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Old 01-05-2011, 01:06 PM   #21
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Making your own ricotta is simple as well. Although not cheese, obviously, I make creme fraiche which is tastier and MUCH cheaper. I saw it a couple of months ago for $12 CDN for 500 ml.
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Old 01-05-2011, 02:40 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by fricassee View Post
Making your own ricotta is simple as well. Although not cheese, obviously, I make creme fraiche which is tastier and MUCH cheaper. I saw it a couple of months ago for $12 CDN for 500 ml.
So, do you make mozzarella? I ask because AFAIK ricotta is made from the whey from making mozzarella.

I'm making a batch of creme fraiche right now. I had whipping cream left over from the holidays and this will extend its shelf life. I haven't tried it yet, but I have read that creme fraiche can be whipped like whipping cream.
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Old 01-05-2011, 02:46 PM   #23
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So, do you make mozzarella? I ask because AFAIK ricotta is made from the whey from making mozzarella.

I'm making a batch of creme fraiche right now. I had whipping cream left over from the holidays and this will extend its shelf life. I haven't tried it yet, but I have read that creme fraiche can be whipped like whipping cream.
Admittedly not lately!
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Old 01-08-2011, 10:14 AM   #24
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Making cheese at home can be easy and the results can be yummy! While on vacation last year, I took a one-day class at Kookoolan farm in Oregon. We started on quick Queso Fresco and fresh Mozzarella type cheeses. The book "Home Cheesemaking" by Ricki Carroll (available at Amazon) is a great guide. I hope to make it to Steve Shapson's Cheesemaking class in Wisconsin this year to learn more complex techniques. His website has resources for ordering any supplies you could want. Classes are really just for fun, the book can answer all your questions. I hope you find these resources helpful.
I'm totally hooked on home cheesemaking and would like to hear from others with more experience.
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Old 03-08-2011, 10:24 PM   #25
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Tonight, I made mozzarella cheese and ricotta cheese for the first time! It was pretty easy and I'm fairly pleased with the results. Prior to ordering supplies, I had reviewed The Home Creamery by Kathy Farrell-Kingsley. The book gave a suitable overview of dairy terms. It covered the basics of cultured dairy products and moved on to soft, unripened cheeses.

I had also purchased And That's How You Make Cheese! by Shane Sokol. On the plus side, this book explains cheese-making in very easy to understand terms. It did give me confidence to think I could easily turn my kitchen into a happy Home Creamery! On the minus side....if I ever meet the editor of this book, someone will need to give me an alibi. All I can say is it feels like no one proof-read the manuscript prior to the book being published. The typos are to the point that I'm unsure whether I trust the recipes.

I found a site called Leeners that had a good assortment of supplies for a reasonable price. They also had a kit that included many of the items that I had on my "purchase" list and included a mold. Perhaps I can try a pressed cheese this weekend!

My mozzarella turned out tasty though I think I will add a bit more salt to the finished product next time. I pulled it like taffy so that it developed more of a stringy texture than allowing it to stay more soft. With the whey, I made ricotta, which was so simple to make that it was almost embarrassing.

Perhaps while at work tomorrow, someone might use the ricotta to make some lasagna or manicotti. I guess I could point out that there is even spinach in the vegetable drawer that could be added to it. YUM. If only someone out there would avail themselves to the fresh spinach and fresh ricotta...hmm...if only.

I loved making these cheeses. So much fun!
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Old 03-08-2011, 10:35 PM   #26
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Can you make it from half and half?
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Old 03-09-2011, 01:53 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathleen View Post
Tonight, I made mozzarella cheese and ricotta cheese for the first time! It was pretty easy and I'm fairly pleased with the results. Prior to ordering supplies, I had reviewed The Home Creamery by Kathy Farrell-Kingsley. The book gave a suitable overview of dairy terms. It covered the basics of cultured dairy products and moved on to soft, unripened cheeses.

I had also purchased And That's How You Make Cheese! by Shane Sokol. On the plus side, this book explains cheese-making in very easy to understand terms. It did give me confidence to think I could easily turn my kitchen into a happy Home Creamery! On the minus side....if I ever meet the editor of this book, someone will need to give me an alibi. All I can say is it feels like no one proof-read the manuscript prior to the book being published. The typos are to the point that I'm unsure whether I trust the recipes.

I found a site called Leeners that had a good assortment of supplies for a reasonable price. They also had a kit that included many of the items that I had on my "purchase" list and included a mold. Perhaps I can try a pressed cheese this weekend!

My mozzarella turned out tasty though I think I will add a bit more salt to the finished product next time. I pulled it like taffy so that it developed more of a stringy texture than allowing it to stay more soft. With the whey, I made ricotta, which was so simple to make that it was almost embarrassing.

Perhaps while at work tomorrow, someone might use the ricotta to make some lasagna or manicotti. I guess I could point out that there is even spinach in the vegetable drawer that could be added to it. YUM. If only someone out there would avail themselves to the fresh spinach and fresh ricotta...hmm...if only.

I loved making these cheeses. So much fun!
Thanks for the report, Kathleen and the resources. I'll make Shrek crazy by starting another project. I think I'll need a bigger drawer this time!
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Old 03-09-2011, 02:37 AM   #28
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Enjoy your cheese Kathleen. Leeners looks interesting. They ship to Canada

Now I just need some spare money, oh and come to think of it, spare time. Tax season is starting.
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Old 03-09-2011, 12:09 PM   #29
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I make farmers cheese all the time. Doesn't have to be hanging in refrigerator for draining. It can be kept for at least couple of weeks. It is nothing like cottage or ricota cheese, it is supposed to be blend it is basicaly has taste of milk, unless it was too sour, i.e. adding too much vinegar. Tough curd is to be expected. 190 deg. sounds to hot for me.
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Old 03-09-2011, 06:47 PM   #30
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Can you make it from half and half?
I am so new at this that I honestly don't know what all I can use. I'm using recipes from books at this point and keeping track of what each item does. That being said, half and half makes awesome ice cream.

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I make farmers cheese all the time. Doesn't have to be hanging in refrigerator for draining. It can be kept for at least couple of weeks. It is nothing like cottage or ricota cheese, it is supposed to be blend it is basicaly has taste of milk, unless it was too sour, i.e. adding too much vinegar. Tough curd is to be expected. 190 deg. sounds to hot for me.
Charlie, please post one of your favorite recipes!

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Enjoy your cheese Kathleen. Leeners looks interesting. They ship to Canada

Now I just need some spare money, oh and come to think of it, spare time. Tax season is starting.
While the recipe I used is clearly for beginners, the mozzarella took less than an hour to make. The ricotta took another 40 minutes from start to finish. Regardless, I will imagine there is not even an hour to spare during tax time.

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Thanks for the report, Kathleen and the resources. I'll make Shrek crazy by starting another project. I think I'll need a bigger drawer this time!
He will love the end result!
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