, some adds it freshly before eating it. Every option is possible and tastes good, if u ask me.

For dumplings type into google: hungarian nokedli (dumplings) and there will be a recipe at recipezaar.
__________________
kranne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2009, 05:47 AM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
kranne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Budapest, Hungary
Posts: 14
liver soup

Going on with the liver soup: I'll translate the most famous cookery book in hungary, written by Ilona Horváth, to give u an official recipe.

First of all, cook some soup, that contains some bones, vegetable (carrot, white carrot /root of parsley/, peas, onion, parsley, celery, tomato) The most important is to add some carrot and onion and some other vegetables. What u have at home. U can use either pork or lamb or beef bones or some leftovers from a chicken. Put some salt and whole pepper if u'd like. Put some water in it. It depens how much u'd like to cook... Cover and cook these for 1 or 2 hours.

Liver dumplings (from Ilona Horváth):
ingredients:
1-2 chicken liver
1 tea-spoon of oil or 1 decagram fat
1 tea-spoon of grated onion
1 roll of bread sopped in milk
1 egg
flour
salt, pepper (powder), marjoram

Saute the onion in the oil. Get it off from the flames. Cut the liver into very little pieces--> u can just scrape it with a knife and it will become almost like a cream. Get the bread out of the milk squeeze it and crumble to pieces. Put everything (the oonion, bread, liver, egg and spices) together, stir it. U have to add so many flour, that u make it like some hard cream, but not too hard.

It can happen that it won't work for the first time, than try to add more or less flour to it. Hope it will be all right.

I think that's all!
__________________
kranne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2009, 11:11 AM   #15
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 623
Quote:
Originally Posted by kranne View Post
can they cook paprikáskrumpli? Or maybe lecsó or töltöttpaprika? These last two are hard to cook abroad, cause u need some kind of paprika/capsium that I've met only in Hungary. It's yellow and longer than than one we call Californian paprika/capsium. :)

when I was still living in California I was able to find the Hungarian
peppers in, of all things, a Mexican grocery! now I live in Missouri,
which is pretty rural and they don't have anything like that. I order
my paprika online from Otto's. my Dad was the cook in my family and
he made all those things that you listed pretty regularly. my grandmother on his side made stuffed cabbage whenever she came to visit and I
haven't tasted such ever again! I wish I had known to get her recipe
but at the time I was only a child!
__________________
ellakav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2009, 11:48 AM   #16
Executive Chef
 
mbasiszta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: U.S., Panama
Posts: 2,738
Hola all you Foodies out there. My last name is "Basiszta", so kranne will know I have at least some Hungarian in me. I love Hungarian Goulash, but it has to have lots of hot Humgarian Paprika - the real stuff.

A recipe that got lost in my family over the generations was for a good Hungarian Peasant bread. My grandmother made it with whole garlic cloves, so if you were lucky when you got a slice of bread (or when you tore off a piece when grandma wasn't watching) with some garlic - it was heavenly.

Can you help me with a genuine recipe for that bread, Kranne?

My grandfather was a Husar and we have blood from the stepps.

It is nice to have a landsman in our group.

Martín (in Panamá)
__________________
Happy cooking, Marty.
mbasiszta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2009, 01:41 PM   #17
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 623
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbasiszta View Post
Hola all you Foodies out there. My last name is "Basiszta", so kranne will know I have at least some Hungarian in me. I love Hungarian Goulash, but it has to have lots of hot Humgarian Paprika - the real stuff.

A recipe that got lost in my family over the generations was for a good Hungarian Peasant bread. My grandmother made it with whole garlic cloves, so if you were lucky when you got a slice of bread (or when you tore off a piece when grandma wasn't watching) with some garlic - it was heavenly.

Can you help me with a genuine recipe for that bread, Kranne?

My grandfather was a Husar and we have blood from the stepps.

It is nice to have a landsman in our group.

Martín (in Panamá)
if she doesn't have one (unlikely!) I have one for a garlic peasant
potato bread that totally rocks.
my maiden name was Chordas.
__________________
ellakav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2009, 03:15 PM   #18
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellakav View Post
when I was still living in California I was able to find the Hungarian
peppers in, of all things, a Mexican grocery! now I live in Missouri,
which is pretty rural and they don't have anything like that. I order
my paprika online from Otto's. my Dad was the cook in my family and
he made all those things that you listed pretty regularly. my grandmother on his side made stuffed cabbage whenever she came to visit and I
haven't tasted such ever again! I wish I had known to get her recipe
but at the time I was only a child!
Some 5 years ago we bought a few pounds of paprika from Otto's because the price seemed reasonable. However, to us, it seemed flat tasting as if it was cut with flour.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2009, 05:27 PM   #19
Executive Chef
 
mbasiszta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: U.S., Panama
Posts: 2,738
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellakav View Post
if she doesn't have one (unlikely!) I have one for a garlic peasant
potato bread that totally rocks.
my maiden name was Chordas.
OMG, that would be wonderful. Please share your garlic-potato bread recipe. I love making unleavened breads. It is not a religious thing for me, but rather memories of my grandmothers' cooking.
__________________
Happy cooking, Marty.
mbasiszta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2009, 06:57 PM   #20
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 623
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbasiszta View Post
OMG, that would be wonderful. Please share your garlic-potato bread recipe. I love making unleavened breads. It is not a religious thing for me, but rather memories of my grandmothers' cooking.

well, it's not really unleavened...it uses roughly a T. of yeast.
the closest I have to unleavened is a sourdough potato bread
recipe, which is also good.
__________________

__________________
ellakav is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
ethnic, hungarian

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:09 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.